Category Archives: Neuropathy

Could Hypertension Increase Dementia Risk in Women?

Ifhypertension, blood pressure, brain, memory, dementia you have high blood pressure, heart disease may be the health concern most on your mind. However, high blood pressure can be a risk factor for more than just heart conditions.  A recent study has found that women in their 40’s with high blood pressure have an increased risk of dementia.

What is high blood pressure?

A systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher and a diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher defines a diagnosis of high blood pressure, or hypertension.  Systolic blood pressure is a measure of the pressure when the heart contracts, while diastolic blood pressure is a measure of the pressure in between heart beats.

Hypertension occurs when there is some sort of damage or blockage that causes a narrowing of the blood vessels.  This narrowing slows the flow of blood and oxygen to tissues and organs in the body. Over time, this delayed oxygen and blood flow can cause damage to cells in the body that can lead to disease. Therefore, high blood pressure can lead to increased risk of diabetes, kidney damage, stroke, and vision loss.

Hypertension and Dementia

A recent study in the journal Neurology looked at the medical records of about 5600 patients over 15 years to see who developed dementia.  Those women in their 40’s with hypertension had up to a 73-percent risk of developing dementia.  Although, the same was not true of women in their 30’s or of men in their 40’s.  However, further studies must be done to determine the reason for these results.

Previous studies have found a link between high blood pressure and dementia, but it was not clear if hypertension before the age of 50 was a risk factor for the condition. However, it is clear that the brain is a metabolically active organ that requires oxygen to function properly. Without oxygen, brain cells starve and become damaged causing disease and dysfunction.  In order to get enough oxygen, blood flow to the brain must be healthy. Therefore, anything that prevents or delays blood flow, such as hypertension, could lead to cell damage in the brain as is seen in dementia.

Hypertension Prevention

To lower your risk of diseases such as dementia, take the following steps to prevent or control hypertension.

  • Eat a well-balanced diet of lean proteins, fiber-rich fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats such as nuts, seeds, avocado, and plant-based oils.  Be sure to limit your intake of sugary and salty processed foods which can increase hypertension risk.
  • Stay active most days of the week.  Walking, jogging, biking, dancing, and swimming are some ways you can stay active to keep your heart healthy. Try to be active for 30 minutes a day for most days of the week to help manage your weight and blood pressure.
  • Limit alcohol intake to no more than one drink a day for women and no more than 2 drinks a day for men.  Over this limit, alcohol can raise blood pressure and can also make it difficult to manage a healthy weight.
  • Control weight since those who are overweight or obese have a higher risk for hypertension than those of a healthy weight.
  • Don’t smoke since smoking can deprive your body of oxygen since it constricts blood vessels. In turn, smoking can increase risk of hypertension and related health issues.
  • Take all prescribed medications to help manage hypertension so that damage to the body’s cells can be limited.
  • Add in heart-healthy vitamins and supplements to your routine such as Presura by Vita Sciences. Presura contains a combination of hawthorn berry, niacin, and garlic extract to help support healthy blood pressure levels. Be sure to contact your healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen. It is important to make sure that any new supplements will not interact with your current prescribed medicines.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

American Heart Association (October 2016) “Changes You Can Make to Manage Blood Pressure”

American Heart Association (October 2016) “Understanding Blood Pressure Readings”

Medline Plus (October 4, 2017) “High Blood Pressure in 40’s a Dementia Risk for Women?”

National Institute on Aging (March 1, 2015) “High Blood Pressure” 

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Could hypertension affect your brain health?

Do you check your blood pressure often? Do you know what your blood pressure numbers vegetables, nutrition, hypertension, high blood pressure, heart healthare?  If you are a young adult, it is very likely that these questions have not been at the forefront of your mind when it comes to your health. A recent study showed that in 2013-2014, only half of the 6.7 million young adults from 18 to 39 years old were treated for high blood pressure. Meanwhile, only 40-percent got their blood pressure under control.  However, blood pressure control is not only important for heart health, but for brain health as well. Recent studies have linked normal blood pressure levels with improved cognition in older adults.

What  is blood pressure and what is considered a healthy level?

