Category Archives: Chronic Pain

Can you treat a migraine without pain medicine?

migraine, headache, medicine, painIf you have ever had a migraine headache, you know the pain is so intense that a trip to the hospital may be in store.  In this case, the ER staff may use an opioid  pain medicine as a first resort. However, a recent study has shown that this commonly used drug, also known for its addictive qualities, may not be the best choice for migraine relief.

What is a migraine?

A migraine headache involves a throbbing pain, usually on one side of the head, usually along with other symptoms. Nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, and sensitivity to light are some of the most common symptoms of such headaches. Pain can occur for hours, or even days, and warning symptoms such as  constipation, mood changes, neck stiffness, increased thirst, or frequent yawning may precede a migraine.  In rare cases, right before a migraine you may get aura symptoms such as flashes of light or blind spots.  In the 24 hours after, you may have symptoms such as confusion, moodiness, dizziness, and weakness.

Aspirin, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or a combination of acetaminophen, aspirin and caffeine may be used for treatment of most migraines. More severe cases may require medications such as Triptan or Ergot, which help constrict blood vessels and block pain pathways.  However, opioids are used if a person cannot tolerate such medicines.

Migraine Relief Research

A recent study in the journal Neurology looked at 127 patients who had at least trips to the New York emergency department for migraine headaches.  Half of the patients received the opioid hydromorphone and the other half received an IV of the dopamine-releasing drug prochlorperazine.

After 48 hours of treatment, sixty-percent of people from the prochlorperazine group versus thirty-percent of the hydromorphone group felt relief.  In addition, the prochlorperazine group was 30-percent less likely to ask for more pain medicine after treatment than the opioid group (6-percent versus 36-percent).  This study suggests that anti-dopaminergic drugs may provide more relief to migraine headache sufferers than opioids. However, you should be sure to talk with your healthcare provider to find the best treatment for you.

Natural Ways to Relieve Migraine Pain

  • Learn to cope (LTC) : This treatment gradually exposes patients to headache triggers to help them become desensitized to such triggers.
  • Practice consistent overall wellness: Be sure to get a good night’s sleep of at least 6 to 8 hours of sleep each night and eat healthy, balanced meals every day. Also, be sure to find healthy ways to manage stress such as doing yoga, engaging in relaxation breathing, or taking a walk daily.
  • Stay active: Regular exercise can help not only manage stress, but can also prevent migraines.  Exercise reduces such headaches by reducing tension in the body. Furthermore, staying active can help reduce body weight.  Since obesity is thought to be a risk factor for migraine headaches, weight loss could reduce such risk.
  • Other medicinal treatments: Cardiovascular or anti-seizure drugs, antidepressants, and Botox may be prescribed to help prevent migraine headaches. However, for the more natural route, reach for Migravent by Vita Sciences.  Migravent contains natural ingredients such as PA-free butterbur, CoQ10, magnesium,  and riboflavin. This formula has been found to help prevent migraines and support reduced frequency of such headaches and related symptoms.

Disclaimer: Please be sure to talk to your healthcare provider before starting any new medication.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

Mayo Clinic (April 26, 2017) “Migraine”

Medline Plus (October 18, 2017) “Skip Opioid Treatment for Migraine in the ER”

Did you like this? Please share.

Could common painkillers cause high blood pressure?

pain, over the counter, medicineWhen you take a medicine over the counter, you likely focus mostly on the  benefits it can provide you.  However, it’s possible to experience some harmful health effects from use of over-the-counter medicines.  A recent study has found that some common painkillers used by those with arthritis may cause high blood pressure.

What is arthritis?

Arthritis is the inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. It can cause pain, redness, and swelling as well as joint damage, if not treated.  These symptoms can arise due to the rubbing of bone to bone together when the tissue lining the joints is worn down.The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Osteoarthritis affects mostly the fingers, knees, and hips, while RA is an autoimmune disorder that affects hands, feet, as well as internal systems. Many people with arthritis find relief with common pain medicines such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

NSAIDs, help to decrease pain by blocking the production of body chemicals that cause inflammation and swelling. Some side effects of taking NSAIDs can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gas, and bloating. However, in some people, long-term use of NSAIDs can also cause high blood pressure.

