Tag Archives: vitamin D

Could low vitamin D increase your diabetes risk?

It’s that time of year when the sun is shining more during the day and people are outdoors more often.  This fresh air and sunshine is not just good for your well being, but a study has also shown that without enough of the sunshine vitamin, vitamin D, you may increase your risk of type 2 diabetes.

What is vitamin D?

vitamin D, egg, fish, cheese, cod liver oil, sun, health, dairy, milk, yogurtVitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is best know for its role in keeping bones healthy.  This vitamin helps improve calcium absorption in the gut, which helps with bone growth and bone remodeling. Without vitamin D, you may be at risk for weak bones, and in turn increase your risk of fractures.

The recommended intake of vitamin D is 600-800 IUs, or International Units, for most adults. You can find vitamin D in such foods as:

  • Fortified dairy products, orange juice, or cereal.
  • Eggs (vitamin D is in the yolk).
  • Fatty fish like salmon, tuna fish, swordfish, and cod liver oil.

You can also get your recommended vitamin D intake from getting about 5 to 30 minutes of sun exposure in the day time between 10 AM and 3 PM.  You should do this at least twice a week to the face, arms, legs, or back without sunscreen.

Those at risk for low vitamin D include those who do not go outdoors often such as the elderly, immobile, or disabled.  Breastfed infants, those with fat or vitamin absorption issues, and those with dark skin are also at risk for low vitamin D. Although sunlight exposure can be absorbed in cloudy weather, people living in these climates may be at greater risk for low vitamin D than those who live in sunny regions since they may not be outdoors as often due to the weather.

A normal vitamin D level is around 50 nmol/L.  If you are vitamin D-deficient, then your healthcare provider may give you a vitamin D supplement to take daily. The vitamin D lab may not be a standard lab taken at your physical, so you may have to ask your doctor to perform this lab separately.

Low vitamin D and diabetes risk

A study of people with diabetes and pre diabetes looked at the link between vitamin D and diabetes risk. Study results show that as vitamin D levels increased, the lower the risk of diabetes. In fact, those people with a vitamin D level less than or equal to 30 nmol/L were about three times more likely to have diabetes than those with a level higher than 30nmol/L.  Those people with a vitamin D level greater than 50nmol/L had the lowest risk of getting diabetes.

Other ways to lower your diabetes risk

Besides getting your vitamin D within normal levels, use the following tips to lower your risk of diabetes:

  • Lose weight if you are overweight or obese. Even a 5-10-percent weight loss can help lower your diabetes risk.
  • Eat fewer calories each day. This does not mean starve or deprive yourself, since this will wreak havoc on your metabolism over time. Just control your portions each day by following the guidelines on the MyPlate website.  You can ask a registered dietitian or your healthcare provider for more information on how many calories you should be eating each day for optimal health.
  • Be more active each day. Walk whenever you can since every step counts. Staying active helps to keep your blood glucose levels more stable and keeps your heart strong. Staying active can surprisingly help you feel more energy and in turn, can help you manage your weight better.
  • Take a supplement to help lower your sugar.  Your healthcare provider can prescribe a medicine for your blood glucose levels if they feel it is needed to prevent diabetes. However, you can also try a supplement like Glucarex by Vita Sciences. Glucarex contains ingredients like cinnamon, chromium, and alpha lipoic acid that can naturally support weight loss, healthy metabolism, and healthy blood glucose levels.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

National Institutes of Health (March 2, 2018) “Vitamin D- Fact Sheet for Health Professionals.”

National Institutes of Health (November 2016) “Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes.”

Park, S.K., et al. (April 19, 2018) “Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and risk of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes: 12-year cohort study.” https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0193070

 


  • Could Vitamin D3 Help Repair Blood Vessels?

    vitamin d, fish, fish oil, dairy, milk, orange juice, heart healthVitamin D, known as the sunshine vitamin, is a very important nutrient for overall health. Best known for its work in helping strengthen bones and teeth, vitamin D is starting to get more attention for other benefits it could provide.  A recent study reports that cells damaged by heart attack or stroke may be repaired by vitamin D3.

    What is vitamin D?

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that you can not find in many foods. However, vitamin D is important for many functions such as bone health.  It is called the ‘sunshine vitamin” by some because it can be absorbed into the body through sunlight exposure. Because of this, those who live in cloudy climates or do not leave the house often may be low in vitamin D.  You can find Vitamin D in such foods as fortified milk, yogurt, or orange juice, as well as fatty fish such as salmon or trout.  Cod liver oil is also a good source of vitamin D.