The American Heart Association defines high blood pressure, or hypertension, as 140/90.  The top number is the systolic pressure, or pressure at contraction. Furthermore, the bottom number is the diastolic pressure, or pressure in between beats. A normal blood pressure level is 120/80.

Risks of hypertension

You may think that hypertension is only related to heart health. However, a high blood pressure can increase risk of stroke, which affects the vessels in the brain. In addition, those with diabetes may have a higher risk of heart attack or stroke. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the blood vessels as well as the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. Therefore, those with diabetes should be extra careful to keep track of their blood pressure numbers to make sure they are in a healthy zone.

In addition to heart-related conditions, hypertension can affect brain health. A recent study has found that older adults whose systolic blood pressure was above 150 mmHg had higher levels of mental decline than those below 120 mmHg.  This study looked at 1700 adults from 70-79 years old over a 10-year period. These individuals in the study were being treated for hypertension, but initially had no mental decline. Those highest numbers in mental decline were seen in African-American older adults. Such declines were linked to health conditions such as kidney disease, stroke, and heart health.

How to improve heart health

Besides medications, there are many ways you can work towards improving your heart health.

  • Limit processed food intake such as packaged and canned foods. Crackers, chips, canned soups, sauces, gravies, deli meats, sausages, and hot dogs, as well as frozen meals are all high in sodium. Stick to fresh foods whenever possible. Also, frozen fruits and veggies without added sauces and sugars are good choices for a heart-healthy diet.
  • Stay active often by engaging in moderate activity most days. Walking, biking, dancing, gardening, or swimming are some moderate activities to try. An activity is moderate if you can hold a conversation, but cannot sing while performing it. Stay active for at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for great heart health benefits.
  • Eat a fiber-rich diet full of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains like oats, quinoa, brown rice, wild rice, and whole grain breads.  Consume at least 2 cups of vegetables a day at meal times. Also, add in some low-glycemic fruits such as apples, oranges, and berries for snacks.
  • Stop smoking if you smoke, and don’t start if you don’t. Smoking constricts the blood vessels, which makes it hard for oxygen to flow to your body’s tissues and organs.  Quitting smoking is not easy, so visit Smokefree.gov on resources to help you quit.
  • Keep track of your heart health numbers. Your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and blood glucose are all important numbers to check each year.  Check more often if you have a family history of diabetes or heart disease. Also, check your numbers at least every 6 months if you have a diagnosis of prediabetes, diabetes, or heart disease.
  • Add a heart healthy supplement to your regimen such as Presura by Vita SciencesPresura contains heart-healthy compounds such as Hawthorn Berry, Niacin, and Garlic extract. These compounds have been found to support healthy blood pressure levels.  Be sure to check with your doctor before starting any new supplement regimen.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

Medline Plus (August 21, 2017) “Lower Blood Pressure Best for Seniors’ Minds” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167931.html

Medline Plus (August 28, 2017) “Young Adults may be ignoring high blood pressure” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_168063.html

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (February 2017) “Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke” https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/preventing-problems/heart-disease-stroke

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Could You Be at Risk for Diabetes?

Could you be one of the nearly 30-percent of people with diabetes that are not diagnosed? Symptoms may not always be present if you are at risk for diabetes.  A diabetes, prediabetes, blood glucoserecent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that over 100 million people in the United States have diabetes or prediabetes.

Know Your Number

Your hemoglobin A1C level, or HgA1C, measures your diabetes risk. You may have never heard about it if it has been in normal range so far.  However, this number is one that can slowly creep up over time, so it is important to track.

So what does this test mean? Your HgA1C is your average blood glucose level from over the past three months.  A healthy HgA1C level is 5.6% or less, whereas 5.7% to 6.4% means that you have prediabetes.  If you have a HgA1C over 6.5%, you may have diabetes.

Recent Stats

A recent report states that nearly one in four people do not know they have diabetes. Just as alarming, over 80-percent of people who have prediabetes do not know that they have it. Untreated prediabetes can lead to diabetes within five years. Also, diabetes can lead to later problems with heart health, vision, and nerve function. Therefore, you should take steps to try and prevent this disease.