High blood pressure occurs when the systolic pressure of the contraction is around 140 or higher and the diastolic pressure, or the pressure in between heart beats, is above 90. A study in the European Heart Journal looked at over 400 patients with arthritis.  Study subjects were given either the prescription pain reliever Celebrex, the NSAIDS naproxen or ibuprofen, or placebo.  With the use of NSAIDs, both systolic and diastolic pressure were increased.

Other ways to reduce arthritis pain

  • Keep your weight down since extra weight can place unnecessary pressure on your joints. Losing weight through diet and exercise can release some of this pressure and prevent damage to joints that may occur with prolonged pressure.
  • Exercise can reduce joint pain caused by arthritis. Low-impact exercises such as walking and water aerobics can aid in such pain relief.
  • See your doctor regularly. Your healthcare provider can adjust medications or supplements as necessary to help reduce any symptoms you may have.
  • Use pain-reducing supplements such as Flexova by Vita Sciences. Flexova contains powerful ingredients such as glucosamine and chondroitin, which can help support joint flexibility and ease of movement.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

Cleveland Clinic (2016) “Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)” https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/non-steroidal-anti-inflammatory-medicines-nsaids

Dallas, M.E. (August 30, 2017) “Common Painkillers May Boost Blood Pressure in Arthritis Patients” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_168117.html

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (April 2017) “Living With Arthritis: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family” https://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/arthritis/default.asp

Did you like this? Please share.

Can Yoga Soothe Back Pain?

Yoga may bring images of flexible lean figures bending their bodies in all different directions. Therefore, yoga may not come to mind when it comes to a solution for back pain.  yogaHowever, research shows that yoga can soothe back pain as well as physical therapy.

According to the National Institutes of Health, yoga is a mind and body practice that involves physical postures, breathing techniques, as well as methods of meditation and relaxation.  Yoga is good for improving muscle tone and strength, improving respiration, and reducing weight, among other things.

A recent study at Boston Medical Center looked at 320 patients that had persistent back pain for 12 weeks. The patients were assigned to either 12 weekly yoga classes, 15 physical therapy sessions, or  a book on how to manage back pain.  Nearly one-half of those who took yoga classes had “clinically meaningful” improvement. Also, 37-percent of physical therapy patients and 23-percent of book group patients, respectively felt similar improvement. The difference between the yoga and physical therapy results was not considered significant.

The lead researcher noted that both the yoga and physical therapy patients had pain relief for 12 months. However, he also suggests that not all forms of yoga are appropriate for those with back pain. The gentle yoga used in the study offered chairs and props. Therefore the study yoga was easy on the joints versus other types of yoga.

Yoga, however, is not effective for everyone with pain issues.  Acupuncture, massage, or natural supplements such as Vita Science’s Relocane can also help relieve pain.  Relocane contains natural ingredients such as turmeric and ginger that can decrease inflammation and help relieve minor aches, pains, and muscle cramps.  Use this supplement by Vita Sciences as part of your daily health regimen to feel your best. However, be sure to talk to your healthcare provider before starting any new supplement or exercise program.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

American Osteopathic Association (accessed June 26. 2017) “The Benefits of Yoga” http://www.osteopathic.org/osteopathic-health/about-your-health/health-conditions-library/general-health/Pages/yoga.aspx

Medline Plus (June 19, 2017) “Yoga Soothes Back Pain” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166742.html

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (August 26, 2016) “Yoga” https://nccih.nih.gov/health/yoga

Did you like this? Please share.

Can Knee Crackles and Pops lead to Arthritis?

When you walk up the stairs does it sound like popcorn popping? Do you feel swelling in those joints after extended movement or climbing up and down stairs? Snapping, cracking, or popping sounds in your knees may be an early sign of arthritis.

