Category Archives: obesity

Diet and Exercise for Diabetes Prevention

healthy, diet, diabetes, healthIf you have been told you are at risk for diabetes, then I’m sure you’ve been told to diet and exercise. This advice is nothing new to help lower your risk. However, new research confirms a method of diet and exercise that can prevent those with prediabetes from developing diabetes. Read below for more on this research and learn how you can lower your risk of this chronic condition today.

What is prediabetes?

Prediabetes occurs when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to meet type 2 diabetes criteria. According to the Centers for Disease Control, about one in three American adults have diabetes. And surprisingly, about 90-percent don’t even know that they have it. That is why it’s so important for everyone to have their numbers checked every year.

These numbers include not only fasting blood glucose levels, but also cholesterol, trigycerides, blood pressure, and HgA1C. HgA1C tells you the average blood glucose levels in your body over the previous three months. Those with a HgA1C level below 5.7 are in the healthy range. However, those with a level between 5.7 and 6.4 are in the prediabetes range.  And if this level tests 6.5 or above two times in a row, then a person is given a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.

Prediabetes research

A recent study looked at the effect of diet and exercise on the changeover from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes. The study looked at 962 patients with prediabetes and followed them for about three years.

All patients were first placed on a 800-calorie diet with a meal replacement for two months. Then, patients were either placed on a high protein and low glycemic diet or a moderate protein and moderate glycemic diet. Patients were also asked to either engage in vigorous intensity exercise for 75 minutes a week or moderate intensity for 150 minutes a week.

Study results show that only 62 of the 962 patients enrolled in this study progressed from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes.  Both diet programs tested showed reduced risk of the condition. Therefore, researchers suggest that a period of meal replacement-induced weight loss followed by three years of weight maintenance is an effective strategy for preventing prediabetes progression to type 2 diabetes. So, just eat a balanced diet of lean proteins and plant-based foods and stay as active as possible to lower your risk.

Other ways you can lower your risk of diabetes

Besides diet and exercise, use the following tips to improve your health and lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Just small changes made each week can over time lower your risk in a big way.

  • Manage stress through therapy, exercise, support groups, relaxation breathing, meditation, or yoga. Research shows that those who experience more perceived stress are more likely to be at risk for getting type 2 diabetes.
  • Be sure to sleep at least seven hours each night if possible to help your body regulate blood glucose levels better. According to the Joslin Diabetes Center, those who do not sleep enough each night are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes. Not to mention that these people are also at higher risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke. So, be sure to reduce screen time before bed time and avoid eating less than two hours before bed time. These tips are just some ways you can improve bed time and avoid interrupted sleep.
  • Consume more fiber in your diet through whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. This will not only help you to improve gut health but can aid in weight management.
  • Take a daily supplement such as Glucarex by Vitasciences. Glucarex contains natural ingredients like chromium, vanadium, alpha lipoic acid, and cinnamon. This supplement formula supports healthy weight, metabolism, and blood glucose levels.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

References:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (last reviewed May 30, 2019) “Prediabetes: Your Chance to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes.”

Healio Primary Care (June 11, 2019) “Weight loss, behavior change prevents changeover from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (April 2018) “The A1C Test & Diabetes.”


  • How to help your headaches- Headache Awareness Month 2019

    brain, headache, health, migraineTraffic, rude neighbors or co-workers, and financial stress are some the of common things in life that can cause stress. In turn, this stress can give you a headache. Besides literally being a pain, chronic headaches can reduce quality of life and lead to other health issues over time. In honor of June, which is Headache Awareness Month, let’s learn more about headaches and how you can manage them naturally.

    All about headaches

    When it comes to headaches, not all of them are created equal. This is because some can be worse than others, they can affect different sides of the head, and some last longer than others. The two major types of headaches are tension headaches and migraines.

    First of all, the most common type of headache is the tension headache. Tension headaches may stem from mental stress, or tension, as well as too little sleep, too much alcohol, or a mental health condition like anxiety or depression. And according to experts, tension headaches usually occur as a result of tight muscles in the shoulder, neck, scalp, and jaw.

    The second major type of headache is the migraine. And unlike tension headaches, migraines involve a whole different level of pain. This is because migraines cause more than just a head ache. In fact, other symptoms of a migraine can include:

    • moderate to severe throbbing often on one side of the head
    • sensitivity to light and sound
    • nausea
    • vision changes such as flashing lights or temporary loss of vision

    Headache management 

    Typical treatment of a headache may involve an over the counter pain reliever. However, if you deal with headaches often, you may want to find more natural ways to deal with your condition to avoid taking so much medicine. Some natural ways of dealing with headaches include:

    Acupuncture: This age-old technique of inserting thin needles in certain areas of the skin has been shown to help reduce headaches if the active points are targeted. Therefore, it’s important to ensure that you visit an acupuncturist who has experience and training in treating headaches to ensure you receive the most effective treatment.

    Massage: Through manipulation of soft tissues of the body, research shows that massage can help relieve tension-type headaches.

    Spinal manipulation: Healthcare providers like chiropractors can provide spinal manipulation treatment. This type of treatment involves applying a controlled force to a joint in the spine. By doing this, research shows that this type of treatment may help reduce the pain and intensity of migraine headaches. However, it’s important to note that such manipulation may cause side effects. Such side effects may include temporary headaches, tiredness, or discomfort in the area that was worked on. Therefore, be sure to talk with your doctor before opting for this headache treatment.

    Breathing exercises: Although there have been limited studies done, one study does show that breathing exercises, such as those involved with yoga, can help lessen headache intensity and frequency. Therefore, it may do your body and mind good to add yoga to your weekly routine. Other breathing-related exercises that may help include meditation, relaxation breathing, or tai chi.