Small Steps for Health

Losing just 7-percent of your body weight can help lower your risk of diabetes by nearly two-thirds. Other ways to lower your risk include:

  • Staying active at least 30 minutes a day for most days of the week. This does not mean you have to go to boot camp or run. Walking, gardening, swimming, and climbing stairs can be great ways to stay active.
  • Eating a healthy, balanced diet. A balance of lean protein and fiber-rich fruits and vegetables is important for overall health.  On the same note, you should eat mostly whole, fresh foods. Also, you should limit intake of high-sodium, high-sugar processed foods.
  • Visiting your doctor often to make sure your health is on track.  You should visit your doctor at least once a year no matter what your health status.  If you have a condition such as diabetes or heart disease, you should visit the doctor more often.
  • Keeping track of your numbers such as blood glucose, HgA1C, and blood pressure can help prevent or treat chronic disease. These numbers can be checked when you visit your doctor.
  • Taking supplements such as Glucarex by Vita Sciences. Glucarex contains vanadium and cinnamon.  Research shows that these compounds can support healthy blood glucose levels.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

American Diabetes Association (November 21, 2016) “Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes” http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diagnosis/?loc=db-slabnav

CDiabetes (September 5, 2016) “Strategies for Balancing Blood Sugar Levels” http://cdiabetes.com/strategies-for-balancing-blood-sugar-levels/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (May 15, 2015) “2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report” https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/data/statistics/2014statisticsreport.html

Medline Plus (July 18, 2017) “More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes or Prediabetes: CDC” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167270.html

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Should yearly vision exams be in your diabetes routine?

Carbohydrate counting, staying active, and checking your blood glucose levels may remind you of the typical diabetes care routine. However, other aspects of diabetes care must not be forgotten. Foot care, dental care, and high cholesterol are just a few other check-ups that are important to diabetes care.

Those with diabetes are at high risk for foot ulcers due to decreased blood flow to the feet caused by diabetes-related nerve damage. Also, those with diabetes are at greater risk vision, eye exam, eye healththan those without diabetes for gum infections. Furthermore, those with diabetes have been shown to have greater blood vessel damage when they have high cholesterol than those without diabetes.

Diabetes and Eye Health

Another important part of diabetes care is regular vision check-ups. This is because those with diabetes are at higher risk for conditions such as glaucoma, cataracts, and retinopathy than those without diabetes.  Diabetes-related nerve damage that occurs as a result of uncontrolled blood glucose levels can greatly impact vision health. According to the National Eye Institute, all forms of diabetic eye disease can lead to severe vision loss and blindness.  However, it is diabetic retinopathy that is the most common cause of vision loss among those with diabetes.

What is Diabetic Retinopathy?

The retina is a light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye. The retina detects light and sends a signals through the optic nerve to the brain. Next, the brain converts this electrical signal to an image.  Uncontrolled diabetes damages vessels of the optic nerve, therefore worsening vision.

When someone has diabetic retinopathy, vessels in the retina swell and leak fluid into the retina. In turn, this fluid distorts vision.  Furthermore, in advanced stages of the disease, scarring of the retina can occur, which can eventually pull the retina away from the underlying tissue, which in turn could lead to blindness.

Diabetes and eye exams

A 2017 study in the New England Journal of Medicine observed the vision health of 1400 people with Type 1 diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes, over 30 years.  Biannual retinal photographs and general diabetes health reviews were used to assess vision health. From this study, it was determined that in place of yearly vision exams those with a Hemoglobin A1C, or average blood glucose level over three months of:

  • six-percent or less, without signs of diabetic retinopathy, would be safe getting a vision exam once every four years
  • six-percent or less with mild retinopathy should have vision exams ar least once every three years
  • eight to ten-percent should be screened more often than yearly for their vision health

In addition to getting regular exams, everyone, no matter their diabetes status should take steps to maintain vision health.  Consuming  vitamin A-rich foods such as brightly-colored veggies like carrots, peppers, and leafy greens is one way to support retinal health. Furthermore, leafy greens, as well as pistachios, contain the eye-healthy antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin that can lower your risk of eye disease. Finally, taking supplements with these eye-healthy nutrients can help you maintain your vision health.

Vita SciencesOcutain contains both lutein as well as beta-carotene, which support eye health. Also, be sure to visit Vita Sciences for other supplements such as Glucarex, which can support healthy blood glucose levels.