Arthritis is an informal way of referring to joint pain or disease. Common symptoms of the knee, arthritis, paincondition include:

  • pain
  • swelling
  • stiffness
  • decreased range of motion

Symptoms of such joint pain may come and go, but if untreated may worsen over time. Severe arthritis may cause permanent joint damage, chronic pain, and may make mobility painful and difficult. Therefore, it is important to treat joint pain as soon as you discover symptoms, no matter how mild they may seem.

A recent study in the journal Arthritis Care & Research looked at 3500 adults ranging in age from 45 to 79 years old and at risk for joint disease. The study found that those middle to older aged adults who heard cracking in their knees often were likely to develop arthritis in the next year.  For example, those that reported hearing their knee crackle “sometimes” or “often” were nearly twice as likely to develop arthritis in the next year as those who reported “never” (8% vs. 4.5%). Furthermore, those who reported hearing their knees crackle “always” were nearly three times more likely to develop the condition in the next year as compared to those who reported “never” (11% vs. 4.5%).

How to Treat Joint Pain

Be sure to visit your healthcare provider if you experience joint pain.  Not only can they provide medications that may help to relieve pain, but they may also be able to take x-rays and blood tests that could check to see if you may have arthritis.

Other ways you can treat joint pain include:

  • Gentle stretching exercises
  • Warm shower
  • Ice packs in the sore area
  • Resting the sore joint

Maintaining a healthy weight by staying active and eating healthy can also reduce joint pain. A joint-healthy diet contains plenty of calcium-rich foods such as milk, yogurt, and other low-fat dairy products as well as leafy green veggies like spinach and kale. Other vitamins and nutrients may also help with the prevention and treatment of joint pain such as the following:

  • Omega-3 fatty acids such as those found in fatty fish, plant-based oils, olives, nuts, and seeds have been found to reduce inflammation in those people who experience joint pain.
  • Glucosamine, a supplement made from the shells of crustaceans such as lobster, crab and shrimp, has been found to decrease joint pain and stiffness.
  • Capsaicin, such as that found in some analgesics, has been found to help rub out mild joint pain.
  • Osteovent by Vita Sciences contains a combination of joint-healthy supplements such as vitamin D, calcium, magnesium, vitamin K, and boron that have been shown to promote strong bones.

You can also visit the Arthritis Foundation website for more information on joint pain research, treatment, and prevention. arthritis, joint pain

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

Sources:

Arthritis Foundation (accessed May 14, 2017) “What is Arthritis?”  & “51 Ways to Be Good to Your Joints” http://www.arthritis.org/

Medline Plus (May 5, 2017) “Do Your Knees Crackle and Pop?” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165268.html

NIAMS (July 2014) “Living with Arthritis: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family” https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Arthritis/default.asp#d

Did you like this? Please share.

100 Best Sites for Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Patients- the Master List

Great for fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue advice, inspiration, or just connecting with fellow  FMS/CFS (fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue syndrome) sufferers. Lots of great blogs here from people with migraines, rheumatoid arthritis, as well.

fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue, chronic pain, migraines, spoonies, arthritis, lupus

Below is a conglomeration of personal blogs, government sites, forums and medical pages- some are funny and insightful, some provide lots of great tips on coping with the pain in your life, and some are inspirational…all are gems that we know you will appreciate.

Pick a few titles that look interesting, and stop by again to see all the other great sites we’ve posted here.

Remember, knowledge is power!

Help for Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue

The (best!) blogs out there!

Editor’s Note: This blog listing has been updated in order to provide you with the freshest, most relevant material available!