    Losing weight or diet changes: Experts suggest that you can manage headaches by losing weight or taking a magnesium supplement daily. Also, adding magnesium-rich foods to your diet could help with headache treatment. Such foods include spinach, quinoa, nuts like almonds, cashews, and peanuts, as well as black beans, avocado, and tofu, to name a few.

    Certain dietary supplements: According to the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society, the supplement butterbur is effective in reducing the severity and frequency of migraine attacks. It’s important to note though that the effects of long-term use of this supplement are not known. Also, it’s thought that extended use could harm the liver. Therefore, be sure to have other options in your headache treatment routine and ask your doctor before starting this supplement.

    Instead of this supplement then, it may be worth it to try a more natural and safe supplement such as Migravent by Vita Sciences. Migravent contains natural ingredients like specialized PA free butterbur, CoQ10, magnesium, and riboflavin for advanced neurological support. PA free butterbur means that you receive the migraine health benefits of butterbur without the pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) that are unhealthy for your liver.

    Take home message

    Headaches can literally be a pain in the neck. Therefore, it’s always good to have an array of remedies up your sleeve. This way you can deal with them effectively when you need to. For ways you can help support research on headache treatment as well as for resources and events to advocate for those who suffer from such health issues, be sure to visit the American Headache Society website today.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    American Headache Society (accessed June 4, 2019) “How to Participate in Migraine and Headache Awareness Month.”

    Goldman, R. (last updated July 26, 2017) “Ten foods high in magnesium.” Medical News Today.

    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (last modified May 16, 2019) “Headaches: In Depth.”

     

     


  • Could intermittent fasting help your diabetes control?

    intermittent fasting, fasting, health, weight loss, dietWhen it comes to diabetes control, you may know that carbohydrate intake must be controlled. Along with this, intake of certain concentrated sweets and sugary drinks should be limited. Also, a plant-based diet has been shown to help diabetes. Besides these traditional methods of controlling blood glucose through diet, meal timing, like intermittent fasting, may also help. Recent studies show that limiting meal times to a certain portion of the day may help improve weight and metabolic health.

    What is meal timing?

    Meal timing can describe a number of different ways of eating. For athletes it may mean timing meals before and after workout to ensure sufficient energy. However, for those with diabetes, it may mean planning out carbohydrate intake to control blood glucose levels. Also, meal timing could mean intermittent fasting, which limits the amount of time a person eats during each day.  Research over the past few years shows that intermittent fasting may help improve metabolic health parameters. This in turn could help improve blood glucose control in those with diabetes.

    What is intermittent fasting?

    There are several forms of intermittent fasting (IF), but the premise for all forms is similar. Basically, IF limits the amount of time each day that a person eats so that the body can heal during hours of fasting. The most common forms of IF include:

    • Fasting for 12 hours a day: Those starting out on IF can use this method to help your body adapt to fasting gradually.
    • The 16:8 method:  This method of IF involves fasting for 16 hours a day, and limiting eating to 8 hours daily.
    • The 5:2 method: This method of IF involves eating a healthy, balanced diet for 5 days. Then on the other two days, you consume only 500 to 600 calories on two, non-consecutive days of the week
    • Alternate day fasting: This method of IF involves fasting every other day. On fasting days, you can consume either no food or only about 500 calories. Although, you should consume plenty of low to no calorie fluids for hydration. This is an extreme form of IF, so be sure to ask your doctor before starting to make sure its safe for you.

    IF and blood glucose control

    Recent research shows that IF may help those with diabetes control their blood glucose. One study involved three case studies of patients with diabetes that followed IF.  Each patient fasted for 3 to 4 days a week for 7 to 11 months. Study results show that patients were able to lose significant amounts of weight and reduce their HgA1C levels. An HgA1C level is the average blood glucose level of a person over three months.

    Another study looked at the effect of a 1-week trial of IF on 15 men at risk of diabetes. These men only consumed food for nine hours during the day, and then fasted for 15 hours.  During their feeding times, they consumed their regular diets. Study results show that restricting eating time during the day can help improve blood glucose levels. In turn, this could help those at risk for type 2 diabetes to lower their risk of this chronic disease.

    Other ways to control blood glucose levels

    Besides changes in diet, there are other ways a person can control their blood glucose levels such as the following:

    • Exercise: Staying active most days of the week for at least 30 minutes can help you improve insulin sensitivity and control blood glucose. You don’t have to exercise all 30 minutes at once. Just a few minutes of exercise throughout the day adds up to better blood glucose and overall health.
    • Medication: Be sure to follow the medication regimen recommended by your doctor to help control your blood glucose levels. Also, visit your doctor often to keep track of your blood glucose levels and tweak your dosage if needed.
    • Manage stress: Since stress can increase your blood glucose level, it’s important to manage stress to control blood glucose levels. Working with a psychologist, learning to relaxation breathe, or taking yoga classes can help you manage stress.
    • Take a daily supplement: If your doctor is ok with it, then a daily supplement might help blood glucose control. A supplement such as Glucarex by VitaSciences contains ingredients like cinnamon and alpha lipoic acid can support weight loss as well as healthy metabolism and blood glucose levels.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD of LighttrackNutrition.com

    References:

    Cohut, M. (May 2, 2019) “To control blood sugar, set strict meal times.” Medical News Today.

    Furmli, S., Elmasry, R., Ramos, M. and Fung, J. (October 2018) “Therapeutic use of intermittent fasting for people with type 2 diabetes as an alternative to insulin.” BMJ Case Rep., 2018: bcr2017221854.

    Leonard, J. (last reviewed June 28, 2018 by Butler, RD, LD, N.) “Seven ways to do intermittent fasting.” Medical News Today.