Also, be sure to visit the American Optometric Association website for further research and information on ways you can maintain vision health.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

American Optometric Association (accessed April 21, 2017) “Lutein & Zeaxanthin.” https://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/caring-for-your-vision/diet-and-nutrition/lutein?sso=y

Dreher, M.L. (April 2012) “Pistachio nuts: composition and potential health benefits.” Nutrition Reviews, 70(4):234-40.

Mayo Clinic (December 18, 2014) “Diabetes care: 10 ways to avoid diabetes complications” http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-management/art-20045803

Medline Health News (April 19, 2017) “Is Annual Eye Exam a Must for People With Type 1 Diabetes?” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164719.html

National Eye Institute (September 2015) “Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease” https://nei.nih.gov/health/diabetic/retinopathy

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Can Exercise Prevent Stroke Complications?

stroke, heart disease, health

Knowing these signs and symptoms of stroke can help save a life; perhaps even your own.

I’m sure you have heard many times before how exercising is great for keeping your heart strong. Therefore, it may come as no surprise that exercise has been found to prevent complications after someone has a stroke.

 

What is a stroke?

A stroke is essentially a brain attack of which there are two major types.

A hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a weakened blood vessel bursts.  An ischemic stroke is caused by restricted blood flow to the brain as a result of a vessel being blocked.

According to the National Stroke Association, these brain attacks are the fifth leading cause of death in America and one of the leading causes of adult disabilities in the country.  Unlike what was previously though, it is estimated that 80-percent of strokes can be prevented by such controllable lifestyle factors as:

  • Eating a healthy diet. To consume a heart and brain healthy diet, you can:
    • Limit saturated fats in the diet such as those from fatty meats, whole fat dairy products, and fried foods.
    • Limit sodium in the diet to 2300 milligrams a day.  You can limit sodium by reducing the amount of processed food products you consume each day.  Try to  limit intake of high sodium foods such as canned soups, chips, deli meats, and adding salt to your food.
    • Limit added sugars at meal and snack time.  Try to stick to foods that contain less than 15 grams of sugar per serving and limit intake of sugary drinks such as juice, cola, milkshakes, and dessert coffee drinks.
  • Stay active. Exercise at least 30 minutes a day for 5 days a week. This doesn’t mean you have to attend boot camp classes. Just walking at a brisk pace is enough to keep your heart strong.
  • Limit alcohol intake. For healthy living, you should consume no more than 1 standard drink a day for women and no more than 2 standard drinks a day for men. Alcohol has been associated with increased blood pressure, which can increase risk of stroke. One standard drink is equal to 12 ounces beer, 5 ounces wine, or 1.5 ounces liquor.
  • Quit smoking or don’t start. Smoking constricts the blood vessels, therefore restricting blood flow to the organs and tissues.
  • Visit your doctor regularly. You and your healthcare provider should work to control any chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes since these conditions can increase your risk of having a stroke.

Exercise and stroke

In the journal Neurology, researchers followed individuals with no history of stroke for 12 years.  Over 7-percent of those individuals suffered a stroke and survived during the course of the study.  It was found that three years after this major health event, survivors who had exercised regularly before their stroke were 18 percent more likely to be able to perform basic tasks such as bathing themselves. Furthermore, those individuals who were more fit were 16 percent more likely to be able to perform more complex tasks, such as managing money on their own, compared to those who did not exercise.

Surprisingly, a person’s body mass index, or estimate of fat mass, was not a predicting factor in their level of disability after having a stroke. Therefore, it is suggested that doctors should stress the importance of leading an active lifestyle for not only prevention of the condition, but also to improve chances of survival if a stroke occurs.

Another way to help prevent stroke is to take a heart healthy supplement such as Circova by Vita SciencesCircova contains a powerful blend of Hawthorne extract which has been found to assist in the dilation of blood vessels, in turn increasing blood flow to the heart.

Visit the National Stroke Association website for more information on how you can prevent stroke.

-Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

National Stroke Association (accessed 2017 April 10) “What is Stroke?” http://www.stroke.org/understand-stroke/what-stroke

Preidt, R. (2017 April 5) “Fitness, Not Fat, Is Key to Post-Stroke Recovery” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164476.html

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Can Exercise Improve Brain Health?