    Most adults should get at least 600 International Units (IU) of vitamin D each day. Vitamin D is not a standard lab you will get at your annual visit. Therefore, you may have to ask for the vitamin D lab.  You will be prescribed a vitamin D supplement if labs find you to be low.  Research shows that vitamin D3 is absorbed better than vitamin D2, so it is the preferred choice for a supplement. You can find Vitamin D3 in a variety of forms such as:

    Maxasorb comes in 1000 IU and 2000 IU formulas and can be conveniently rubbed on the skin like a lotion.

    Endothelial cells and vitamin D3

    An innovative study tracked single endothelial cells, or blood vessel cells, to see the impact of vitamin D3 on their health status.  Heart health events such as heart attack or stroke as well as conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure can damage such cells.  The study showed that vitamin D3 helped such cells repair themselves from such damage. Also, the study found that the vitamin lowers oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system by stimulating nitric oxide (NO) levels.  This turn of events increases blood flow and protects the blood vessels from damage. Recent findings also show that a deficiency of vitamin may increase risk of a heart attack and may reveal a link to depression. Therefore, taking a vitamin D3 supplement may greatly benefit many aspects of health.

    Other ways to improve your heart health

    Although vitamin D is important, there are many other ways you can improve your heart health.

    • Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables since such foods are rich in fiber. A fiber-filled diet is good for digestive health, keeps you fuller longer, and in turn can help you maintain a healthy weight. A fiber rich diet can also help you control blood glucose levels and keep cholesterol at healthy levels.
    • Stay active often at least 15 to 30 minutes a day most days of the week. No need to be in a boot camp exercise program.  Engage in simple exercises such as walking, water aerobics, gardening, dancing, to name a few to help keep your heart healthy.
    • Drink more water and less alcohol to not only help manage your weight, but also to stay hydrated and keep your liver healthy as well.
    • Don’t smoke or quit smoking since this unhealthy behavior can constrict blood vessels and in turn increase blood pressure levels.
    • Maintain a healthy weight by performing all of the healthy lifestyle behaviors mentioned above since less body weight places less pressure on your heart, and in turn can help lower your risk of heart disease and related conditions.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    DiSalvo, D. (January 31, 2018) “Study Examines Vitamin D3’s Potential Effects On Blood Vessels.”  Forbes.com

    Harvard Health Publishing: Harvard Medical School (accessed February 5, 2018) ” These five habits can save your heart- here’s how.” 

    National Institutes of Health: Office of Dietary Supplements (February 11, 2016) “Vitamin D”

    Tripkovic, Laura et al. (June 2012) “Comparison of Vitamin D2 and Vitamin D3Supplementation in Raising Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 95.6 (2012): 1357–1364. PMC. Web. 5 Feb. 2018.

     


  • Could Vitamin D Help IBS Symptoms?

    constipation, diarrhea, abdominal pain, cramps, stomachache, irritable bowel syndrome, healthDo you get stabbing abdominal cramps after eating a fatty meal?  Does dairy or gluten cause uncomfortable gas and bloating?  Are doctors unsure of the origin of your chronic constipation or diarrhea? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you may have what is called Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).  Although changes in the diet may be helpful in many cases of IBS, research shows that vitamin D may also help those with this condition.

    What is Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disorder of the large intestine.  If someone is suffering from the following symptoms, then they may have IBS.

    • abdominal pain, cramping, or bloating
    • less pain after bowel movement
    • excess gas
    • diarrhea or constipation, or a little of both
    • mucus in the stool

    A diagnosis of IBS is usually given after testing has found that such symptoms are not related to another condition. Other conditions where such symptoms may be present include:

    • inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis
    • celiac disease
    • malabsorption
    • colon cancer

    What is Vitamin D?

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is well-known for its link to bone health.  D rich foods include:

    • vitamin D-fortified milk, orange juice, and yogurt
    • fatty fish like tuna and salmon.
    • cod liver oil

    However, sunlight exposure can also provide vitamin D. Those who live in cloudy climates may have trouble doing this though. Therefore, vitamin D-rich foods and supplements may be needed for some to meet their vitamin D needs.  Research suggests that just 5 to 30 minutes of sunlight twice a week can help a person meet their vitamin D needs.

    Ostoeporosis is a common condition linked to vitamin D deficiency. However preliminary evidence has also linked low vitamin D to diabetes, hypertension, and glucose intolerance.  Recent recommendations suggest that most adults should consume at least 600IU a day. Although, those with a low vitamin D level may require up to 4000 IU/day to help them normalize their levels.