    Mayo Clinic (May 6, 2017) “Diabetes management: How lifestyle, daily routine affect blood sugar.”


  • Could weight loss help lower risk of migraine?

    anxiety, stress, depression, health, mental health, headache, migraineWith summer on the horizon, weight loss efforts are in full bloom. However, weight loss can provide more than just body confidence. The Centers for Disease Control report that just losing 5-percent of your body weight, which is equal to about 10 pounds for a 200 lb. person, can lower your risk of chronic diseases like heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Not to mention that a recent study shows that losing weight can also lower risk of migraines.

    What is a migraine?

    A migraine is a recurring type of headache that causes a throbbing or pulsing pain along with other uncomfortable symptoms. Other symptoms of a migraine may include:

    • nausea
    • weakness
    • sensitivity to light and sound

    Migraines can be triggered by a variety of different things such as:

    • stress
    • anxiety
    • hormonal changes in women
    • loud noises
    • bright or flashing lights
    • lack of sleep
    • tobacco
    • skipped meals
    • certain medicines
    • caffeine
    • too much activity (overexertion)

    Women and those with a family history of migraines are at greater risk of developing migraines. Treatment usually includes certain pain relievers, resting with your eyes closed in a quiet, dark room, as well as placing an eye pack on your forehead and drinking plenty of fluids.

    Migraines and weight loss

    A recent study analyzed data from 10 different studies regarding migraine occurrence. Study results show that those who lost weight had a reduction in the days per month they had migraines. Also, pain severity and duration of the headache was reduced with weight loss. The results seemed to be the same in adults and kids. Also, results were similar for anyone who lost weight, no matter how the weight was lost (i.e. surgery, diet and exercise).

    It is thought that those who are overweight or obese may be more at risk for migraine headaches due to inflammation. Researchers suggest that certain proteins released by fat tissue, obesity-related health problems such as hypertension and type 2 diabetes, as well as psychological risk factors, stroke, and respiratory conditions may also increase risk of headaches in those who are overweight or obese.

    If you have migraines, but have not found success with any medications over-the-counter, then you may want to visit your doctor for suggestions. Another option is to try a natural supplement like Migravent by Vita Sciences. Migravent contains ingredients like CoQ10, magnesium, and riboflavin, among others to help promote migraine relief and provide neurological support.

    Tips on losing weight 

    There are many ways to approach weight loss. It will vary according to the individual. Your current health status will determine your nutrient needs and exercise tolerance. Also, your food allergies or intolerances and daily schedule will help determine the eating plan that will work best for you. The key is to start changing unhealthy habits one at a time. Over time, you will create the healthy lifestyle that helps you meet your health goals and that is easy for you to stick with for the long term.

    Here are some tips to help you start planning your weight loss program.

    • Write down short-term and long-term goals: Although the term goals may make some people sigh in frustration, they are important for keeping you on track with your weight loss regimen. Start by writing out your ultimate goal for the year, then break it down into smaller goals such as monthly goals. For example, your yearly goal may be to lose 50 pounds. Since this can seem overwhelming to approach, break this goal down into smaller monthly goals. These goals should be S.M.A.R.T., or specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. A goal of this kind will help you track your progress since it’s measurable. Therefore, instead of just saying “I want to eat more vegetables,” instead you could make one of your monthly goals “I will eat at least one cup of vegetables at each meal over the next four weeks.”
    • Make time for planning and prepping meals: Your busy schedule may have you pressed for time. However, in order to have the best chance of weight loss success, you need to make time for meal planning and prepping. Just an hour a week can give you plenty of time to write a shopping list and meal calendar. These tools can help you know what foods you need to stay on track with your diet. A registered dietitian may be helpful to get you started on such as meal plan. Once you have the foods you need in stock, then just take another hour or so a week to wash, chop, dice, and portion out fruit and vegetables for meals and snacks. This can provide convenient meal and snack options that can make it easier for you to stay on track throughout the week.
    • Be active whenever possible: Every step counts, so move whenever possible. Take the stairs when you can, or walk your dog or take a walk after meals. You can also take a walk at lunch at work or home to help get some steps in and aid digestion.
    • Visit your doctor regularly: You should visit your doctor at least once a year to check your numbers. These numbers include blood pressure, weight, and labs like cholesterol and blood glucose. However, if you have a chronic condition or are at risk for such conditions like heart disease or diabetes, then you should visit twice a year or more to keep track of your numbers and risk factors.
    • Be accountable: Besides going to the doctor, it’s important to stay accountable in other ways as well to stay on track with your weight loss. This means weekly weigh-ins, having a weight loss buddy, and/or having a health coach to support you and provide motivation along the way.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD of LighttrackNutrition.com

    References:

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (last reviewed February 13, 2018) “Losing Weight.” https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/losing_weight/index.html

    Mayo Clinic Medline Plus (Last updated on February 7, 2019) “Migraine.” https://medlineplus.gov/migraine.html

    MindTools (accessed March 27, 2019) “SMART Goals: How to Make Your Goals Achievable.” https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/smart-goals.htm

    Preidt, R. (March 25, 2019) “Fewer Excess Pounds May Mean Fewer Migraines.” https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2019-03-23/fewer-excess-pounds-may-mean-fewer-migraines

     


  • Could sugary drinks reduce life expectancy?

    soda, cola, sugar, sugary drinkAnyone who has been on a healthy lifestyle plan knows that you should try not to drink your calories. This is because you want to cut calories wherever you can to lose weight. However, cutting out those sugary drinks are not only helpful in weight loss, but also in cutting your disease risk. In fact, a recent study found that those who drank less sugary drinks had a lower risk of chronic diseases and early death as compared to those who drank sugary drinks often.