Staying active is well-known for helping to maintain heart health.  However, did you know that regular exercise may also benefit brain health?  A recent study has found that exercising 2.5 hours a week, or 30 minutes a day for 5 days a week, may help slow progression of Parkinson’s disease.walking, exercise, Parkinson's, brain health

Parkinson’s disease is a chronic and progressive movement disorder that may worsen over time. Therefore, medication and surgery have currently been used to treat and manage the symptoms of the condition.  This condition involves the progressive death of brain cells, which leads to a decrease in dopamine levels in the blood. Lower dopamine levels result in a lessened ability to move.  Therefore, since those with Parkinson’s disease lose dopamine over time, they may subsequently experience tremors, stiffness, and trouble with walking.

Exercise and Parkinson’s Disease 

A recent study in the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease looked at the effects of exercise on the progression of Parkinson’s disease. After observing 3400 patients for over two years, those people with Parkinson’s disease who maintained exercise 150 minutes per week had a smaller decline in quality of life and mobility as compared to those who exercised less. The type of exercise that was of most benefit was not apparent. However, it is suggested that finding a type of exercise an individual enjoys will help them to maintain a regular exercise regimen and in turn will benefit them. Furthermore, by empowering those with Parkinson’s disease to engage in more exercise they enjoy, it may improve overall quality of life for these individuals.

Joint Pain and Quality of Life

Even if you do not have Parkinson’s disease, you may experience joint pain that limits your movement.  Limited movement may in turn reduce quality of life by:

  • affecting heart health
  • making an individual more dependent on others for daily activities
  • reducing the amount of serotonin”feel good” hormone produced

Therefore, it is important to find effective treatments for joint pain that will help make movement more comfortable.  When movement is more comfortable, you will be more likely to engage in more activity, and in turn will gain the most health benefits. Also, the American Psychological Association has reported that regular exercise may help reduce panic in those with anxiety and improve mood in those with depression. Furthermore, regular exercise has been found to normalize sleep patterns, which in turn can make it easier for the body and mind to handle stress.

Some effective treatments for joint pain include:

  • CDC Self-management programs
  • Acupuncture
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications
  • Water-based exercises such as swimming
  • Supplements such as glucosamine or Flexova

Furthermore, Flexova contains a blend of B vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin A, as well as glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate that helps to reduce joint pain and improve joint mobility.  Therefore, for more information on Flexova and other high quality supplements that can help improve your quality of life, visit Vita Sciences.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources :

Arthritis Foundation (accessed 2017 April 2) “25 Treatments for Hip and Arthritis Pain” http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/pain-management/tips/25-treatments-for-hip-knee-oa.php

Centers for Disease Control (2017 March 7) “Living with Severe Joint Pain” https://www.cdc.gov/features/arthritis-quality-life/

Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (accessed 2017 April 2) “What is Parkinson’s Disease?” http://www.pdf.org/about_pd

Preidt, R. (2017 March 29) “Exercising 2.5 Hours a Week May Slow Parkinson’s Progress” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164357.html

Weir, K. (2011 December) “The Exercise Effect” American Psychological Association. http://www.apa.org/monitor/2011/12/exercise.aspx

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Three Natural Ingredients that could Relieve your Neuropathy Pain Today

by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Numbness, tingling, and sharp burning pain in your feet or hands could be signs of a serious condition. Nerves control your senses, muscle movement, as well as blood pressure, heart rate, digestion, and bladder function. Neuropathy is a condition that affects one or more nerves in the body.    If left untreated, this condition could lead to a lack of coordination and falling, muscle weakness, or paralysis if the motor nerves are affected.

What Causes Neuropathy?

Untreated cases of diabetes may lead to neuropathy, but there are many other possible causes of the condition such as:

  • Alcoholism, in which a person can develop thiamine deficiency
  • Autoimmune diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis
  • Infections such as hepatitis C or HIV
  • Trauma or pressure on the nerves such as by injury or tumors
  • Conditions such as hypothyroidism, kidney disease, or liver disease
  • Vitamins deficiencies such as thiamin, B6, B12, or vitamin E

Neuropathy Treatment

The goal of neuropathy treatment is to manage and relieve symptoms.  Many approved treatments are out there, but not all are as effective in providing relief.  Pain relievers such as NSAIDS, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can treat mild pain for a short time.  Narcotics, anti-seizure medications such as gabapentin, or topical treatments such as lidocaine may be used to treat more moderate to severe cases.

