Category Archives: diabetes medicine

Could a new diabetes medicine help you lose weight?

nutrition, dietitian, health, diabetes, diet, weight lossWhen you have diabetes and are overweight, your doctor may say that a small amount of weight loss could help control your condition. However, if you have to take insulin to control your blood glucose levels, weight loss can be very difficult. Therefore, it is encouraging to report that a new diabetes medicine may help those with diabetes who are obese to lose weight.

Insulin and Weight Gain

According to Joslin Diabetes Center, those with diabetes on insulin may have a challenging time losing weight. This is because when people with diabetes first start taking insulin, the body is finally getting the glucose in the cells where it was previously low. In turn, this energy that the cells start taking in lead to weight gain. It is important to note though, that an initial weight gain with the start of insulin treatment is a good sign that the body is working to get your blood glucose levels back in control. However, weight loss is not impossible for those with diabetes on insulin. With the proper supervision and treatment plan by your diabetes health care provider, those with diabetes can lose weight.

Diabetes Medicine and Weight Loss Research

A recent study found that a new diabetes medicine may help those who are obese without diabetes to lose weight. This new diabetes medicine, semaglutide, has a similar chemical structure to the hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). GLP-1 helps to regulate secretion of insulin as well as appetite. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the semaglutide injection Ozempic as a once-weekly supplement to diet and exercise to help those with type 2 diabetes control their blood glucose levels.

The one-year study done on semaglutide looked at nearly 1000 participants with obesity and without diabetes. Study results found that this treatment was effective as a weight loss treatment.  Different study groups were given different dosages of the treatment (.05-.4 milligrams injection daily).  Comparison groups were given  a placebo or a different diabetes medicine called liraglutide. All groups were provided monthly diet and exercise counseling.

  • All groups that received semaglutide lost significantly more weight than those in the placebo group.
  • The highest dose group (.4 milligram injection daily) lost the most weight, nearly 5 times more than the placebo group.
  • Researchers suggest that more studies could help fully explore the weight loss potential of semaglutide.

Other Ways to Lose Weight With Diabetes

Outside of prescription medicines, there are several lifestyle factors that can be adjusted to help those with diabetes lose weight.

  • Eat a healthier diet. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), those with diabetes should work with their doctor and a dietitian. They can help you learn how to create a healthy, balanced meal plan.  A diabetes-friendly meal plan should focus on healthy carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables, fiber-rich whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy.  Learning appropriate portion sizes and limiting eating out are other strategies to help you lose weight.
  • Exercise more.  When you exercise, insulin becomes more sensitive. In other words, exercise helps your muscle cells to better use the available insulin. In turn, the insulin works to better take up glucose into the cells and use it as energy during and after activity. This helps lower your blood glucose levels. However, it is important to note that those taking insulin to help control their blood glucose levels should adjust their insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake around the time they exercise to avoid a glucose low, or hypoglycemia.  Check out the American Diabetes Association site or talk to your healthcare provider about ways to avoid hypoglycemia during and after exercise.
  • Drink plenty of water each day to help prevent drinking your calories from sugary drinks. Most of your body is made up of water. Therefore, drinking plenty of water each day can help you maintain optimal health. In addition, people with diabetes need more water when blood glucose levels are high.  Studies show that increased water intake can help those with diabetes better control blood glucose levels.  The average adult should drink about half of your body weight in ounces of water each day. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, then you should drink 100 ounces of fluid each day, or about 12.5 cups of water. Increased water intake can also help you feel fuller longer and prevent dehydration. In turn, increased water intake can help you manage you weight and increase energy over time.
  • Take diabetes-friendly supplements such as Glucarex by Vita Sciences. Glucarex contains compounds such as chromium, alpha lipoic aicd and cinnamon to help support blood glucose levels. Such ingredients can help support weight loss and a healthy metabolism.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

American Diabetes Association (last edited September 25, 2017) “Blood Glucose and Exercise.”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (December 18, 2017) “Eat Well!”

Diabetes.co.uk (accessed March 19, 2018) “Water and Diabetes.”

Joslin Diabetes Center (accessed March 19, 2018) “Insulin and Weight Gain.”

Science Daily (March 18, 2018) “New diabetes drug may help people with obesity lose weight.”


