Tag Archives: nutrition

Seven ways to improve long term weight loss and management

weight loss, weight, health, diet, nutritionWith the summer months approaching and weather warming, weight loss may be on your mind.  With every click of the remote, there are commercials advertising weight loss plans, exercise equipment, and fat burning supplements claiming to help you manage your weight. However, a recent study has shown that regular eating versus dieting may be the answer to long term weight loss and management.

Dieting Versus Regular Eating

A study at the University of Helsinki looked at the factors of weight and weight change in 4900 young men and women. The study involved the participants taking surveys at age 24 and 34, and weight measurements at the time the surveys were conducted. Study results show that most people gained weight in the decade in between. The factors that affected such weight gain include:

  • dieting and irregular eating habits
  • giving birth to two or more children
  • regular intake of sweetened beverages
  • poor contentment with life
  • smoking

The results show that those who were protected from weight gain and had weight maintenance or weight loss had similar characteristics such as:

  • physical activity in women
  • higher level of education in men
  • greater weight at the start of the study in men

Therefore, the study suggests that eating healthy foods on a regular basis and avoiding dieting is the first step to long term weight management.

Seven Ways to Manage Your Weight Long Term

The findings of this recent study show that the following five ways are the cornerstone to managing your weight for the long term.

  • Eating on a regular basis such as every 3 to 4 hours can help prevent overeating. You should consume a balanced diet of fiber-rich fruits and vegetables as well as adequate lean proteins each day. Such proteins may include animal products such as eggs, poultry, fish, seafood, and lean beef. However, if you are vegetarian, you can get plenty of protein from low fat dairy, soybeans and soy based products such as tofu, nuts, and seeds. Furthermore, you should limit your intake of processed products to reduce your total daily intake of sodium and sugar.
  • Reducing intake of sugary beverages is the logical next step to help manage your weight.  This means limiting sugary colas, juices, and pretty much any processed foods with added sugars. You can find the amount of added sugar on the nutrition label of most products. Stick to water, unsweetened tea and lemonade, or other low-calories beverages for your fluid intake. You should drink about half of your body weight in pounds in fluid each day. Therefore, if you weigh 200 lbs, then you should drink about 100 ounces of low-to no calorie fluid each day, or about 12.5 cups of fluid each day.
  • Staying active is vital for managing weight. You should engage in at least 30 minutes total of moderate activity daily such as walking, gardening, light biking, or other activities that increase heart rate to a point where you can still hold a conversation, but not sing. This 30 minutes does not have to be all at once, but can be in 5 to 10 minute intervals throughout the day. Exercise is important for providing a calorie deficit to help lose weight and is also important for heart health.
  • Not smoking and limiting other unhealthy lifestyle factors such as drinking alcohol is important for managing weight since these factors affect heart health and overall health status. Smoking can narrow blood vessels and increase blood pressure. It can also sap your energy since it makes it harder for your heart to get oxygen to your body’s tissues and affects lung health. Drinking alcohol is full of unnecessary calories and if consumed in excess can affect liver health. Your liver is in charge of breaking down fat and getting toxins out of the body. If your liver will rid of toxins before anything, so if you drink too much, your liver will not have much time for fat metabolism. This can lead to fat storage and weight gain, especially in the abdominal area.
  • Managing stress can help you manage weight and gain a more positive perspective on your life. Relaxation breathing, yoga, or talking with a counselor can help you better manage stress and in turn lower your risk of chronic conditions such as heart disease and stroke.

Two other important factors that can affect weight management are:

  • Sleep. Most adults are recommended to get 7 to 9 hours of sleep every night. Lack of sleep can increase risk of chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, and obesity.  Also,  lack of sleep can make it difficult to manage stress and stick to a healthy eating and exercise plan.
  • Nutrient status.  Vitamin deficiencies, such as iron, vitamin D, or B12, can impact health by reducing energy. In fact, obese patients commonly have these vitamin deficiencies before weight loss intervention.  You should get a lab test for these vitamins and nutrients at your annual doctor visit. Also, if you are low in such nutrients, you should start on a regular vitamin regimen. One supplement that may be helpful in getting your weight back on track is Kolonex by Vita Sciences. Kolonex is an advanced colon cleanser and detox supplement that contains psyllium husk and probiotics to help promote weight loss, less bloating, and more energy.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control (September 8, 2016) “Healthy Eating for a Healthy Weight.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine (September 14, 2015) “Nutritional Deficiencies Common Before Weight Loss Surgery.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (accessed March 26, 2018) “Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency.” 

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (accessed by March 26, 2018) “Some Myths about Nutrition and Physical Activity.”

National Sleep Foundation (accessed March 26, 2018) “How Much Sleep Do We Really Need?”

Science Daily (March 23, 2018) “Searching for long-term success in weight management? Forget dieting and eat regularly.”