    What is considered a sugary drink?

    A sugary drink can be anything from processed colas to fresh squeezed juices. Here are some examples of sugary drinks you should limit in your daily routine.

    • cola
    • milkshakes
    • coffee drink blends
    • orange, apple, or other fruit juices
    • certain kinds of smoothies
    • flavored milks
    • sports drinks
    • sweetened waters
    • energy drinks

    These sugary drinks can be sweetened with plain sugar or one of many forms of sugar used in processed goods. Some examples of added sugars include:

    • brown sugar
    • corn sweetener
    • corn syrup
    • dextrose
    • fructose
    • glucose
    • high-fructose corn syrup
    • honey
    • lactose
    • malt syrup
    • maltose
    • molasses
    • raw sugar
    • sucrose

    Sugary drinks and health outcomes research

    Sugary drink intake has been linked to cognitive impairment, obesity in children and adults as well as dental caries.   Also, some research shows that sugar-sweetened beverage intake may be linked to heart health issues.

    One recent study looked at the impact of sugary-sweetened beverage intake on health. Study results show that those women who drank sugary drinks more than two servings a day had a 63-percent higher risk of early death than those who drank less than one serving a month. Also, by looking at the same factors in men, those who drank more sugary drinks had a 29-percent higher risk of premature death than those who drank less.

    Researchers suggest that this risk of premature death comes from chronic diseases linked with sugary drink intake. For example, those who drink more sugary drinks may have overall poorer diets. In turn, this may lead to a greater risk of obesity. Then this increase in body weight may increase risk of obesity-related diseases like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Therefore, it’s these chronic diseases that increase the risk of early death in those that drink a lot of sugary drinks.

    Other ways to reduce sugar in your diet

    Besides cutting down on sugary drinks, you can cut out sugar in your diet by following the tips below.

    • Have healthy snacks on hand: If you’re not prepared with healthy snacks in tow, then you are more likely to walk to the vending machine for a snack. However, most convenience snacks are full of added sugar and sodium. Therefore, grab some portable fruit like bananas, apples, or oranges before you leave the house for work. Fruit may also contain sugar, but it’s natural sugar. Not to mention, that fruit also contains fiber and antioxidants that help reduce inflammation in the body and keep your gut healthy.
    • Find alternatives to sugary drink options: Instead of energy drinks, reach for a cup of coffee with some almond milk. Or instead of a soda, try drinking a seltzer water infused with fruit like lemon or limes. Also, if you enjoy your coffee blended drink, just opt for sugar-free flavorings, skim or plant-based milk options, and skip the whipped cream and chocolate or caramel drizzle on top.
    • Take a sugar control supplement: If you’re in the midst of trying to cut down on sugar in your diet, but need a little help, then try a glucose control supplement. Glucarex by Vita Sciences is one example of a natural supplement that can help you control your blood glucose levels. This is because Glucarex contains ingredients like chromium, alpha lipoic acid, and cinnamon to help naturally support weight loss, metabolism, and healthy blood glucose levels. Therefore, such a supplement could support any healthy lifestyle habits you are trying to make to improve your health.
    • Know your numbers: By keeping track of your blood glucose, blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides you can detect health problems before they start. Just be sure to visit your doctor often to have your labs checked at least once a year. However, you may have to visit more often if you have a family history of or diagnosis of chronic disease(s) already.

    References:

    Anjum, I., Jaffery, S. S., Fayyaz, M., Wajid, A., & Ans, A. H. (2018). “Sugar Beverages and Dietary Sodas Impact on Brain Health: A Mini Literature Review.” Cureus10(6), e2756. doi:10.7759/cureus.2756

    Bleich, S. N., & Vercammen, K. A. (2018). “The negative impact of sugar-sweetened beverages on children’s health: an update of the literature.” BMC obesity5, 6. doi:10.1186/s40608-017-0178-9

    Bracho-Sanchez, E. (March 18, 2019) “Sugary drinks linked to higher risk of premature death, especially for women, study says.”  https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/18/health/sugary-drinks-premature-death-women-study/

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (last reviewed February 27, 2017) “Get the Facts: Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Consumption.”

    Deshpande, G., Mapanga, R. F., & Essop, M. F. (2017). “Frequent Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and the Onset of Cardiometabolic Diseases: Cause for Concern?” Journal of the Endocrine Society1(11), 1372-1385. doi:10.1210/js.2017-00262

    Luger, M., Lafontan, M., Bes-Rastrollo, M., Winzer, E., Yumuk, V., & Farpour-Lambert, N. (2017). “Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Weight Gain in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review from 2013 to 2015 and a Comparison with Previous Studies.” Obesity facts10(6), 674-693.

     


  • Could eating processed foods increase risk of death?

    processed, processed foods, ultraprocessed, unhealthy, canned, packaged, convenienceIf you read just about any healthy eating plan, you may see the phrase “eat less processed foods.” This can seem like a difficult task since many foods in the grocery store aisles seem to contain long lists of ingredients. Therefore, it can be hard to figure out what to eat for optimal health while still staying within your food budget. However, recent research shows that eating too many ultraprocessed foods can increase risk of death. Let’s learn a  bit about these foods and how you can clean up your diet.

    What are ultra processed foods?

    Ultra processed foods are those processed foods that are mass produced, packaged foods. They often contain ingredients such as flavoring agents, colors, emulsifiers, humectants, non-sugar sweeteners, and other cosmetic additives. These compounds are used to imitate natural flavors. Examples of ultra processed foods include:

    • packaged breads and buns
    • sweet or savory packaged snacks
    • prepackaged candies and desserts
    • sodas and sweetened drinks
    • pre-made meat products that are packaged such as meat balls, poultry, and fish nuggets
    • instant noodles and soups
    • frozen or shelf stable ready meals

    These foods are different from other processed food products like canned vegetables and preserved meat products that only contain added salt. This salt merely helps to preserve the food product. Other foods in this group include cheeses and freshly made un-packaged breads.