Prescribed medicines may be prescribed alongside treatments such as physical therapy, acupuncture, or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS).  Surgery is used as a last resort for those cases in which there is pressure on the nerves such as with tumors.

Recent research

Several research studies have shown natural supplements to be effective in reducing symptoms of neuropathy.

  • A 2016 study in the journal Diabetic Medicine showed significant improvements in diabetic peripheral neuropathy symptoms through use of alpha-lipoic acid treatment.
  • In the Journal of Diabetes Research, a 2016 study revealed that a combination of gabapentin, B1, and B12 was just as effective as the drug pregabalin in reducing severity of neuropathy symptoms. The addition of vitamins also helped reduce the presence of side effects such as vertigo or dizziness.
  • A recent study in the Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology journal showed potential for vitamin E treatment to be used to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.
  • A 2016 study in Minerva Endocrinologica showed an increased antioxidant capacity when using alpha-lipoic acid as a treatment for diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

These findings reveal that more natural treatments, alone or with other treatments, may provide relief to neuropathy pain with a lower risk of side effects than with other prescription medications.

For a strong and effective treatment, with the gentle touch and benefits of natural ingredients, try Nervex Neuropathy Pain Relief Cream. The active ingredients of this topical cream include:

  • Vitamins B12, B6, thiamine, and riboflavin, which improve nerve function
  • Capsaicin, a hot pepper extract that relieves pain
  • Alpha-lipoic acid, an antioxidant that reduces damage to nerves by removing free radicals from your organs and tissues

Be sure to talk with your healthcare provider before starting any new medication or treatment.

A big thank you to the wonderful work of the Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy for raising awareness of the condition and funding efforts to find a cure.  Visit their website at https://www.foundationforpn.org/ to follow their efforts.

Sources:

Alvarado, A.M. & S.A. Navarro (2016) “Clinical Trial Assessing the Efficacy of Gabapentin Plus B Complex (B1/B12) versus Pregabalin for Treating Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.”

Brami, C. et al. (2016 Feb). “Natural products and complementary therapies for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: A systematic review.” Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, 98:325-34.

Cakici, N. et al. (2016 Nov) “Systematic review of treatments for peripheral neuropathy” Diabetic Medicine, 33(11):1466-1476.

Han, Y., et al. (2016 Nov 30) “Differential efficacy of methylcobalamin and alpha-lipoic acid treatment on negative and positive symptoms of (type 2) diabetic peripheral neuropathy.” Minerva Endocrinologica

 

 

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For diabetic neuropathy, R-ALA is an important nutrient.

20 of the Best Diabetes Websites

For managing diabetes, information can be a lifesaver. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with diabetes, then it’s important to start educating yourself immediately. If you’ve been managing symptoms of type-1 or type-2 diabetes for years, then it’s helpful to check up on recent medical breakthroughs in glucose management and diabetic neuropathy.

Listed are 20 influential websites that provide a wealth of tips, resources, and medical advice for all aspects of diabetes. These include advocacy groups, community support forums, links databases, and medical information.

Tip: If you take metformin, then you may be at risk for severe vitamin B12 deficiency!  Here are some excellent B12 Patches for diabetics, and a vitamin B12 cream

Nervex is also very helpful for diabetic neuropathy, as it helps to provide natural nutritional support for nerve cell integrity.