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    Could a new diabetes medicine help you lose weight?

    nutrition, dietitian, health, diabetes, diet, weight lossWhen you have diabetes and are overweight, your doctor may say that a small amount of weight loss could help control your condition. However, if you have to take insulin to control your blood glucose levels, weight loss can be very difficult. Therefore, it is encouraging to report that a new diabetes medicine may help those with diabetes who are obese to lose weight.

    Insulin and Weight Gain

    According to Joslin Diabetes Center, those with diabetes on insulin may have a challenging time losing weight. This is because when people with diabetes first start taking insulin, the body is finally getting the glucose in the cells where it was previously low. In turn, this energy that the cells start taking in lead to weight gain. It is important to note though, that an initial weight gain with the start of insulin treatment is a good sign that the body is working to get your blood glucose levels back in control. However, weight loss is not impossible for those with diabetes on insulin. With the proper supervision and treatment plan by your diabetes health care provider, those with diabetes can lose weight.

    Diabetes Medicine and Weight Loss Research

    A recent study found that a new diabetes medicine may help those who are obese without diabetes to lose weight. This new diabetes medicine, semaglutide, has a similar chemical structure to the hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). GLP-1 helps to regulate secretion of insulin as well as appetite. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the semaglutide injection Ozempic as a once-weekly supplement to diet and exercise to help those with type 2 diabetes control their blood glucose levels.

    The one-year study done on semaglutide looked at nearly 1000 participants with obesity and without diabetes. Study results found that this treatment was effective as a weight loss treatment.  Different study groups were given different dosages of the treatment (.05-.4 milligrams injection daily).  Comparison groups were given  a placebo or a different diabetes medicine called liraglutide. All groups were provided monthly diet and exercise counseling.

    • All groups that received semaglutide lost significantly more weight than those in the placebo group.
    • The highest dose group (.4 milligram injection daily) lost the most weight, nearly 5 times more than the placebo group.
    • Researchers suggest that more studies could help fully explore the weight loss potential of semaglutide.

    Other Ways to Lose Weight With Diabetes

    Outside of prescription medicines, there are several lifestyle factors that can be adjusted to help those with diabetes lose weight.

    • Eat a healthier diet. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), those with diabetes should work with their doctor and a dietitian. They can help you learn how to create a healthy, balanced meal plan.  A diabetes-friendly meal plan should focus on healthy carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables, fiber-rich whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy.  Learning appropriate portion sizes and limiting eating out are other strategies to help you lose weight.
    • Exercise more.  When you exercise, insulin becomes more sensitive. In other words, exercise helps your muscle cells to better use the available insulin. In turn, the insulin works to better take up glucose into the cells and use it as energy during and after activity. This helps lower your blood glucose levels. However, it is important to note that those taking insulin to help control their blood glucose levels should adjust their insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake around the time they exercise to avoid a glucose low, or hypoglycemia.  Check out the American Diabetes Association site or talk to your healthcare provider about ways to avoid hypoglycemia during and after exercise.
    • Drink plenty of water each day to help prevent drinking your calories from sugary drinks. Most of your body is made up of water. Therefore, drinking plenty of water each day can help you maintain optimal health. In addition, people with diabetes need more water when blood glucose levels are high.  Studies show that increased water intake can help those with diabetes better control blood glucose levels.  The average adult should drink about half of your body weight in ounces of water each day. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, then you should drink 100 ounces of fluid each day, or about 12.5 cups of water. Increased water intake can also help you feel fuller longer and prevent dehydration. In turn, increased water intake can help you manage you weight and increase energy over time.
    • Take diabetes-friendly supplements such as Glucarex by Vita Sciences. Glucarex contains compounds such as chromium, alpha lipoic aicd and cinnamon to help support blood glucose levels. Such ingredients can help support weight loss and a healthy metabolism.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    American Diabetes Association (last edited September 25, 2017) “Blood Glucose and Exercise.”

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (December 18, 2017) “Eat Well!”

    Diabetes.co.uk (accessed March 19, 2018) “Water and Diabetes.”

    Joslin Diabetes Center (accessed March 19, 2018) “Insulin and Weight Gain.”

    Science Daily (March 18, 2018) “New diabetes drug may help people with obesity lose weight.”


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    Can Eating Healthy Lengthen Life?

    Many diet programs claim to help you lose weight, prevent chronic disease, and improve your overall well-being. However, could eating a healthy diet lengthen your life? A recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine reveals that healthy eating can extend life.hypertension, heart, blood pressure

    Nutrition affects overall health in many ways. For example, those with diabetes must control intake of sugar. Therefore, natural sugars from fruits, veggies, and dairy products should be eaten versus processed sugars from colas, candy, and other sweets. On the other hand, those with high blood pressure should have a lower sodium diet. You can lower sodium in your diet by eating less processed food products such as deli meats, fast foods, and canned soups.

    Vitamins and minerals from the food you eat help keep your body alive. Calcium and vitamin D keeps bones strong, while vitamin C provides immune protection.  Also, magnesium helps the body to use glucose efficiently, while potassium helps produce energy and nerve impulses.