    On the other hand, minimally processed to unprocessed foods include fresh, dried, ground, chilled, frozen, pasteurized, or fermented staple foods. Such foods may include packaged fresh fruits, vegetables, rice, pasta, eggs, meat, fish, or milk products such as milk or yogurt.

    Ultra processed foods and health research

    Research is showing a lot of health risks from consuming too many ultra processed foods (UPF). One study shows that those who consumed more UPF had higher body mass index (BMI) and waist cicrcumference than those who didn’t eat such foods.  Another study shows that those who consumed more UPF had overall poor diet quality compared to those who ate less of these foods.

    A recent study also found that increased intake of UPF increased a person’s risk of death. This was a seven-year long study that looked at food intake data from over 40000 people. Study results show that intake of UPF was linked with a mean age of 45 to 64 years old, living alone, lower physical activity level, and higher body mass index, among other demographics.  Therefore, researchers will need to conduct more studies to figure out the mechanisms which these UPF directly affect health.

    How to clean up your diet

    It can be hard to eat less ultra processed foods and stay healthy. Or so you may think. Here are some tips on how to eat a healthier diet while not breaking the bank.

    • Buy in bulk. Although it may just be you or a few of you in your home, buying in bulk can save money. Choose family packs of meats to save money on these protein-rich food products. Separate the bulk pack into smaller servings in freezer bags and put in the freezer for later use. This way you can have a few meals from one bulk pack.
    • Buy manager’s special or discontinued items. Find out what day your grocery store puts out manager’s special items. This items in the meat, produce, and dairy sections will likely have brightly colored stickers on them with reduced prices to help sell items that may be a week away from being past their sell-by date. These foods are perfectly safe food items. However, you will just need to use them in your meals and snacks soon after purchasing.
    • Stock up on frozen vegetables. Frozen vegetables without added sauces, batters, or butter can be healthy and cheap ways to eat your veggies. Buy in bulk to save even more money. These vegetables are typically flash frozen, so they retain many nutrients from their fresh form and will produce less waste since they are good in the freezer for eight to ten months.
    • Do a  little prep work. Some low-cost healthy food items like fresh carrots, potatoes, celery, and salad greens may require some prep work. Rinsing, drying, and chopping such produce may be necessary to make them ready to eat. However, they are much cheaper than already washed and chopped veggies.
    • Eat out less. Eating out and ordering takeout may be convenient, but the cost can add up fast. Not to mention that such foods are high in sodium, unhealthy fats, and preservatives. Therefore, try to limit eating out to a treat once a week to help improve your health and save money.
    • Take a multivitamin to fill in the gaps. If you feel like your current diet is not meeting your nutrition needs, then a multivitamin may be in order. Although it’s best to consume your nutrients from food, a supplement can help if your healthy diet still has a few gaps. The multivitamin Zestia from Vita Sciences fills your nutrient gaps and then some. Zestia contains a comprehensive vitamin and mineral profile as well as a superfood complex and probiotics to enhance gut health.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    Fiolet, T., et al. (2018). “Consumption of ultra-processed foods and cancer risk: results from NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort.” BMJ (Clinical research ed.)360, k322.

    Schnabel L, Kesse-Guyot E, Allès B, et al. (2019) “Association Between Ultraprocessed Food Consumption and Risk of Mortality Among Middle-aged Adults in France. “JAMA Intern Med. Published online February 11, 2019.

    Silva, F.M., et al. “Consumption of ultra-processed food and obesity: cross sectional results from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) cohort (2008-2010).” Public Health Nutrition, 21(12): 2271-2279.

    Vandevijvere, S., De Ridder, K., Fiolet, T., Bel. S., and Tafforeau, J. (December 2018) “Consumption of ultra-processed food products and diet quality among children, adolescents and adults in Belgium.” European Journal of Nutrition, doi: 10.1007/s00394-018-1870-3. 


  • Drinking less alcohol could help weight loss goals this new year

    holiday, drinking, alcohol, cocktail, beer, wine, health, weightWhen you think of celebrating the holidays, sweet treats, comfort foods, and holiday-flavored spirits may come to mind. Although it’s definitely ok to indulge a little during the holidays, too much of anything can sabotage your healthy lifestyle efforts. And with the new year rolling around soon, you should think ahead and make a plan. Because once this holiday season is over, the new year will surely bring about new celebrations with more food and drink temptations.  And recent research shows that by drinking less alcohol, you could increase your chances for weight loss success.

    What is a standard drink?

    You may hear health experts urge you to keep your drinking to so many standard drinks a week. When this term is used, a standard drink is equal to:

    • 12 ounces beer (5% ABV)
    • 8 ounces malt liquor (7% ABV)
    • 5 ounces wine (12% ABV)
    • 1.5 ounces liquor (40% ABV)

    So, when you order that tall beer at the bar and grill, keep in mind that 22 ounces is nearly equal to two standard drinks. And experts recommend that women should consume no more than 7 standard drinks a week.  Also, men should consume no more than 14 standard drinks per week. Any more than this is considered heavy drinking.

    Also, if you consume more than 4 standard drinks for women or 5 standard drinks for men in a two hour occasion, then you are binge drinking. So, if you feel like this describes your holiday or social events, then it may be time to visit you health care provider or call for resources in your area that can help you control or stop your drinking.

