Tag Archives: Diabetes

Can Eating Healthy Lengthen Life?

Many diet programs claim to help you lose weight, prevent chronic disease, and improve your overall well-being. However, could eating a healthy diet lengthen your life? A recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine reveals that healthy eating can extend life.hypertension, heart, blood pressure

Nutrition affects overall health in many ways. For example, those with diabetes must control intake of sugar. Therefore, natural sugars from fruits, veggies, and dairy products should be eaten versus processed sugars from colas, candy, and other sweets. On the other hand, those with high blood pressure should have a lower sodium diet. You can lower sodium in your diet by eating less processed food products such as deli meats, fast foods, and canned soups.

Vitamins and minerals from the food you eat help keep your body alive. Calcium and vitamin D keeps bones strong, while vitamin C provides immune protection.  Also, magnesium helps the body to use glucose efficiently, while potassium helps produce energy and nerve impulses.

A recent study looked at 74,000 people over 12 years, during which 10,000 of them died. The review of the study looked at the dietary habits of the people in the previous 12 years of their life before the study. Those who added more fiber-rich fruits, veggies, and whole grains had a lower risk of death than those whose diets stayed the same.

The Alternate Healthy Eating Index, Alternate Mediterranean Diet Index, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Diet Index set the score of the diets reviewed. Fruits, veggies, whole grains, healthy fats, and other whole foods got higher scores.  On the other hand, unhealthy processed, fatty and sugary foods got lower scores. A minor 20-percent change in diet helped decrease risk of death by about 8 to 17-percent. You could exchange a serving of red meat with a plant-based bean protein for such a change.

Other ways to make sure you have a healthy diet include the following:

  • Limit sugary foods like candy, cola, and ice cream. If you have a sweet tooth, find lower-calorie options like fruits, low sugar dairy products, or flavored teas.
  • Cooking foods with dry cooking methods such as steaming, baking, broiling, or grilling. These dry cooking methods reduce the amount of fat added to foods.
  • Fill most of your plate with plant-based foods such as fruit, veggies, legumes, and whole grains. These foods are lower in fat and higher in fiber than most meat and dairy-based foods.
  • Add in a multivitamin like Zestia from Vita Sciences to fill your nutrition gap. If you are feeling tired, low on energy, or feel like your diet is lacking, a multivitamin can make sure your body gets the nutrition it needs to be its best. Zestia not only contains a full profile of vitamins, but also contains probiotic and Superfood compounds.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

MedLine  Plus (July 12, 2017) “Better Diet, Longer Life” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167146.html

Texas Heart Institute (August 2016) “Minerals: What They Do, Where to Get Them” http://www.texasheart.org/HIC/Topics/HSmart/mineral1.cfm

World Health Organization (accessed July 16, 2017) “Diet, Nutrition, and the prevention of chronic diseases”  http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/publications/trs916/summary/en/


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    Top Three Tips for Keeping your Heart Young

    Heart disease risk increases as you age. Vessels can become more narrow and damaged, while the heart can become thickened and weak. However, a recent study has found that with a little hard work, keeping a young heart into your golden years is possible.

    The American Heart Association states that “Life’s Simple 7” rules can help decrease heart heart, cardiovascular, vessel, cholesterol, diabetesdisease risk.  These rules include:

    • Keeping blood pressure normal
    • Maintaining low cholesterol levels
    • Keeping blood glucose levels down
    • Staying active
    • Eating healthy
    • Losing weight
    • Stopping smoking (or never starting if you don’t smoke)

    A recent review of the Framingham Study found that those individuals who met six out of seven of “Life’s Simple 7” were ten times more likely to maintain healthy blood vessels into old age than those who met none of the goals. Also, out of the 3200 adults aged 50 years and older reviewed, those who maintained the healthiest vessels did the following three things:

    • maintained a healthy weight
    • did not develop diabetes
    • kept cholesterol levels within healthy levels

    Furthermore, those individuals who had healthy blood vessels had more than a 50-percent lower risk of getting heart disease or stroke.  Subjects were thought to have healthy blood vessels if they had normal blood pressure and supple blood vessels as measured by pulse-wave velocity.

    Nearly 20-percent of those who had healthy blood vessels were in the younger end of the group, while only 1-percent were 70 years of age or older. Therefore, it is easy to see that maintaining healthy blood vessels into older age is not easy, but not impossible.