    It is important to ask your doctor for a vitamin D test at your annual visit. This is because vitamin D is not a typical test that healthcare providers include in your common annual visit lab panel. If you fail to get a vitamin D level test, then you may never know if symptoms such as weakness or bone pain could be helped with vitamin D treatment.

    Vitamin D and IBS Research

    A study in the European Journal of Clinical Medicine has found a possible link between vitamin D deficiency and IBS. An analysis of four observational studies and three randomized controlled trials found a link between vitamin D deficiency in IBS patients. Furthermore, high dose vitamin D supplements were found to help ease IBS symptoms such as bloating, diarrhea, and constipation.

    Even though evidence is limited, researchers suggest that anyone with IBS symptoms should get tested for vitamin D.  If you have low vitamin D, you may be prescribed a Vitamin D supplement, or asked to purchase an over-the-counter softgel or liquid supplement. You can also purchase vitamin D in an absorbable cream like Maxasorb by Vita Sciences. Maxasorb comes in 1000IU or 2000IU and provides a convenient way to take your vitamin D daily.

    Other Ways to Help Your IBS

    In addition to keeping an eye on your vitamin D levels, there are other ways to help control your IBS symptoms.

    • Increase fiber intake by adding in more whole grains like oats and quinoa, along with plenty of fruits and vegetables. Fiber can help bulk stool and make it easier to pass.
    • Drink plenty of water each day to help flush waste out of your body, along with water’s other very important functions.  It is especially important to increase water intake as you increase fiber intake. If you increase fiber intake without drinking enough water, this could worsen constipation symptoms in some people. An easy rule of thumb is to drink half of your body weight (in pounds) in ounces. For example, if you weigh 200 lbs, you should drink 100 ounces, or about 12 cups of fluid each day. This fluid could include:
      • water or low-calorie flavored water
      • unsweetened tea, hot tea, or herbal tea
      • broth or boullion
      • decaf coffee
      • other low-calorie, low sugar drinks that do not contain caffeine or alcohol
    • Exercise on a regular basis. Exercise can help promote healthy bowel movements in those who have constipation.  Any movement counts, so get outside and take a walk, dance in your living room to a workout tape or to the radio, or go to the gym and join a group class. Whatever movement is fun to you, is movement that you will stick with for the long run.
    • Get plenty of sleep. Most adults need at least seven hours of sleep each day for good health. Sleep helps your body regulate fluids, blood pressure, blood glucose levels, as well as digestion. Therefore, not enough sleep could be affecting your gut health.
    • Start on a probiotic since the gut may be lacking the good bacteria it needs for healthy digestion. Ask your healthcare provider for specific brands of probiotics they may recommend. You can also check out Vita Sciences for gut health aids such as Biovia 30.
    • Eliminate certain foods from your diet. These foods may vary from person to person, depending on your specific allergies or intolerances. However, some common food triggers of IBS include:
      • FODMAPs, or fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols found in certain fruits, vegetables, grains, or dairy products
      • gluten-containing foods such as breads, pastas, and baked goods
      • gassy foods such as alcohol, carbonated beverages, or certain vegetables such as cauliflower and cabbage

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    Mayo Clinic (November 18. 2017) “Irritable Bowel Syndrome.”

    Medline Plus (accessed January 29, 2018) “Digestive Diseases.”

    National Institutes of Health: Office of Dietary Supplements (February 11, 2016) “Vitamin D- Fact Sheet for Health Professionals.” 

    Williams CE, et al. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018;doi:10.1038/s41430-017-0064-z.


  • Is Calories In, Calories Out the Key to Losing Weight?

    weight loss, apple, nutrition, orange, calorieIf you have ever tried to lose weight, then you probably have been told to track your calories. Most calorie trackers focus on keeping track of the calories you consume through food.  On the other hand, fitness trackers or workout machines may track how many calories you burn during the day. However, is there more to the story of weight loss, or is calories in and calories out the only key to success?  A recent report by health experts reveal that there may be more than simple math in the weight loss equation.

    What are is a calorie?

    A calorie is a unit of energy that is found in food and beverages. The four major macronutrients that consist of calories include:

    • protein at 4 calories per gram
    • carbohydrate at around 4 calories per gram
    • fat at 7 calories per gram
    • alcohol at 9 calories per gram

    Whatever calories you consume that are not used as energy are stored in the body as fat. In simple terms, you may lose fat stores if you consume less calories than you burn.  Calories can be burned by physical activity, but calorie expenditure may also increase in those who are growing, injured, or ill.  This is because your body will need more energy to support such processes that involve cell reproduction and other related processes.