Please feel free to share this list and save it for future reference. Do you have a favorite chronic living blog that’s not listed here? Please comment below. Sharing is caring! <3

  1. A New Kind of Normal A New Kind of Normal is about to living boldly with chronic illness. Living boldly means standing
  2. A Picnic with Ants My life disABLED with Chrnoic Ilnnesses, it just IS. Taking one moment at a time. My journey with chronic illness, focusing mainly on Meniere’s Disease and Chronic Migraine.
  3. And then you’re at Jax  Always looking for the fun in the rheum. A unique perspective on having both Rheumatoid Arthritis and Type 1 Diabetes. Trying to find positivity and humor each day while dealing with painful, exhausting autoimmune diseases.
  4. Back Pain Blog UK  A PERSONAL JOURNEY OF A CHRONIC BACK PAIN SUFFERER. MY SITE IS FULL OF THE LATEST TREATMENTS, PRODUCT REVIEWS, THERAPIES, DRUGS, TIPS AND WEBSITES ON BACK PAIN, FIBROMYALGIA AND ARTHRITIC CONDITIONS.
  5. Being Fibro Mom Helping fibro sufferers become fibro thrivers.
  6. Being Matt Living the life you’re given. Journey of living with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and other unknown illnesses”
  7. BitterSweet Diagnosis Pancreatically challenged- Young Leader in Diabetes-  PhD student- Accredited Practising Dietitian. A blog on living life with diabetes, while completing my PhD in diabetes education and working as a dietitian.”
  8. Blooming Beauty Just a spoonie blogging about my life and experiences
  9. Body in Mind Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain.
  10. Brainless Blogger The blog covers the experience of living and coping with chronic migraines and fibromyalgia. I generalize many posts to simply talk about chronic pain and chronic illness as well. The blog posts research in those two areas as well.
  11. But You Don’t Look Sick We believe that our medical circumstances have put us in a unique and understanding position, so that we can help each other through similar difficult times. We hope the information and community on our site can aid people in leading better lives through knowledge, networking, friendship and most of all support.
  12. Capture Life’s Little Moments I blog about the day to day struggles of mental illness as well as chronic pain associated with having Fibromyalgia, chronic back pain and chronic neuropathic pain among other issues.
  13. Center for Disease Control & Prevention CDC Fibromyalgia page
  14. Charleigh Aleyna Raising Awareness for Functional Neurological Disorder
  15. Chronic Babe I created Chronic Babe to help you have an amazing life in spite of illness. I’ll help you gain new confidence, boost your career, nurture lifelong friendships, have great sex, save more money, and in general, be more fabulous.
  16. Chronic Illness Support More than anything, I hope this personal web site will connect us on a deeper level and find out more about how your illness may be more than a thorn — even an asset!
  17. Chronic Leigh’s Fibro Diary Based on a painfully true story. Fibromyalgia and chronic pain, SpoonSplained by someone who gets it.
  18. Chronic Mom A day in the life of a mom living with Fibromyalgia and Lyme disease
  19. Chronic Pain and Ramblings A day in the life of someone with debilitating pain.
  20. Chronic Pain Journal A journal, resource, and support for family, friends and patients of those who suffer from chronic pain
  21. Chronic Sex A safe place to discuss and ruminate on self-love, self-care, relationships, sex, and sexuality with chronic illness.
  22. Chronically 20 Something The adventures of a chronically ill twenty something year old woman. #spoonie. A little bit cynical but always hopeful blog about being chronically ill and twenty something.
  23. Chronically Ridiculous Invisible illness education, tips, and life experiences about living with chronically ridiculous illnesses.
  24. Chronically You… no matter how you feel COPD, Fibro, Chronic Pain, Heart Disease
  25. Claire’s Comfy Corner Life with Fibromyalgia.
  26. Confessions of a Fibro Mama The blog of a mama living, loving and being well with Fibromyalgia.
  27. Counting my Spoons Inspiring those living with chronic illness to live happily.
  28. Cranky Fibro Girl Harnessing the healing power of snark.
  29. Crazy Spoonie Life Living with fibromyalgia, hypothyroidism, IBS and depression.
  30. Cripple, baby! Mostly write about my illnesses and diagnosis but like to be able to laugh at myself too and have fun with it. Life is depressing enough so I enjoy mixing it up a little and write about good things too: My pets, vegan recipes, my charity, crafting, etc.
  31. Dangerously Normal Spoonie While battling Chronic Illness as well as Invisible Illness, I want to help others and make them aware that they are NOT alone!