    Follow these tips to help keep young and healthy blood vessels for life:

    • Eat a low sodium and high fiber diet.  Consume mostly fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables for more fiber. In addition, reduce intake of processed foods such as deli meats, boxed goods, packaged snacks, and canned soups. Also, limit fried foods, whole fat dairy products, and fatty meats in your diet. Instead, replace such unhealthy fats with healthier fats such as plant-based oils, avocado, fatty fish such as salmon, nuts, and seeds.
    • Stay active for most days of the week. It is thought that moderate exercise for 30 minutes, 5 days a week can lower risk of getting heart disease or having a stroke. Moderate exercise does not mean boot camp or running. However, simply walking, dancing, gardening, or riding a bike can count as moderate exercise.
    • Take supplements such as Alestra by Vita Sciences. Alestra contains niacin, plant sterols, & garlic that has been found to support healthy cholesterol levels. Also, niacin and plant sterols are vegan-friendly for those who are following a plant-based diet.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    American Heart Association (February 2014) “American Heart Association Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adults” http://www.heart.org

    Mayo Clinic (July 29, 2014) “Heart Disease: Risk Factors” http://www.mayoclinic.org

    MedlinePlus (May 30, 2017) “Can a 70-Year-Old Have the Arteries of a 20-Year-Old?” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166076.html


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    Can Diabetes Affect Your Brain Health?

    Type 2 diabetes is a condition of insulin resistance. This particular condition is  related to obesity and inflammation versus Type 1 diabetes that is insulin-dependent. If uncontrolled, diabetes can lead to conditions such as tingling nerve pain in the hands and feet, slow emptying of the stomach also known as gastroparesis, and increased risk of heart disease. Furthermore, a recent study has found a link between brain health and type 2 diabetes.

    Diabetes and Brain Health

    A 2017 study in Diabetologia looked at Asian adults between the ages of 30 and 60 years old.  This study looked at the brain health of those with diabetes versus those who brain health diet antioxidant diabetesdid not have the condition.  Subjects underwent MRI brain scans and tests to measure memory and thinking skills. Test results showed those with diabetes to have decreased cortical thickness as compared to those without the condition. Furthermore, additional thinning of the temporal lobes was found in overweight and obese subjects with the condition. A 2009 study in Intelligence found that cortical thickness has been linked with cognitive function Therefore, it can be suggested that those with diabetes are at risk for decreased cognitive function if the condition is not controlled.

    How Can Brain Health Be Improved?

    Inflammation and poor blood glucose control affects brain health. Therefore, there are several ways you can protect your brain health:

    • Consume a carbohydrate-controlled diet to better control blood glucose levels. You can control blood glucose levels by limiting concentrated sugar intake and increasing fiber intake. For example, decrease intake of sugary drinks like colas and juices as well as candies and baked sweets that contain concentrated sugars. Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains like quinoa, brown rice, and oats are fiber-rich.
    • Consume antioxidant-rich foods such as fruits and veggies to help decrease inflammation in your diet.  In addition, the omega-3 fatty acids in fatty fish like salmon and in plant-based oils, nuts, and seeds can also prevent the cell damage related to inflammation in the body.
    • Stay active daily to help better control blood glucose levels and to help with stress management.  For example, just 30 minutes of moderate activity like walking for 5 times a week can help you maintain weight, lower stress, strengthen your heart, and in turn decrease inflammation in the body.
    • Take high quality supplements like Glucarex by Vita Sciences to help better control your blood glucose levels. Glucarex contains ingredients like chromium and alpha-lipoic acid, which helps to keep existing blood glucose levels within normal range.

    Visit the American Diabetes Association website for more ways you can control your blood glucose levels and keep your heart and brain in the best health possible.

    -Written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MED, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    American Diabetes Association (accessed April 30, 2017) “Complications” http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/

    Karama, S., et al (2009) “Positive association between cognitive ability and cortical thickness in a representative US sample of healthy 6 to 18 year-olds.” Intelligence, 37(2): 145–155.

    Mayo Clinic (Feb.7, 2017) “Add Antioxidants to Your Diet” http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/multimedia/antioxidants/sls-20076428

    Medline Health News (April 27, 2017) “Type 2 Diabetes May Be Bad for Brain Health” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164982.html


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    Should yearly vision exams be in your diabetes routine?