    Alcohol health effects

    Drinking too much in one night or over time can have serious health effects. Not only does alcohol impair mobility and speech in the short-term, but can also impact brain, heart, and liver health. Even short term, drinking too much can impair your immune system for up to 24 hours after becoming drunk. This puts you at higher risk for catching illnesses than others during this time. Also, long-term alcohol intake can lead to increased risk for inflammation of the pancreas and heart disease. Both of these conditions can place you at higher risk for hospitalization and serious illness.

    Alcohol and weight loss

    When it comes to weight loss, alcohol can stall your best efforts. First of all, alcoholic beverages contain unnecessary calories. No matter how low in carbs certain concoctions may be, you are still drinking your calories when consuming alcohol. Not to mention that alcohol can lower your body’s ability to absorb nutrients from the food you eat and can slow your body’s fat burning abilities. The latter is because the liver is in charge of tasks like fat burning and removing toxins from the body. It considers alcohol a toxin.

    Therefore, when you drink, it has to stop fat-burning to focus on ridding of the alcohol toxins from your body. In turn, your body burns less fat while you drink. It takes about one hour for your body to break down one standard drink of alcohol.

    A recent study looked at alcohol and its impact on long-term weight loss in those with diabetes. Study results show that those who did not drink during the four year study lost more weight than those who drank any amount. Heavy drinkers had even worse long-term weight loss than others. Therefore, researchers suggest that patients with type 2 diabetes especially should not drink alcohol if they are trying to lose weight.  Needless to say, this study shows that anyone, regardless of health status, would benefit from drinking less alcohol.

    Other ways to be healthier in the new year

    Besides cutting down on drinking alcohol, there are also other ways you can be healthier this coming new year.

    • Sleep more: Most adults should sleep at least seven hours a night for optimal health.
    • Move more: Experts suggest that moving more each day, even in two minute spurts, for at least 150 minutes total each week, can benefit overall health.
    • Manage stress: Yoga, meditation, or just talking with a counselor can help you manage stress better and lower risk for emotional eating that can lead to weight management issues.
    • Eat more fruits and veggies: Antioxidant-rich fruits and veggies can provide inflammation-fighting compounds that can help lower your risk of diseases like heart disease and diabetes. Not to mention that the fiber from such foods is vital to gut health.
    • Take a supplement: If you don’t feel you are getting enough nutrients in your diet, then take a supplement like Zestia by Vita Sciences. Zestia not only contains whole food vitamin and mineral sources, but also digestive enzymes and probiotics for digestive health.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    1. Bertoia, M. L., et al. (2015). “Changes in Intake of Fruits and Vegetables and Weight Change in United States Men and Women Followed for Up to 24 Years: Analysis from Three Prospective Cohort Studies.” PLoS medicine12(9), e1001878. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001878
    2. Centers for Disease Control (last reviewed March 29, 2018) “Alcohol and Public Health: Frequently Asked Questions.” https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/faqs.htm#heavyDrinking
    3. National Health Service (last reviewed July 26, 2018) “How long does alcohol stay in your blood?” https://www.nhs.uk/common-health-questions/lifestyle/how-long-does-alcohol-stay-in-your-blood/
    4. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (accessed December 18, 2018) “Alcohol’s Effects on the Body.” https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/alcohols-effects-body
    5. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (accessed December 18, 2018) “What Is a Standard Drink?” https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/what-standard-drink
    6. ScienceDaily (December 3, 2018) “Alcohol intake may be key to long-term weight loss for people with Diabetes.” https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181203115449.htm
    7. Sinha, R., & Jastreboff, A. M. (2013). “Stress as a common risk factor for obesity and addiction.” Biological psychiatry73(9), 827-35.
    8. Traversy, G., & Chaput, J. P. (2015). “Alcohol Consumption and Obesity: An Update.” Current obesity reports4(1), 122-30.
    9. Watson, N. F., Badr, M. S., Belenky, G., Bliwise, D. L., Buxton, O. M., Buysse, D., Dinges, D. F., Gangwisch, J., Grandner, M. A., Kushida, C., Malhotra, R. K., Martin, J. L., Patel, S. R., Quan, S. F., … Tasali, E. (2015). “Recommended Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Adult: A Joint Consensus Statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society.” Sleep38(6), 843-4. doi:10.5665/sleep.4716

     


  • Do you have good metabolism? If not, try this

    metabolism, health, weightNow if you’ve ever tried to lose weight, which many of us have, then I’m sure you’ve heard the term metabolism. Usually you are told you either have “good” or “bad” metabolism. The only thing you may be sure of is that if you have a “bad” one then it will be harder for you to lose weight. But have you ever wondered what exactly this term means? If so, read below for some background on metabolism and a surprising look into how many of us have metabolic issues and what to do about it.

    What is metabolism?

    Metabolism is simply the way your body breaks down foods and uses them for energy. As you grow older, your metabolic rate naturally slows down. Not only that, but natural aging also leads to reduced levels of lean muscle mass. In turn, this will cause a further drop in your metabolic rate.

    Metabolic health and inflammation

    Besides aging, research is starting to see a possible connection between inflammation and metabolic health.  Evidence shows that regulators of the immune system and metabolic interactions include genetics and gut health. Inflammation and metabolic signals may also be closely related. Therefore, further research is warranted to see if an anti-inflammatory approach may be effective in treatment of insulin resistance and other metabolic-related health issues.

    What is good metabolic health?

    Having a “good” metabolic health means that you have healthy levels of the following five measures without the help of medication.

    • Fasting blood glucose: should be at or below 100 mg/dL
    • Triglycerides: should be at or below 150 mg/dL
    • High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, or “good” cholesterol: should be at or above 40 mg/dL for men or 50 mg/dL and above for women
    • Blood pressure: should be at or under 120 mm Hg systolic pressure over 80 mm Hg diastolic pressure
    • Waist circumference: should be less than 35 inches for women and less than 40 inches for men

    Any of these measures above the healthy ranges would indicate a less than optimal metabolic health. This in turn could put your at risk for conditions such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

    The metabolic state of the union

    A recent report looks at the latest results of the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The report looked at data from between 2009 and 2016 of about 8700 adults. This study is used often to look at data trends that represent the average U.S. population.