  32. Diagnosed Not Defeated This is an informative blog about Type 2 diabetes. It features inspirational posts, travel tips, meal options, and so much more.
  33. Discovering Charlotte I’m a lifestyle blog while also living with fibromyalgia, depression and IBS.
  34. EDS Info Research and articles related to living with Chronic Pain from EDS & Fibromyalgia.
  35. Elaine4Queen Living with chronic migraine and fibromyalgia, and my dog, Poppet.
  36. Fed Up With Fatigue Living better with Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS/
  37. Fibro and Fabulous Fibro and Fabulous™ is a blog about my life, my Fibromyalgia, and my feeling fabulous despite my condition. Come feel fabulous with me!
  38. Fibro and M.E. Living with chronic conditions.
  39. Fibro Daze Attempting to make sense of the senseless: a Fibromyalgia diagnosis.
  40. Fibro Flutters Support Group Weblog for people with Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain, EDS/Hypermobility, Mental health, Chronic fatigue/Me & Invisible Illness in NE UK.
  41. Fibro Jedi Blogs and discussions surrounding Fibromyalgia, but also how I use gaming as a coping mechanism through the pain.
  42. Fibro Men Raising Awareness of the condition of Fibromyalgia among men.
  43. Fibro of Oz Blog  Following the yellow brick road in search for the answers of living with chronic illness.
  44. Fibro Warriors – Living Life The challenges of living with the up and down rollercoaster of living with a Chronic Pain Disease.
  45. FibroCathy’s Blog  Chronic pain is a challenge to your spirit, but a challenge that can always be faced and your situation improved.
  46. Fibromyalgia Action UK Fibromyalgia Action UK (FMAUK) is a registered charity raising awareness & making evidence-based information about Fibromyalgia easily accessible.
  47. Fibromyalgia Group Diaries Fibromyalgia Support Group- Member’s Diaries
  48. Fibromyalgia Support Free, Unbiased Sources of Information for Fibromyalgia sufferers and their caregivers.
  49. Fight like a Girl Club To provide a loving, comfortable environment where women battling cancer and other life-limiting diseases, survivors, and loved ones can come together to share stories, experiences, advice, encouragement, and hope with one another. Men are warmly welcomed, as well.
  50. Fighting Fatigue FightingFatigue.org is a top resource site for information on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Interstitial Cystitis, and other chronic illnesses.
  51. FM CFID Trigger Points MAY OUR SPIRIT FILL US WITH UNDERSTANDING OF VICTORY AND DEFEAT, THE GIFT OF COLLABORATION, THE WISDOM TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT PATH, AND OPPORTUNITIES TO INSPIRE HOPE.
  52. Healing Well Get on the road to healing well – join HealingWell.com, a thriving support community. You’ll find information, resources, and support, plus full access to the forums and chat rooms. And it’s all FREE!
  53. Health Skills For health professionals working in chronic pain self-management.
  54. Holding Your Spoons A blog about loving and supporting my husband in his fight against fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome/
  55. Hope for Heather Cowden Syndrome and Lhermitte-duclos disease are words not sentences.
  56. Hope Whispers A mother and wife and animal lover. Who just so happens to be on the liver transplant list. Sharing the good, the bad and the crazy.
  57. How To Cope With Pain Blog Chronic pain is a challenge to your spirit, but a challenge that can always be faced and your situation improved.
  58. Infertility Mom Bridging 2 very different worlds of 10+ years of infertility (including 3 miscarriages and 7 failed adoption attempts) followed by motherhood of 3 living miracles, InfertilityMom Jenni Saake shares about her daily life writing, juggling stroke recovery and chronic health challenges.
  59. Kirsty Ralph Lifestyle blog from blogger with diabetes and migraines.
  60. Knocked Over By A Feather IT WAS A BIG FEATHER…Living life with fibromyalgia, depression and anxiety.
  61. Laurie Erdman Freedom is only possible when love motivates your choices.
  62. Life and Fibromyalgia I teach music and sewing to the most amazing kids in the world. I also love reading blogs about other people’s life. I hope you enjoy reading mine. I also have fibromyalgia and arthritis.
  63. Lila Lost in the Fibro Fog I’M ALL A LONE, IN MY OWN LITTLE WORLD, BUT IT’S OK…. THEY KNOW ME HERE……..
  64. Living With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome I am a 26 year old male who has suffered from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis for over 8 years. This blog will focus on what I am trying to do to overcome this illness.
  65. Living with Fibro Online Support Group  We are patients living with fibromyalgia, here for your support.