    Are some calories healthier than others?

    Not all calories are created equal. The recent report reveals a growing trend of people focusing solely on the number of calories in and calories out, rather than the quality of calories consumed. Although this may lead to a calorie deficit, and in turn weight loss, it is not necessarily healthy.

    For example, a piece of candy and an apple may both contain 100 calories. However, the candy mostly contains empty calories because they contain little to no nutritional value. The calories in the candy are mainly from simple carbohydrates like sugar as well as fat.  However, in the apple, those same calories contain many nutrients such as fiber, vitamin C, and potassium. Therefore, the calories from the apple will provide your body with more health benefits than the candy.

    Weighing in on the “Calories In, Calories Out” equation

    The latest diet craze known as CICO (Calories In, Calories Out), may lead to vitamin and nutrient deficiencies according to experts. If you are not looking at the nutrient quality of the calories you consume, then you may increase your risk of heart disease, osteoporosis, anemia, to name a few. In addition, if you restrict yourself of too many calories, then you may develop fatigue and malnutrition, which does your body more harm than good. Contact a registered dietitian to help you determine how many calories you need to support your lifestyle, while still helping you to lose any excess weight.

    How to Work on Weight Loss

    There is no one size fits all plan to help everyone lose weight. However, there are several things you can do today to get on the right track towards healthy weight loss and maintenance.

    • Watch your portion sizes at meals and snacks. A simple way to determine how much food you need to eat at each meal involves your protein and fiber needs. Most adults should consume at least 25 grams of fiber a day through whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Your protein needs, in grams, can be determined by dividing your weight in pounds by 2.75.  Once you determine your fiber and protein needs, use a nutrition tracker to ensure you meet these needs with mostly whole foods, or foods that are minimally processed.  Also, chew your food more per bite, slow your pace of eating to 20-25 minutes per meal, and be mindful of the food choices you make by looking at nutrition labels before you make food purchases.
    • Stay active most days of the week.  Balance out each week with cardiovascular and resistance exercises. Cardio exercises include walking, jogging, swimming, or biking. These exercises work to increase calorie burn. Resistance exercises, on the other hand, such as lifting weights, doing push-ups, or using resistance bands, help to maintain lean muscle mass. Maintaining your muscle mass as you lose weight helps you to maintain calorie-burning power, also known as metabolism.
    • Get plenty of sleep.  Weight loss may be more difficult for those who do not sleep well.  This is because lack of sleep can disrupt the hormones that control hunger and appetite. Try to get at least 6-8 hours of sleep each night. If you have trouble sleeping due to visiting the bathroom regularly, stop drinking fluids at least 2 hours before bedtime.  If pain is keeping you up, visit your doctor to get support.  If you are not sure what is causing your restless sleep, you may have sleep apnea. You can ask your doctor about getting a sleep study done to determine the cause of your sleepless nights.
    • Visit your doctor if diet and exercise are not leading to weight loss. If calories in and calories out are leading to weight plateaus or gains, then there may be an underlying health issue. Research has shown that some people who have a family history of obesity may have a harder time losing weight than those that don’t. This could be due to:
      • genetic factors.
      • increased risk of conditions like hypothyroidism or insulin resistance.
      • environmental factors such as growing up without knowledge of healthy eating behaviors.
    • Fill in your nutrient gaps with vitamins and supplements. At the very least, take a multivitamin such as Zestia by VitaSciences. Zestia contains a blend of Super Food extracts, probiotics, and digestive enzymes helps to support optimal health. If you live in a climate with little sunlight, you may also need to add a vitamin D3 supplement to your daily routine.  Low vitamin D levels can affect many aspects of health such as bone and immune health, to name a few.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (November 16, 2016) “Finding a Balance” 

    Harvard Health Publishing: Harvard Medical School (May 2014) “Eating fiber-rich foods helps keep the heart healthy”

    Harvard Health Publishing: Harvard Medical School (updated April 11, 2017) “Why People Become Overweight” 

    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (accessed November 27, 2017) “Protein”

    Medline Health News (November 22, 2017) “It’s the Latest Diet Craze, But Is It Safe?”

    Medline Plus (accessed November 28, 2017) “Vitamin D” 

     

     


  • Could your job be causing your vitamin deficiency?

    vitamin D, vitamin, deficiencyDo you spend most of your time indoors?  Does your job involve sitting at a desk all day seeing only the light from your desk lamp? If you do work indoors often, do you find yourself getting easily tired, maybe having joint aches and pains, or trouble controlling your blood glucose levels?  A recent study has found that your office job could be robbing you of the sunshine vitamin D and may be in turn causing a vitamin D deficiency.