    Carbohydrate counting, staying active, and checking your blood glucose levels may remind you of the typical diabetes care routine. However, other aspects of diabetes care must not be forgotten. Foot care, dental care, and high cholesterol are just a few other check-ups that are important to diabetes care.

    Those with diabetes are at high risk for foot ulcers due to decreased blood flow to the feet caused by diabetes-related nerve damage. Also, those with diabetes are at greater risk vision, eye exam, eye healththan those without diabetes for gum infections. Furthermore, those with diabetes have been shown to have greater blood vessel damage when they have high cholesterol than those without diabetes.

    Diabetes and Eye Health

    Another important part of diabetes care is regular vision check-ups. This is because those with diabetes are at higher risk for conditions such as glaucoma, cataracts, and retinopathy than those without diabetes.  Diabetes-related nerve damage that occurs as a result of uncontrolled blood glucose levels can greatly impact vision health. According to the National Eye Institute, all forms of diabetic eye disease can lead to severe vision loss and blindness.  However, it is diabetic retinopathy that is the most common cause of vision loss among those with diabetes.

    What is Diabetic Retinopathy?

    The retina is a light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye. The retina detects light and sends a signals through the optic nerve to the brain. Next, the brain converts this electrical signal to an image.  Uncontrolled diabetes damages vessels of the optic nerve, therefore worsening vision.

    When someone has diabetic retinopathy, vessels in the retina swell and leak fluid into the retina. In turn, this fluid distorts vision.  Furthermore, in advanced stages of the disease, scarring of the retina can occur, which can eventually pull the retina away from the underlying tissue, which in turn could lead to blindness.

    Diabetes and eye exams

    A 2017 study in the New England Journal of Medicine observed the vision health of 1400 people with Type 1 diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes, over 30 years.  Biannual retinal photographs and general diabetes health reviews were used to assess vision health. From this study, it was determined that in place of yearly vision exams those with a Hemoglobin A1C, or average blood glucose level over three months of:

    • six-percent or less, without signs of diabetic retinopathy, would be safe getting a vision exam once every four years
    • six-percent or less with mild retinopathy should have vision exams ar least once every three years
    • eight to ten-percent should be screened more often than yearly for their vision health

    In addition to getting regular exams, everyone, no matter their diabetes status should take steps to maintain vision health.  Consuming  vitamin A-rich foods such as brightly-colored veggies like carrots, peppers, and leafy greens is one way to support retinal health. Furthermore, leafy greens, as well as pistachios, contain the eye-healthy antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin that can lower your risk of eye disease. Finally, taking supplements with these eye-healthy nutrients can help you maintain your vision health.

    Vita SciencesOcutain contains both lutein as well as beta-carotene, which support eye health. Also, be sure to visit Vita Sciences for other supplements such as Glucarex, which can support healthy blood glucose levels.

    Also, be sure to visit the American Optometric Association website for further research and information on ways you can maintain vision health.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    American Optometric Association (accessed April 21, 2017) “Lutein & Zeaxanthin.” https://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/caring-for-your-vision/diet-and-nutrition/lutein?sso=y

    Dreher, M.L. (April 2012) “Pistachio nuts: composition and potential health benefits.” Nutrition Reviews, 70(4):234-40.

    Mayo Clinic (December 18, 2014) “Diabetes care: 10 ways to avoid diabetes complications” http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-management/art-20045803

    Medline Health News (April 19, 2017) “Is Annual Eye Exam a Must for People With Type 1 Diabetes?” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164719.html

    National Eye Institute (September 2015) “Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease” https://nei.nih.gov/health/diabetic/retinopathy


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    Can Exercise Prevent Stroke Complications?

    stroke, heart disease, health

    Knowing these signs and symptoms of stroke can help save a life; perhaps even your own.

    I’m sure you have heard many times before how exercising is great for keeping your heart strong. Therefore, it may come as no surprise that exercise has been found to prevent complications after someone has a stroke.

     

    What is a stroke?

    A stroke is essentially a brain attack of which there are two major types.

    A hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a weakened blood vessel bursts.  An ischemic stroke is caused by restricted blood flow to the brain as a result of a vessel being blocked.