20 of the Best Diabetes Websites

  1. SelfGrowth– Our company’s mission is to provide informative, quality Self Improvement and Natural Health information to help people improve their lives. We provide information ranging from Goal Setting and Stress Management to Natural Health and Alternative Medicine.
  2. Diabetes Self Management– Diabetes Self-Management is a publisher of authoritative, reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.
  3. Healio Diabetes Page– Designed as an in-depth specialty clinical information website, Healio.com features the industry’s best news reporting, dynamic multimedia, question-and-answer columns, CME and other educational activities in a variety of formats, quick reference content, blogs, peer-reviewed journals and a full line of popular book titles.
  4. Physician’s Briefing- Diabetes– By HealthDay, informational website with a large database of medical articles on diabetes and other illnesses.
  5. Pawluk– Board-Certified Family Physician, has training in Acupuncture, homeopathy, hypnosis and bodywork, is a national expert in the medical use of electromagnetics and energy medicine for more than 22 years.
  6. Healing Diabetes– Finding how to cure my diabetes is one of my missions in life and in this blog I share my experiences, research and advice on how to better control glucose and/or cure diabetes.
  7. T Minus Two– Personal blog on diabetes and mental health.
  8. endocrineweb– EndocrineWeb’s goal has been to provide patients with accurate and current information about endocrine disorders. In clear, straightforward language, we explain the causes and symptoms of these disorders and how they can be treated.
  9. Diabetes Developments– blog page for David Mendosa, freelance medical writer, advocate, and consultant specializing in diabetes.
  10. com Diabetes Health– About.com health section, administrated by diabetes expert Barbie Cervoni, RD, CDE.
  11. Healthline Diabetes– Healthline’s mission is to make the people of the world healthier through the power of information. We do this by creating quality health information that is authoritative, approachable, and actionable.
  12. butyoudontlooksick– Creator of the Spoon theory, online magazine about living life to the fullest with any disability, invisible disease, or chronic pain and features a collection of articles, personal stories, book and product reviews, health resource.
  13. American Diabetes Association– Advocacy network with a large selection of information, tips, and awareness campaigns for diabetes.
  14. Neuro Talk- Diabetes/Insulin Resistance / Metabolic Syndrome– Neuropathy community forum, this section focuses on all topics related to diabetes.
  15. Six Until Me– Personal blog about life with type 1 diabetes.
  16. The Girl’s Guide to Diabetes– Personal blog with resources, links and articles for diabetes among women.
  17. The Diabetes Resource– Very large database with hundreds of links to resources, medical articles, and parenting tips for diabetes.
  18. Diabetes Digest– Easy-to-read, up-to-date articles about all aspects of managing your diabetes, including weight control, blood glucose monitoring and medications.
  19. We Are Diabetes– We Are Diabetes is an organization primarily devoted to promoting support and awareness for the eating disorder diabulimia. We are dedicated to providing support, hope and resources to those who suffer from diabulimia, as well as to their families and loved ones.
  20. Children With Diabetes– The online community for kids, families and adults with diabetes.

Do you have any diabetes pages that you’d like to suggest? Please feel free to comment below!

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For diabetic neuropathy, R-ALA is an important nutrient.

Alpha Lipoic Acid for Diabetes- R-ALA Benefits

R Lipoic Acid, an over-the-counter antioxidant, is a powerful supplement for people suffering from neuropathy. Using Alpha Lipoic Acid for diabetes is a proven method for enhancing nerve cell functioning and relieving common symptoms of numbness, pain, itching and burning in the hands and legs.

What is R-ALA?

Alpha-lipoic acid is a nutrient that contains antioxidant properties. The R form, R-ALA, is the only type of alpha lipoic acid that your body is able to absorb thoroughly through the skin.

R-ALA is a superior form of antioxidant, as it helps to maintain healthy levels of other antioxidants, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, and Coenzyme Q-10. It also has therapeutic properties in helping to prevent signs of aging and sustaining a normal response to inflammation.

Alpha Lipoic Acid for Diabetes

Alpha lipoic acid has been the focus of numerous placebo-based studies on diabetic neuropathy, autoimmune disorder, and insulin resistance. For peripheral neuropathy, R-ALA destroys free radicals that trigger common symptoms of painful numbness, tingling, burning, and itching. Alpha lipoic acid may also be helpful for autonomic neuropathy symptoms that occur with diabetes, as well.

For diabetes, R-ALA increases antioxidant action and also promotes good circulation in the blood vessels adjacent to your nerve endings.

In a famous study, diabetic patients saw improvement after only a few weeks of alpha lipoic acid treatments.

“But it didn’t act only as a pain medication,” says neurologist Peter Dyck, MD. “Alpha lipoic acid seems to actually change the metabolism of the nerve or blood supply to the nerve, and we noted some relief in symptoms.”