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin seen in very few foods such as:

    • salmon
    • tuna
    • dairy products
    • egg yolks
    • fortified cereal products

    Therefore, most of the vitamin D your body absorbs is likely coming from sunlight or from supplements.  However, if you are mostly indoors during your day, you may be missing out on the health benefits of vitamin D. Some of the functions of vitamin D include bone strength, immune function, and reduction of inflammation.  Therefore, when you do not have enough vitamin D in your body, you may have increased risk of chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. This is because such chronic diseases stem from inflammation in the body.

    A recent study in the journal BMC Public Health looked at 71 previous studies and found vitamin D deficiency in over three-fourths of shift workers and indoor workers. In addition, over two-thirds of health care students were vitamin D deficient. Furthermore, even nearly half of outdoor workers had vitamin D deficiency. They think that use of sunscreen and limited outdoor time may be causing such a high rate of vitamin D deficiency. However, researchers also warn people of the risks of skin cancers from too much exposure to sunlight. Therefore, vitamin D supplements are an option for those who are low in vitamin D. Most adults should get around 600 IU vitamin D daily. Your doctor however may suggest more if they feel you may be more at risk for low vitamin D.

    Another way you can get vitamin D is through a supplements such as Osteovent from Vita Sciences. Osteovent not only contains vitamin D3, but also bone health calcium and magnesium.  This formula, which also contains vitamin K and boron, has been shown to promote bone strength.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    Medline Health News (June 22, 2017) “Could Your Job Rob You of Vitamin D?” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166833.html

    National Institutes of Health (February 11, 2016) “Vitamin D” https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/


  • Could vitamin D protect against bone loss?

    Are you one of the 44 million Americans with low one density?  If so, and if you are over the age of 50, you could be one of the 10 million Americans with osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a dangerous condition in which your bones become fragile and at risk for fractures.  In older individuals, osteoporosis can lead to hip fractures that can limit mobility, or even spine fractures that could be debilitating.  Older women at are most risk for osteoporosis, but this condition can occur to both men and women at any age.

    osteoporosis, vitamin D, bone health

    Osteoporosis can weaken bone strength over time increasing risk of hip, wrist, and spinal fractures.

    If you want to prevent osteoporosis, there are a few controllable factors that you can take charge of to lower your risk.

    • Quit smoking or don’t start if you don’t smoke.
    • Limit drinking alcohol.
    • Eat a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D

    A recent study by researchers from Harvard-affiliated Hebrew Senior Life found that older adults who consumed calcium-rich foods such as yogurt, milk, or cheese had higher bone mineral density in the spine and less bone loss in the hip.  However, this risk was only reduced significantly along with consumption of vitamin D supplementation. It is suspected that this finding is due to vitamin D’s important function of assisting with calcium absorption.  Without vitamin D, our body cannot adequately absorb all of the calcium goodness from the foods that we eat. In turn, our bones cannot receive the strengthening elements of calcium needed to preserve bone and prevent bone loss.

    If you are not sure if you are vitamin D deficient, be sure to check with your healthcare provider.  Furthermore, if you are vitamin D deficient, it will be important to start on a vitamin D supplementation regimen.  However, check with your healthcare provider to find a regimen that will be best for you. Other ways to increase vitamin D include consuming foods rich in the vitamin such as:

    • fish oils
    • fatty fish
    • mushrooms
    • beef liver
    • cheese
    • egg yolks
    • fortified milk

    Also, by increasing your sunlight exposure you can naturally increase your daily intake of vitamin D.   However, the amount of sunlight exposure needed to provide the most benefit will differ for everyone.   This is because the time of day, where you live, and skin pigmentation can all affect the amount of vitamin D your skin makes.

    Furthermore, pair your healthy bone regimen with a supplement like Osteovent from Vita Sciences. Osteovent is power-packed with bone healthy vitamins such as vitamin D, calcium, magnesium, vitamin K, and boron that are recommended by the Open Orthopaedics Journal.

    Visit the National Osteoporosis Foundation website for all of the great work they are doing to help increase awareness of osteoporosis and improve bone health efforts.

    Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    National Institutes of Health (2017 March 1). “Older Bones Benefit from Dairy Plus Vitamin D” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163861.html

    National Institutes of Health Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center (2014 Nov). “What is Osteoporosis? Fast Facts: An Easy to Read Series of Publications for the Public” https://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/bone/osteoporosis/osteoporosis_ff.asp

    Calcium/Vitamin D