    According to the National Stroke Association, these brain attacks are the fifth leading cause of death in America and one of the leading causes of adult disabilities in the country.  Unlike what was previously though, it is estimated that 80-percent of strokes can be prevented by such controllable lifestyle factors as:

    • Eating a healthy diet. To consume a heart and brain healthy diet, you can:
      • Limit saturated fats in the diet such as those from fatty meats, whole fat dairy products, and fried foods.
      • Limit sodium in the diet to 2300 milligrams a day.  You can limit sodium by reducing the amount of processed food products you consume each day.  Try to  limit intake of high sodium foods such as canned soups, chips, deli meats, and adding salt to your food.
      • Limit added sugars at meal and snack time.  Try to stick to foods that contain less than 15 grams of sugar per serving and limit intake of sugary drinks such as juice, cola, milkshakes, and dessert coffee drinks.
    • Stay active. Exercise at least 30 minutes a day for 5 days a week. This doesn’t mean you have to attend boot camp classes. Just walking at a brisk pace is enough to keep your heart strong.
    • Limit alcohol intake. For healthy living, you should consume no more than 1 standard drink a day for women and no more than 2 standard drinks a day for men. Alcohol has been associated with increased blood pressure, which can increase risk of stroke. One standard drink is equal to 12 ounces beer, 5 ounces wine, or 1.5 ounces liquor.
    • Quit smoking or don’t start. Smoking constricts the blood vessels, therefore restricting blood flow to the organs and tissues.
    • Visit your doctor regularly. You and your healthcare provider should work to control any chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes since these conditions can increase your risk of having a stroke.

    Exercise and stroke

    In the journal Neurology, researchers followed individuals with no history of stroke for 12 years.  Over 7-percent of those individuals suffered a stroke and survived during the course of the study.  It was found that three years after this major health event, survivors who had exercised regularly before their stroke were 18 percent more likely to be able to perform basic tasks such as bathing themselves. Furthermore, those individuals who were more fit were 16 percent more likely to be able to perform more complex tasks, such as managing money on their own, compared to those who did not exercise.

    Surprisingly, a person’s body mass index, or estimate of fat mass, was not a predicting factor in their level of disability after having a stroke. Therefore, it is suggested that doctors should stress the importance of leading an active lifestyle for not only prevention of the condition, but also to improve chances of survival if a stroke occurs.

    Another way to help prevent stroke is to take a heart healthy supplement such as Circova by Vita SciencesCircova contains a powerful blend of Hawthorne extract which has been found to assist in the dilation of blood vessels, in turn increasing blood flow to the heart.

    Visit the National Stroke Association website for more information on how you can prevent stroke.

    -Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    National Stroke Association (accessed 2017 April 10) “What is Stroke?” http://www.stroke.org/understand-stroke/what-stroke

    Preidt, R. (2017 April 5) “Fitness, Not Fat, Is Key to Post-Stroke Recovery” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164476.html


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    Could Breakfast Improve Your Heart Health?

    Are you one of the 30-percent of the American adults that skips breakfast? Time and time again you may have heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day.  A recent study has found that breakfast may improve heart health by reducing risk of heart disease.

    Breakfast and Heart Disease Risk

    According to the American Heart Association, eating more in the morning and less at night may reduce the odds for a heart attack, stroke, or other cardiac and blood vessel diseases. This is because those who skip breakfast tend to snack more throughout the day. Furthermore, such snack options may not be the healthiest choices. When people eat breakfast, they have been found less likely to have high cholesterol and high blood pressure. In addition, breakfast eaters tend to have less risk factors for heart disease such as obesity, diabetes, and overall poor nutrition.

    It is thought that meal timing may be the primary reason for this correlation between breakfast eating and lower heart disease risk.  It is thought that humans do not process sugars as well in the night time hours as in the morning. Therefore, a person that eats breakfast will most likely in turn eat a sensibly-sized dinner. This sensible dinner, as opposed to snacking or overeating, will contain less sugar than the latter.  Therefore, breakfast eaters will likely have less chance of elevated blood glucose levels and excessive caloric intake that could lead to obesity and related conditions such as heart disease and diabetes.  However, there is a chance that some individuals that add breakfast could actually gain weight. This is likely related to the food choices and portion sizes that are being made during each meal time.

    What is a healthy breakfast?

    A healthy breakfast, or any healthy meal for that matter, should consist of a good balance of protein and fiber. Protein from lean meats, dairy products, eggs, or plant-based protein such as nuts, seeds, or beans would be balanced along with a fiber-rich serving of whole grains, fruits, or veggies. In addition, limiting salt intake, red meat, as well as high-sugar foods can also reduce risk of heart disease.