  • Did you like this? Please share.

    Could more fiber improve your diabetes?

    fruits, vegetables, fiber, healthEat your veggies, they say. Whether you are trying to lose weight, improve your blood pressure, or just simply trying to live well, you may be told to eat more fiber in your diet. Fiber is not only good for managing weight or keeping your heart healthy though. A recent study has found that more fiber in your diet may actually help improve the health of those with type 2 diabetes.

    What is fiber?

    Fiber is a type of carbohydrate found in certain foods that is not digested in the body.  Therefore, when consumed, it provides many health benefits such as:

    • making you feel fuller longer
    • slowing down digestion so more nutrients can be absorbed from the foods you eat
    • bulking your stool, in turn helping improve digestive health
    • helping to lower cholesterol levels in the blood

    In addition, fiber intake can help control blood glucose levels. A healthy, balanced diet should include such fiber-rich foods as:

    • fruits and vegetables
    • high-fiber cereals made with bran or whole grains
    • whole grains such as oats, quinoa, or corn
    • high-fiber pastas such as bean, lentil-based, or whole wheat
    • brown or wild rice
    • nuts, nut butters, and seeds such as flax seed, sunflower seeds, and chia seeds

    A study in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that people who consumed 50 grams of fiber each day were able to control their blood glucose levels much better than those who ate far less.  However, since most Americans only consume on average 15 to 18 grams of fiber each day, this task would be impossible. Therefore, most adults should consume between 20 and 35 grams of fiber each day for optimal health. If you consume between 2 cups of both fruits and vegetables each day, you can easily hit this daily goal.

    Fiber and diabetes

    Type 2 diabetes is the type of diabetes that develops when the pancreas makes too little insulin or the body cannot use insulin very well. In turn, people with type 2 diabetes have trouble controlling their blood glucose levels since insulin is a hormone in charge of using glucose for energy in the body.

    Within the digestive system, certain bacteria are in charge of breaking down carbohydrates  in the body. These broken down carbohydrates produce short chain fatty acids that help reduce inflammation in the gut and control appetite. Recent study findings show that a shortage of these amino acids may increase risk of type 2 diabetes.

    A recent study based in China looked at the effect of a high fiber diet on those with type 2 diabetes. One group of adults with type 2 diabetes were given standard dietary recommendations and patient education. The other group was given a high fiber diet. After 12 weeks, the group of patients on the high fiber diet had had greater reduction in their HgA1C, or three month average of blood glucose levels. In addition, their fasting blood glucose levels and weight dropped more than those not on the high fiber diet.

    Other ways to help control your diabetes

    In addition to consuming more fiber, there are several other ways you can help control your diabetes.

    • Know your numbers such as blood glucose levels, HgA1C, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol levels. Keeping track of these numbers will help you see where you stand in terms of heart health and controlling your diabetes. This way, if your numbers are reaching unhealthy levels, then you can take action before complications arise.
    • Stay active for at least 30 minutes a day of moderate activity most days of the week. Moderate activity includes walking, water aerobics, light dancing, and gardening, to name a few. A step counter or fitness tracking device can be helpful to keep track of your movements each day and keep you accountable.
    • Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. Also, when you are increasing your fiber intake, it is important to drink plenty of water to avoid constipation.  Water is an important nutrient to help flush waste out of the body and keep the body functioning effectively.
    • Meet with your healthcare provider on a regular basis to help control and treat your diabetes and keep track of any risk factors. In addition, your healthcare provider can provide support if you have any questions or concerns in regards to your overall health.
    • Take supplements as needed such as vitamins for any deficiencies you may have as well as supplements such as Glucarex by Vita Sciences. Glucarex contains ingredients such as alpha lipoic acid and cinnamon that have been shown to support healthy blood glucose levels.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    Sources:

    Joslin Diabetes Center (accessed on March 12, 2018) “How Does Fiber Affect Blood Glucose Levels?” 

    National Center for Health Statistics (March 2017) “NCHS Nutrition Data.”

    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (January 2016) “4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life.”

    Rutgers University (March 8, 2018) “Fiber-fermenting bacteria improve health of type 2 diabetes patients.”


  • Did you like this? Please share.