    Current data results reveal that only about 12-percent of the U.S. population has “good” metabolic health. Factors linked with “good” metabolic health include being physically active, younger, and a non-smoker, among other things. Obesity was a leading factor of “poor” metabolic health, with less than 1-percent of those who are obese being considered of “good” metabolic health.

    How can I improve my metabolic health?

    By looking at what increases risk of metabolic health issues, then you can see what lifestyle changes can help. Here is a list of some healthy lifestyle behavior changes you can make to help improve your metabolic health.

    • Exercise often: Stay active as much as possible with both cardio and strength training. This will help you to maintain muscle mass and heart health.
    • Eat a healthy, balanced diet: Try to consume a heart healthy diet full of antioxidant and fiber-rich fruits and vegetables as well as lean proteins and plenty of water. Be sure to portion out food into appropriate servings throughout the day to prevent eating too many calories daily. Also, limit processed food intake such as packaged snacks, meals, and sugary drinks and snacks. This will also help to lower your total calorie and sugar intake that can impact metabolic health.
    • Manage your weight: Diet and exercise, along with sleeping at least seven hours a night and managing stress can help manage your weight. Since obesity is a risk factor for poor metabolic health, managing weight can improve your metabolic health.
    • Quit smoking or don’t start: Since being a non-smoker is a marker for “good” metabolic health, then quitting smoking if yo smoke would help improve your metabolic health.
    • Take supplements when necessary: If you have any nutrient deficiencies, then this could impact your energy or ability to be at your best. Therefore, in some cases, a supplement such as Glucarex by Vita Sciences may be helpful. Glucarex contains natural ingredients like chromium, alpha lipoic acid, and cinnamon to help naturally support weight loss as well as healthy metabolism and blood glucose levels.
    • Visit your healthcare provider often: If you visit your doctor at least once a year to check your lab numbers, then you can better track your progress. This can help yo to catch any unhealthy trends in lab values early before they cause any major health issues.

    References:

    1. NIH News in Health (July 2015) “Minding Your Metabolism.”
    2. Medline Plus (April 23, 2018) “Can you boost your metabolism?” https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000893.htm
    3. HealthDay (December 4, 2018) “Few Americans Have Optimal ‘Metabolic Health.'”
    4. Zmora, N., Bashiardes, S., Levy, M., and Elinav, E. (March 2017) “The Role of the Immune System in Metabolic Health and Disease.” Cell Metabolism, 25(3): 506-521.
    5. Johns Hopkins Medicine (accessed December 12, 2018) “Metabolic Syndrome.”

     

     


  • Nuts can be your heart’s best friend

     

    From peanuts to pistachios, or almonds to macadamias, nuts can be a delicious, healthy snack any time of day. Nuts provide a plant-based food full of fiber, protein, and antioxidants that can add flavor and health to any dish. Not only that, but research shows that adding nuts to your daily routine can improve heart health and weight management, to name a few health benefits. Let’s learn a little more about nuts and how you can make them a staple in your healthy lifestyle routine.

    About nuts and heart health

    Nuts are a plant-based food that for many years was avoided by many due to its high calorie content. However, research now shows that this calorie dense food is also nutrient dense and could benefit heart health. This is due to the healthy mixture of unsaturated and omega-3 fats as well as protein and fiber.

    The highest protein nuts are almonds, and pistachios at about 6 grams per ounce. Cashews are not far behind at five grams of protein per ounce. When it comes to fiber, almonds, pistachios, pecans, and hazelnuts top the list of tree nuts at 3 grams of fiber per ounce. Furthermore, pecans and walnuts provide the most omega-3 fatty acids of the tree nuts at 278 and 2565 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids, respectively.

    Nuts and metabolic health

    Two recent studies looked at the health benefits of adding nuts to your daily routine. The first study looked at the impact of nut intake on weight gain. Study results show that by replacing a serving of unhealthy food with an ounce of nuts, a person could lower risk of weight gain and obesity. Such unhealthy foods that could be replaced include red meat, processed meat, French fries, desserts, or potato chips. Research suggests that by doing this you could help counteract the gradual weight gain many adults have with aging. This in turn could help reduce risk of obesity-related conditions like heart disease and diabetes.

    A second study looked at the impact of Brazil nut intake on overall health in healthy people. People in the study groups were given either a serving of Brazil nuts or pretzels with similar calorie and sodium content. Study results show that those given the Brazil nuts had an increased feeling of fullness. Also, nut intake prevented an increase in blood glucose and insulin levels after eating. These increases occurred with those eating pretzels about forty minutes after eating. Researchers suggest that this positive metabolic impact of Brazil nuts is likely due to its rich selenium content.