    What else can I do to improve heart health?

    Other lifestyle changes that can be made to improve heart health include:

    • planning and prepping meals ahead of time so you do not rely on convenience foods
    • having grab-and-go healthy snacks available if you have a busy schedule; examples include smoothies, portable fruit like apples, oranges, or bananas, or healthy non-perishable protein-rich foods such as nuts, seeds, and low-sodium turkey jerky
    • stopping “kitchen hours” at a certain time to prevent overeating at night and mindless snacking

    Finally, you can also add a heart-healthy supplement to your daily regimen such as Alestra. Alestra is a plant-based supplement containing Gugulipid, niacin, garlic bulb herb powder, cayenne, and phytosterol concentrate.  It works to support healthy cholesterol levels and support heart health. Visit the Vitasciences website for more information on Alestra, or one of their other heart-healthy supplement products.

    Be sure to visit the American Heart Association website at Heart.org for more information on the latest research and other helpful information on ways you can improve your heart health.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    Rapaport, Lisa (2017 Jan 31) “Skipping breakfast may be bad for your health, doctors say” Reuters, http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-cardiovascular-meal-timing-idUSKBN15F2GW

    St.-Onge, M-P, et al. (2017 Jan 30) “Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association.” Circulation, Volume 135: Issue 7.

     

     

     


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    For diabetic neuropathy, R-ALA is an important nutrient.

    20 of the Best Diabetes Websites

    For managing diabetes, information can be a lifesaver. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with diabetes, then it’s important to start educating yourself immediately. If you’ve been managing symptoms of type-1 or type-2 diabetes for years, then it’s helpful to check up on recent medical breakthroughs in glucose management and diabetic neuropathy.

    Listed are 20 influential websites that provide a wealth of tips, resources, and medical advice for all aspects of diabetes. These include advocacy groups, community support forums, links databases, and medical information.

    Tip: If you take metformin, then you may be at risk for severe vitamin B12 deficiency!  Here are some excellent B12 Patches for diabetics, and a vitamin B12 cream

    Nervex is also very helpful for diabetic neuropathy, as it helps to provide natural nutritional support for nerve cell integrity.

    20 of the Best Diabetes Websites

    1. SelfGrowth– Our company’s mission is to provide informative, quality Self Improvement and Natural Health information to help people improve their lives. We provide information ranging from Goal Setting and Stress Management to Natural Health and Alternative Medicine.
    2. Diabetes Self Management– Diabetes Self-Management is a publisher of authoritative, reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.
    3. Healio Diabetes Page– Designed as an in-depth specialty clinical information website, Healio.com features the industry’s best news reporting, dynamic multimedia, question-and-answer columns, CME and other educational activities in a variety of formats, quick reference content, blogs, peer-reviewed journals and a full line of popular book titles.
    4. Physician’s Briefing- Diabetes– By HealthDay, informational website with a large database of medical articles on diabetes and other illnesses.
    5. Pawluk– Board-Certified Family Physician, has training in Acupuncture, homeopathy, hypnosis and bodywork, is a national expert in the medical use of electromagnetics and energy medicine for more than 22 years.
    6. Healing Diabetes– Finding how to cure my diabetes is one of my missions in life and in this blog I share my experiences, research and advice on how to better control glucose and/or cure diabetes.
    7. T Minus Two– Personal blog on diabetes and mental health.
    8. endocrineweb– EndocrineWeb’s goal has been to provide patients with accurate and current information about endocrine disorders. In clear, straightforward language, we explain the causes and symptoms of these disorders and how they can be treated.
    9. Diabetes Developments– blog page for David Mendosa, freelance medical writer, advocate, and consultant specializing in diabetes.
    10. com Diabetes Health– About.com health section, administrated by diabetes expert Barbie Cervoni, RD, CDE.
    11. Healthline Diabetes– Healthline’s mission is to make the people of the world healthier through the power of information. We do this by creating quality health information that is authoritative, approachable, and actionable.
    12. butyoudontlooksick– Creator of the Spoon theory, online magazine about living life to the fullest with any disability, invisible disease, or chronic pain and features a collection of articles, personal stories, book and product reviews, health resource.
    13. American Diabetes Association– Advocacy network with a large selection of information, tips, and awareness campaigns for diabetes.
    14. Neuro Talk- Diabetes/Insulin Resistance / Metabolic Syndrome– Neuropathy community forum, this section focuses on all topics related to diabetes.
    15. Six Until Me– Personal blog about life with type 1 diabetes.
    16. The Girl’s Guide to Diabetes– Personal blog with resources, links and articles for diabetes among women.
    17. The Diabetes Resource– Very large database with hundreds of links to resources, medical articles, and parenting tips for diabetes.
    18. Diabetes Digest– Easy-to-read, up-to-date articles about all aspects of managing your diabetes, including weight control, blood glucose monitoring and medications.
    19. We Are Diabetes– We Are Diabetes is an organization primarily devoted to promoting support and awareness for the eating disorder diabulimia. We are dedicated to providing support, hope and resources to those who suffer from diabulimia, as well as to their families and loved ones.
    20. Children With Diabetes– The online community for kids, families and adults with diabetes.