  66. Living, Being, Doing with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome This is a blog aimed at providing information and support to those with the above conditions. I write about issues that affect all chronically ill people such as money, relationships and self-esteem.
  67. Make It, Bake It, Fake It Baking, creativity, and faith amidst a life with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
  68. Mama Sick My blog focuses on parents with chronic illnesses and the challenges they face raising children.
  69. Mayo Clinic Diseases and Conditions- Fibromyalgia
  70. mini2z – Journey With Me Journey with me on my journey with Hashimotos, LADA Type 1.5, Lupus and Fibromyalgia and learning to find my new normal with invisible illness.
  71. Mrs. Jeeby’s Survival Kit Sharing My Chronic Health Story – Helping You Share Yours. Chronic Illness/ Spoonie Blog sharing experience with have a chronic condition (Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.)
  72. My ADHD Life I am a blogger with ADHD. As Paul Simon sings, “I have a short little span of attention.” My interests change all the time – currently, mine are crocheting, sewing, organizing living spaces, and putting planners together.
  73. My Foggy Brain Invisible illness… visible me; living with fibromyalgia, depression and ADD.
  74. My Migraine Life The life of a chronic migraine sufferer. A mom, wife, friend and more trying to find health and balance in the most positive way possible.
  75. National Fibromyalgia Association Welcome to the NFA’s new and updated web site to keep you AWARE of all the most important information on fibromyalgia and related topics, and much, much more!
  76. National Library of Medicine MedLine Plus page for fibromyalgia. Trusted health information for you.
  77. Once Upon a Fibro Time Living life with Fibromyalgia and Joint hyper-mobility syndrome.
  78. Only in This Head My journey’s through chronic illness, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, POTS and Fibromyalgia. From personal musings to stuff I’ve tried to help with my illnesses, this blog is a very realistic portrait of one whom is way too young for that.
  79. Rockin RA To bring awareness, support and knowledge to those suffering from chronic pain and inflammation such rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia.
  80. Seeking Equilibrium HOW I DEAL WITH LIFE FROM THE WORLD OF FIBROMYALGIA AND CHRONIC PAIN.
  81. Simply Sugar & Gluten Free My food cravings, migraines, and depression vanished and was able to maintain a 60+ pound weight loss.  Join me as I create healthier food that’s SS&GF and delicious.
  82. Skillfully Well and Painfully Aware This blog is about living the chronic lifestyle, and trying to live it chronically well. I have various types of chronic pain (fibromyalgia, vulvodynia, and endometriosis).
  83. Survivor Living life with chronic pain, mental illness, and the ghosts of an abusive past.
  84. The American Fibromyalgia Syndrome Assoc, Inc Funding research on fibromyalgia. Improving the lives of millions.
  85. The CFIDS Association of America Make ME/CFS understood, diagnosable, and treatable.
  86. The Fibro Fog Those who suffer from any chronic illness, but main focus is on Fibromyalgia.
  87. The Fibromyalgia Experiment Fighting Fibro and Being Awesome…Taking Control of My Chronic Illness.
  88. The FMS Community Caring – Sharing – Understanding.
  89. The Hippy Geek  One woman’s experience of balancing nature and nerd.
  90. The Invisible F A blog about living with fibromyalgia and depression
  91. The Laundry Pile You never know what you will find in a pile of laundry…I blog about motherhood, Bible study, book reviews, and I share how I live life each day with Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue.
  92. The Life and Adventures of Cateepoo Living with rheumatoid arthritis has been a learning experience for me. I have followed several different paths that have taken me down a 100% alternative route as well as a conventional route.
  93. The Mud and the Lotus “There is the mud, and there is the lotus that grows out of the mud. We need the mud in order to make the lotus.” -Thich Nhat Hanh.
  94. The Sick and the Dating Navigating online dating while dealing with chronic illness.
  95. The Unbroken Smile Chronic pain lifestyle blog offering tips, stories, and support written by warriors who have went through it.
  96. WebMD Fibromyalgia Health Center.
  97. Women and Fibromyalgia Living with an invisible Dis-ease.
  98. Word Droppings Words about things. Here and there. Knitting. Cats. Writing. Current Events. Random. Allergies. Food. People. Chronic Illness. Marriage. Comics. Society.
  99. WriteMeWell Adventures of a clinical trial subject, life with celiac disease, fibromyalgia, and now after hysterectomy (and oophorectomy).
  100. Zebra Life Blog  When you hear hoof-beats, think horse not zebra…..not always!! Dealing with life with chronic illness-CVID & Fibromyalgia.