    A recent study looked at 74,000 people over 12 years, during which 10,000 of them died. The review of the study looked at the dietary habits of the people in the previous 12 years of their life before the study. Those who added more fiber-rich fruits, veggies, and whole grains had a lower risk of death than those whose diets stayed the same.

    The Alternate Healthy Eating Index, Alternate Mediterranean Diet Index, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Diet Index set the score of the diets reviewed. Fruits, veggies, whole grains, healthy fats, and other whole foods got higher scores.  On the other hand, unhealthy processed, fatty and sugary foods got lower scores. A minor 20-percent change in diet helped decrease risk of death by about 8 to 17-percent. You could exchange a serving of red meat with a plant-based bean protein for such a change.

    Other ways to make sure you have a healthy diet include the following:

    • Limit sugary foods like candy, cola, and ice cream. If you have a sweet tooth, find lower-calorie options like fruits, low sugar dairy products, or flavored teas.
    • Cooking foods with dry cooking methods such as steaming, baking, broiling, or grilling. These dry cooking methods reduce the amount of fat added to foods.
    • Fill most of your plate with plant-based foods such as fruit, veggies, legumes, and whole grains. These foods are lower in fat and higher in fiber than most meat and dairy-based foods.
    • Add in a multivitamin like Zestia from Vita Sciences to fill your nutrition gap. If you are feeling tired, low on energy, or feel like your diet is lacking, a multivitamin can make sure your body gets the nutrition it needs to be its best. Zestia not only contains a full profile of vitamins, but also contains probiotic and Superfood compounds.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    MedLine  Plus (July 12, 2017) “Better Diet, Longer Life” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167146.html

    Texas Heart Institute (August 2016) “Minerals: What They Do, Where to Get Them” http://www.texasheart.org/HIC/Topics/HSmart/mineral1.cfm

    World Health Organization (accessed July 16, 2017) “Diet, Nutrition, and the prevention of chronic diseases”  http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/publications/trs916/summary/en/


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    Could Breakfast Improve Your Heart Health?

    Are you one of the 30-percent of the American adults that skips breakfast? Time and time again you may have heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day.  A recent study has found that breakfast may improve heart health by reducing risk of heart disease.

    Breakfast and Heart Disease Risk

    According to the American Heart Association, eating more in the morning and less at night may reduce the odds for a heart attack, stroke, or other cardiac and blood vessel diseases. This is because those who skip breakfast tend to snack more throughout the day. Furthermore, such snack options may not be the healthiest choices. When people eat breakfast, they have been found less likely to have high cholesterol and high blood pressure. In addition, breakfast eaters tend to have less risk factors for heart disease such as obesity, diabetes, and overall poor nutrition.

    It is thought that meal timing may be the primary reason for this correlation between breakfast eating and lower heart disease risk.  It is thought that humans do not process sugars as well in the night time hours as in the morning. Therefore, a person that eats breakfast will most likely in turn eat a sensibly-sized dinner. This sensible dinner, as opposed to snacking or overeating, will contain less sugar than the latter.  Therefore, breakfast eaters will likely have less chance of elevated blood glucose levels and excessive caloric intake that could lead to obesity and related conditions such as heart disease and diabetes.  However, there is a chance that some individuals that add breakfast could actually gain weight. This is likely related to the food choices and portion sizes that are being made during each meal time.

    What is a healthy breakfast?

    A healthy breakfast, or any healthy meal for that matter, should consist of a good balance of protein and fiber. Protein from lean meats, dairy products, eggs, or plant-based protein such as nuts, seeds, or beans would be balanced along with a fiber-rich serving of whole grains, fruits, or veggies. In addition, limiting salt intake, red meat, as well as high-sugar foods can also reduce risk of heart disease.

    What else can I do to improve heart health?

    Other lifestyle changes that can be made to improve heart health include:

    • planning and prepping meals ahead of time so you do not rely on convenience foods
    • having grab-and-go healthy snacks available if you have a busy schedule; examples include smoothies, portable fruit like apples, oranges, or bananas, or healthy non-perishable protein-rich foods such as nuts, seeds, and low-sodium turkey jerky
    • stopping “kitchen hours” at a certain time to prevent overeating at night and mindless snacking

    Finally, you can also add a heart-healthy supplement to your daily regimen such as Alestra. Alestra is a plant-based supplement containing Gugulipid, niacin, garlic bulb herb powder, cayenne, and phytosterol concentrate.  It works to support healthy cholesterol levels and support heart health. Visit the Vitasciences website for more information on Alestra, or one of their other heart-healthy supplement products.

    Be sure to visit the American Heart Association website at Heart.org for more information on the latest research and other helpful information on ways you can improve your heart health.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    Rapaport, Lisa (2017 Jan 31) “Skipping breakfast may be bad for your health, doctors say” Reuters, http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-cardiovascular-meal-timing-idUSKBN15F2GW

    St.-Onge, M-P, et al. (2017 Jan 30) “Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association.” Circulation, Volume 135: Issue 7.

     

     

     


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