Category Archives: osteoporosis

Could diabetes increase risk of osteoporosis?

osteoporosis, bone health, healthIf you have diabetes, you may or may not know that you are at higher risk for heart disease than those who don’t have diabetes. However, in addition to heart disease, you could also be at risk for bone health issues. This risk was discovered in a recent study that found those with diabetes were at higher risk for osteoporosis than those without diabetes. Therefore, this finding warrants further research on this risk. And in turn, standard diabetes diet and supplement treatments may need to be revised to account for this higher risk.

What is osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes bone loss. It often occurs without any symptoms. Therefore, you may not know you have the condition until you fall and break a bone. The bone loss related to osteoporosis can be caused by the body losing too much bone, not making enough bone, or both.

Literally, osteoporosis means “porous bone” which describes the honeycomb-like bone structure in those with the conditions. These spaces in the bone make it less dense, weaker, and more likely to break. It may be beneficial if you are 50 years of age or older, to get a bone density test.

Height loss or curving of the spine may be serious symptoms of osetoporosis. Therefore, if you have such symptoms and have not yet been diagnose with osteoporosis, you should visit your doctor right away. If diganosed, treatment will likely include vitamin D and calcium supplements, an exercise program, and medications.

You may be at risk for osteoporosis if you have:

  • certain autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis
  • certain cancers like breast or prostate cancer
  • digestive conditions like inflammatory bowel disease or celiac disease
  • a history of weight loss surgery
  • liver disease
  • and eating disorder
  • certain thyroid or hormone-related conditions

You may also be at risk for osteoporosis if you take certain medications such as:

  • certain heartburn medicines like  Nexium®, Prevacid® and Prilosec®
  • some antidepressants like Lexapro®, Prozac® and Zoloft®
  • steroids
  • certain diabetes medicines like thiazolidinediones

Osteoporosis and Diabetes

Using data from the 2013 Danish National Health Survey, researchers looked at the connection between bone health conditions and other health factors.  This analysis found that those people with diabetes were one-third more likely to have osteoarthritis than those without diabetes. These same people were also more likely to have bone related conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

Likely related to such bone conditions, those with diabetes were more nearly 30-percent more likely to have back, shoulder, and neck pain as well. Researchers suggest that the link between bone health and diabetes may be inflammation. Diabetes is an inflammatory condition as is arthritis. Therefore, those with one condition may have an increased risk of developing other inflammation-related conditions. This research warrants further research on this connection of inflammatory health conditions.

Ways to help your bone health

If you feel you may be more at risk for bone health conditions, read below for ways you can help improve your bone health.

  • Consume plenty of calcium: Calcium is used in many parts of the body such as helping blood clot and muscles to contract. And when the body does not have enough calcium to do these things, it takes the calcium from the bones. Over time, this can make the bones weak. Therefore, be sure to have plenty of calcium in your daily diet. Foods high in calcium include milk, yogurt, fortified breakfast cereals and juices, as well as leafy greens like kale and spinach.
  • Go outside every once in while: Vitamin D is also known as the sunshine vitamin since the body can absorb it from the sun. This vitamin helps the body absorb calcium, so it is very important to bone health. Therefore, be sure to get outside at least 10-15 minutes a day with some of your arms, legs, and face showing. During the winter, consume plenty of fatty fish like salmon, eggs, mushrooms, and fortified dairy products for vitamin D. Ask your doctor to have your vitamin D levels checked each year and take a daily supplement if your levels are low.
  • Stay active: Exercise is great for not only keeping blood glucose levels stable if you have diabetes, but it is also good for bone health.  Weight-bearing exercises like walking, hiking, jogging, dancing, and weight training are good for strengthening bones. Be sure to engage in some sort of physical activity most days of the week. You should engage in strength training such as weight exercises or resistance training at least 2 times a week.
  • Eat a plant-based diet: Not only does a plant-based diet contain calcium-rich leafy greens, but is also antioxidant-rich. Antioxidants can reduce the inflammation that can lead to oxidative stress and increased chronic disease risk. Therefore, eat plenty of colorful fruits and vegetables at every meal and snack.
  • Take a bone health supplement: If you are having trouble consuming enough calcium and vitamin D, a supplement may be for you. Find a supplement that combines calcium and vitamin D, or take them separate. One such supplement is Osteovent by Vita Sciences. Osteovent contains 400IU vitamin D3 and 1000mg calcium along with other important bone health nutrients like magnesium as well as antioxidants like vitamin C and bromelain.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

References:

National Osteoporosis Foundation (accessed October 10, 2018) “What is osteoporosis and what causes it?”

National Osteoporosis Foundation (accessed October 10, 2018) “Calcium/Vitamin D.”

NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center (February 2017) “Osteoporosis Overview.”


  • Could vitamin D protect against bone loss?

    Are you one of the 44 million Americans with low one density?  If so, and if you are over the age of 50, you could be one of the 10 million Americans with osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a dangerous condition in which your bones become fragile and at risk for fractures.  In older individuals, osteoporosis can lead to hip fractures that can limit mobility, or even spine fractures that could be debilitating.  Older women at are most risk for osteoporosis, but this condition can occur to both men and women at any age.

    osteoporosis, vitamin D, bone health

    Osteoporosis can weaken bone strength over time increasing risk of hip, wrist, and spinal fractures.

    If you want to prevent osteoporosis, there are a few controllable factors that you can take charge of to lower your risk.

    • Quit smoking or don’t start if you don’t smoke.
    • Limit drinking alcohol.
    • Eat a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D

    A recent study by researchers from Harvard-affiliated Hebrew Senior Life found that older adults who consumed calcium-rich foods such as yogurt, milk, or cheese had higher bone mineral density in the spine and less bone loss in the hip.  However, this risk was only reduced significantly along with consumption of vitamin D supplementation. It is suspected that this finding is due to vitamin D’s important function of assisting with calcium absorption.  Without vitamin D, our body cannot adequately absorb all of the calcium goodness from the foods that we eat. In turn, our bones cannot receive the strengthening elements of calcium needed to preserve bone and prevent bone loss.

    If you are not sure if you are vitamin D deficient, be sure to check with your healthcare provider.  Furthermore, if you are vitamin D deficient, it will be important to start on a vitamin D supplementation regimen.  However, check with your healthcare provider to find a regimen that will be best for you. Other ways to increase vitamin D include consuming foods rich in the vitamin such as:

    • fish oils
    • fatty fish
    • mushrooms
    • beef liver
    • cheese
    • egg yolks
    • fortified milk

    Also, by increasing your sunlight exposure you can naturally increase your daily intake of vitamin D.   However, the amount of sunlight exposure needed to provide the most benefit will differ for everyone.   This is because the time of day, where you live, and skin pigmentation can all affect the amount of vitamin D your skin makes.

    Furthermore, pair your healthy bone regimen with a supplement like Osteovent from Vita Sciences. Osteovent is power-packed with bone healthy vitamins such as vitamin D, calcium, magnesium, vitamin K, and boron that are recommended by the Open Orthopaedics Journal.

    Visit the National Osteoporosis Foundation website for all of the great work they are doing to help increase awareness of osteoporosis and improve bone health efforts.

    Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    National Institutes of Health (2017 March 1). “Older Bones Benefit from Dairy Plus Vitamin D” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163861.html

    National Institutes of Health Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center (2014 Nov). “What is Osteoporosis? Fast Facts: An Easy to Read Series of Publications for the Public” https://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/bone/osteoporosis/osteoporosis_ff.asp

    Calcium/Vitamin D