    Do you have any diabetes pages that you’d like to suggest? Please feel free to comment below!


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    What Causes Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Peripheral neuropathy is caused by damage to the nerves outside of the central nervous system. Autoimmune disorder is one of many conditions linked to peripheral neuropathy, resulting in chronic neuropathic pain, reduced mobility, and organ failure.

    What Causes Peripheral Neuropathy?

    The peripheral nervous system

    The peripheral nervous system connects the central nervous system (spinal cord and brain) to the rest of your body. Everything you touch, taste, smell, and see is filtered through your peripheral nerves. Even your controlled breathing, heart rate, and digestive functions are dependent on having a healthy peripheral nervous system.

    With impaired peripheral nerve cells, you may suffer any of a number of debilitating  painful ailments. Diabetes, pernicious anemia from vitamin B12 deficiency, and alcoholism are a few examples of conditions that cause severe peripheral neuropathy. If treated in time, nerve damage can be minimized or prevented altogether.

    Nerve damage is often preventable and treatable, only if caught on time.

    What causes peripheral neuropathy?

    Listed are some illnesses, lifestyle factors, and medical treatments that are risk factors for peripheral neuropathy.
    Autoimmune disorders

    If you have a history for immune system dysfunction, then your chances of developing neuropathy are higher than others. Intrinsic factor antibody disorder is one such example that occurs when your immune system continuously attacks intrinsic factor, a necessary enzyme for digesting vitamin B12.

    Vitamin B12 is absolutely crucial for protecting the nervous system, as it helps to promote production of myelin, an insulating substance that protects each individual nerve cell. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an illness that breaks down myelin and causes peripheral neuropathy- many doctors believe there is a link between long-term vitamin B12 anemia and MS.

    As vitamin B12 levels plummet, your risk for developing neuropathic pain and damage increases incrementally.

    Tip: If you have a family history for autoimmune disorder, then get tested for serum vitamin B12 regularly, and learn how to recognize the symptoms and causes of peripheral neuropathy.

    Illnesses

    Other illnesses and conditions that may cause peripheral neuropathy are:

    • Diabetes
    • Bell’s palsy
    • Kidney failure
    • Liver failure
    • Rheumatoid arthritis
    • Hepatitis B

    Lifestyle choices

    Alcoholism, smoking cigarettes, and sedentariness can also lead to peripheral neuropathy just by increasing your odds for cancer, organ dysfunction, and diabetes.

    If you follow a vegan diet, then it’s essential to supplement with daily vitamin B12, in order to prevent peripheral neuropathy caused by vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Medicine and surgery

    Certain medications indirectly cause peripheral neuropathy by making you a high risk factor for vitamin B12 anemia. If you have been taking any prescription medication for several months, then ask your doctor to list all possible side effects that can occur over a long period of time.

    Read List of Medications that Trigger Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    If you have elected for gastrointestinal surgery, either for treatment of Crohn’s or for weight loss (gastric bypass), then it’s vitally important to take highly-digestible forms of vitamin B12 in order to prevent peripheral neuropathy.

    Cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation treatments often result in peripheral nerve damage.

    Sometimes, during surgery, a doctor may accidentally strike a nerve, causing nerve damage that can be difficult to treat later.

    What else causes peripheral neuropathy?

    Please feel free to post questions or comments below.

    Image by renjith krishnan


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