Where the placebo group reported little change by the end of the study, the participants who received alpha lipoic acid treatments reported a dramatic decrease in pain symptoms by six points.

 

How does R-ALA help?

Alpha lipoic acid helps in many ways:

  • R-ALA helps to maintain healthy levels of antioxidant vitamins such as vitamin C and vitamin E.
  • It promotes good nerve cell functioning with diabetes.
  • Alpha lipoic acid is essential for breaking down of carbohydrates and producing energy.
  • R lipoic acid helps to protect your nervous system from harmful free radicals in pollution and chemicals.
  • People suffering from nerve pain have found optimal results with daily use of alpha lipoic acid supplements.

Where can I find R-ALA?

Alpha lipoic acid occurs naturally in many food items such as meat, but for neuropathy sufferers, it’s important to get more. In many studies, R-ALA is most helpful when dispersed directly into the bloodstream.

Nervex Neuropathy Pain Cream contains rich amounts of R-ALA, plus other helpful nutrients that promote good neurological health and relief from common aches and pains.

Buy Nervex neuropathy cream now

 

Buy Nervex Now! $19.95

Also read: Capsaicin Cream for Nerve Pain

Sources:

Antioxidant Soothes Diabetic Neuropathy: WebMD

University of Maryland Medical Center

NCBI: Alpha-Lipoic Acid and Diabetic Neuropathy

The Sensory Symptoms of Diabetic Polyneuropathy Are Improved With α-Lipoic Acid

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35 Signs of Neuropathy to Watch

The most common signs of neuropathy are chronic pain and numbness in the extremities (hands and feet), but there are many other important symptoms that sufferers don’t know to look out for. See this list of the most common signs of neuropathy.

35 common symptoms of neuropathy

If you experience any of the symptoms listed below frequently, then it’s important to tell your doctor immediately.

Neuropathy can occur from vitamin B12 deficiency, autoimmune illness, diabetes, alcoholism or several other underlying conditions.

35 signs of neuropathy

In a survey conducted on nearly 1,000 people diagnosed with some type of neuropathy, the majority reported experiencing some of the following symptoms moderately or severely:

  1. Tingling, stinging in the hands and feet
  2. Crushing fatigue
  3. Weak muscles
  4. Burning  sensations
  5. Chronic pain
  6. Painful numbness in the hands and feet
  7. Hypersensitivity in pain points on body
  8. Difficulty standing or sitting for long stretches
  9. Difficulty walking, gait disturbances
  10. Balance problems, dizziness
  11. Sensitivity to very cold and very hot temperatures
  12. Muscle spasms, twitching
  13. Fluctuating body temperature
  14. Pain that worsens in the evenings
  15. Itching in the extremities
  16. Lightheadedness when getting up
  17. Eye problems
  18. Crawling sensation
  19. Constipation
  20. Reduced reaction to pain stimulus
  21. Scalp irritation, itching
  22. Changes in perspiration
  23. Vertigo
  24. Diarrhea
  25. Increased heart rate
  26. Urinary Incontinence
  27. Reduced sensitivity to changes in temperature
  28. Nausea
  29. Head pain
  30. Reduced appetite
  31. Impotency
  32. Frequent urinary tract infections (UTI’s)
  33. Unhealthy weight loss
  34. Frequent vomiting
  35. Facial swelling

Neuropathy treatments

Treatment for neuropathy depends on the cause. For diabetic neuropathy, it’s important to wear tight socks and check your hands and feet frequently for cuts and bruises. Also, if you take metformin, then you may need to supplement with vitamin B12 regularly, as this diabetes drug prevents proper absorption of vitamin B12 in food, leading to vitamin B12 deficiency.

Peripheral neuropathy is a typical symptom of pernicious anemia (autoimmune vitamin B12 deficiency), so again vitamin B12 is rated as a crucial supplement for preventing symptoms.

Other treatments that help with neuropathy are pain relief creams, alcohol avoidance, exercise, smoking cessation, prescription medications for neuropathy.

What other signs of neuropathy have you experienced? If you found this helpful, then please share with others who suffer from neuropathy or are involved in neuropathy awareness groups.

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