 

Is your blog listed here? Grab our badge and post on your site!

100 Best Sites for Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Patients- the Master List

<div class="grab-button" style="width: 200px; margin: 0 auto;">
<img src="http://blog.vitasciences.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/badge-1.png" alt="grab button for Vita Sciences" width="200" height="259">
<div style="margin: 0;
padding: 0;
border: 1px solid #dcdcdc;
background-color: #ffffff;
color: #000000;
width: 200px;
height: 259px;
overflow: scroll;">
&lt;div class="vita-sciences-button" style="width: 200px; margin: 0 auto;">
&lt;a href="http://blog.vitasciences.com/uncategorized/100-best-sites-fibromyalgia-chronic-fatigue-patients-master-list/" rel="nofollow">
&lt;img src="http://blog.vitasciences.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/badge-1.png" alt="Vita Sciences" width="200" height="259" />
&lt;/a>
&lt;/div>
</div>
</div>
Did you like this? Please share.

Overcome Fibromyalgia Pain with 11 Powerful Natural Supplements

Fibromyalgia is a musculoskeletal disorder that causes widespread “fibromyalgia pain,” in addition to crushing fatigue, insomnia, and problems with memory and mood. Often, vitamin deficiency occurs with fibromyalgia. For maximum health, always include these essential vitamins and minerals.

 

Overcome Fibromyalgia Pain with 11 Powerful Natural Supplements

Fibromyalgia pain management

People with fibromyalgia experience excruciating muscular soreness in the absence of apparent inflammation. Because the symptoms of fibromyalgia are “invisible,” most sufferers have difficulty getting a diagnosis or needed treatments in time to prevent devastating illness.

If you have fibromyalgia, then you may experience a combination of

  • wracking pain
  • numbness
  • tiredness
  • bloating
  • nausea
  • itchiness
  • anxiety
  • feverishness

Supplements that help

Fibromyalgia often occurs with comorbid conditions, such as gastritis or rheumatoid arthritis.  For optimal health, you should follow a regimen of natural supplements, in addition to your prescribed medications.

Note: if you suffer from fibromyalgia or other forms of chronic pain, please speak to a doctor for treatment options. This article is not intended to provide medical advice or a cure for fibromyalgia.

Capsaicin (Cayenne)

Capsaicin is a natural muscle relaxant that occurs naturally in many pepper varieties, but most abundantly in cayenne pepper. Capsaicin cream is used by people with chronic pain from shingles, fibromyalgia, peripheral neuropathy, and back pain.

Dose: When desired, you may apply liberal amounts of capsaicin cream.

Nervex Chronic Pain Management Cream

Nervex has Capsaicin, vitamin E, vitamin B12, vitamin D3, and other powerful inflammation-killers.  Buy it now!