    Other ways to improve metabolic health

    Besides eating nuts, there are other ways you can help improve your health that include:

    • Sleeping enough at night. Most adults require at least seven to nine hours of sleep each night for your best health. Experts suggest that if you don’t receive enough sleep, your risk for type 2 diabetes can increase. Therefore, if you have trouble sleeping, be sure to visit your healthcare provider for tips. They can also see if you may have pain or sleep apnea that is preventing you from sleeping well.
    • Moving more. Staying active can help you reduce your risk of heart disease or diabetes. It does this by helping you to manage weight and improve insulin resistance. Therefore, try to engage in moderate activity for a total of 30 minutes a day most days. Such activities inlcude walking, biking, swimming, gardening, or other aerobic activity.
    • Managing stress. Stress can sap your energy levels and can also increase blood glucose levels and blood pressure. Therefore, find ways to manage your stress like relaxation breathing, yoga, or talking to a counselor. Also, taking a walk outside can  help refresh your mind so you manage stress better. Make time in your schedule for “me-time” that can help you improve your health.
    • Taking supplements when needed.  If you are B12-, iron-, or vitamin D-deficient, you can feel fatigued. This can make you not feel like being active and healthy. Therefore, be sure to have your nutrient levels checked each year. If you are low, you can take a supplement if needed to put your health on track. An example of such a supplement is Glucarex by Vita Sciences. Glucarex contains compounds like alpha-lipoic acid, cinnamon, and chromium. Along with antioxidant vitamins C and E, this supplement can help support healthy weight loss, metabolism, and blood glucose levels.

     References:

    Harvard Health Publishing: Harvard Medical School (June 2017) “Why nutritionists are crazy about nuts.” https://www.health.harvard.edu/nutrition/why-nutritionists-are-crazy-about-nuts

    Mayo Clinic (September 9, 2016) “Diabetes prevention: 5 tips for taking control.” https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-prevention/art-20047639

    National Sleep Foundation (accessed November 13, 2018) “The link between a lack of sleep and type 2 diabetes.” https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems-list/the-link-between-lack-sleep-and-type-2-diabetes

    Sandoiu, A. (November 5, 2018) “Daily serving of nuts may stave off weight gain.” Medical News Today, https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323577.php

    Today’s Dietitian (accessed November 13, 2018) “Nutritional Profiles of Tree Nuts.” https://www.todaysdietitian.com/pdf/webinars/treenuts/NutritionalProfilesofTreeNuts.pdf

     

     


  • Lower stroke risk with healthy living

    heart, health, stroke, cardiovascular, nutritionIt may seem like common sense that living a healthier lifestyle can lower your disease risk. but what exactly is a healthier lifestyle? With so much information on health and wellness in the media, it can be hard to know what healthy really is. From low carb to keto to fasting, each diet plan claims to be the best and healthiest. However, the healthiest eating regimen is going to be the one that makes your unique body feel its best and that you can stick with for the long term. Not to mention, that being healthy is about more than just diet. Staying active, managing stress, and sleeping well enough are just some behaviors that affect health. Recent research shows that leading a healthier lifestyle can reduce your stroke risk and in turn improve your quality of life.

    What is stroke?

    A stroke occurs when something blocks blood flow to the brain, or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts. As a result, part of the brain can become damage or die. This can lead to brain damage, disability, or death. Therefore, it is important to know if you are at risk for stroke. And if you are, it is important to know what you can do to lower your risk. This is because the brain is vital for such functions as thinking, feeling, breathing, and digestion. So to take care of your whole body health, you need to take care of your brain. And for brain health, you need to take care of your body in many ways. This is where healthy living comes in.

    Stroke risk and healthy living

    A 7-year research study looked at the impact of different lifestyle measures on stroke risk. Also, researchers looked at 90 gene variants in this group of over 300,000 people to determine their stroke risk. The stroke rate was 35-percent higher for those with a higher gene score versus one with a lower score. And when researchers looked at lifestyle factors, those who were healthier had a 66-percent lower risk of stroke than those who had an unhealthy lifestyle. In this study, those considered to have a healthy lifestyle were those that:

    • did not smoke.
    • were not overweight.
    • engaged in regular exercise.
    • consumed a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and fish.

    Furthermore, those who had a high genetic score and were considered unhealthy had a stroke risk score nearly double than that of those with the lowest scores and healthiest lifestyles.

    Ways you can live your healthiest life

    Besides eating right, staying active, and not smoking, there are several other things you can do to stay your healthiest.

    • Sleep enough each night: Research shows that short or too long sleep patterns as well as insomnia with short sleep patterns, can increase risk of stroke. Therefore, be sure to find a happy balance in your sleep time. the National Sleep Foundation recommends that most adults sleep seven to nine hours each night. If you find you are having trouble sleeping, it may be helpful to visit your doctor for treatment. They could recommend a sleep study done to identify any health issues that could be disturbing your sleep.
    • Manage stress: Stress affects all of us to some degree. However, too much stress can have an impact on your heart health. Therefore, be sure to manage your stress with some relaxation breathing, meditation, yoga, or talking to a counselor each week.
    • Visit your doctor regularly: It’s important to visit your doctor at least once a year to check your numbers. Your numbers include cholesterol, triglycerides, blood glucose levels, blood pressure, and body weight. These numbers can help identify any heart health risk factors you may have. The earlier you find such risk factors, the earlier you can receive treatment and prevent your risk of stroke.
    • Take supplements when necessary: If you are lacking certain vitamins or minerals in your diet, you may need a supplement such as a multivitamin or fish oil. This can help your body receive the antioxidants you need to fight oxidative stress and lower chronic disease risk factors. One such supplement is Circova by Vita Sciences. Circova contains ingredients like L-arginine, niacin, and hawthorne to help promote improved blood flow and blood pressure.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (May 3, 2018) “About Stroke.”

    HealthDay (October 25, 2018) “Does Stroke Run in Your Family? Healthy Living Lowers the Risk.”

    Koo, D. L., Nam, H., Thomas, R. J., & Yun, C. H. (2018). Sleep Disturbances as a Risk Factor for Stroke. Journal of stroke20(1), 12-32.

    Meschia, J.F., et al. (2014) “Guidelines for the Primary Prevention of Stroke.” Stroke, 45(12): 3754-3832.

    National Sleep Foundation (accessed October 30, 2018) “National Sleep Foundation Recommends New Sleep Times.”