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

If your body had a battery, Vitamin B1 would be the juice that keeps you ticking.  Vitamin B1 helps your body manufacture adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, an essential molecule that gives your body the energy it needs to keep your heart pumping and your lungs breathing.

Dose: For fibromyalgia, Crohn’s disease and folate deficiency, take at least 200 mg of thiamin per day.

Melatonin

Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by the pineal gland that promotes restful sleep. Melatonin supplements are helpful for people who don’t produce enough melatonin at nighttime and suffer from sleep disorders as a result. If fibromyalgia pain is keeping you up nights and causing insomnia, taking 3 mg of melatonin ½ hour before bedtime might help you get back to a normal sleep schedule, according to this report on melatonin in patients with fibromyalgia.

Maxasorb melatonin sleep cream

Take Maxasorb Melatonin Cream, and get to sleep quicker. Get it here.

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin that is only found in protein foods like meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and cheese.  Your body needs vitamin B12 for red blood cell circulation, nervous system maintenance, DNA synthesis, healthy cognitive functioning, and energy production.

If you have fibromyalgia, then you need to watch for vitamin B12 deficiency, since gastrointestinal disorder symptoms like diarrhea and vomiting that are common with fibromyalgia, and can interfere with vitamin B12 absorption.

Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are constant fatigue, depression, confused thinking, painful tingling-numbness in the hands and feet, sleeplessness, frequent clumsiness and stumbling, and sore, burning tongue.

Dose: For fibromyalgia and vitamin B12 deficiency, 1000 mcg of non-dietary vitamin B12 supplements per week provide optimal health.

Get more B12!

Maxasorb vitamin B12 skin cream lotion

Maxasorb vitamin B12 cream- 320 mic of B12 in 1 dose.

Magnesium

Like vitamin B1, magnesium is another nutrient that helps your body produce ATP for energy.  Magnesium aids in muscle relaxation and keeps calcium from entering the blood supply.

Magnesium is highly recommended to relax muscular tension in people with fibromyalgia, migraine headaches, and PMS.

Dose: Take 600 mg daily for optimum health.

Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol)

Your body needs two forms of vitamin D to survive- Vitamin D2, which is manufactured by plants, and vitamin D3, which your skin produces upon exposure to sunlight.  Vitamin D aids in calcium absorption for building strong healthy bones and retaining bone mass.

Dose: For fibromyalgia and other autoimmune diseases, take 1,000 IU per day for optimum health.

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)

DHA occurs naturally in fatty fish, and is essential for healthy brain development in infants and cognitive functioning in adults. DHA is also used successfully to life the mood and increase mental clarity in people who suffer “brain fog,” as evidenced by this study on Health benefits of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

Dose: For fibromyalgia, depression, rheumatoid arthritis, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), take 900 mg per day for optimum health.

D-ribose

D-ribose is a sugar that your body produces.  For people who suffer from fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue, taking extra D-ribose supplementation is helpful for boosting energy and building strong muscles.  D-ribose is also taken for improving endurance levels for sports and for muscular flexibility after strenuous workouts or with symptoms of fibromyalgia.  Additionally, D-ribose increases muscular strength for people with heart disease.

Dose: For fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and coronary artery disease, take 500 mg three times per day for optimum health.

S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe)

Pronounces samm-ee, SAMe is a compound that your body produces for various essential functions, including maintaining your immune system and accessing important brain chemicals like serotonin, melatonin, and dopamine.  If you suffer from vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency or methionine deficiency, than your SAMe levels are probably low.

SAMe is healthful for people suffering from fibromyalgia symptoms such as muscular pain, chronic fatigue, and depression, according to many studies, including this double-blind study on oral S-adenosylmethionine in primary fibromyalgia.

Dose: For fibromyalgia, vitamin B12 deficiency and chronic fatigue, take 800 mg per day for optimum health.

5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)

5-HTP is a chemical that your body produces from tryptophan, which is then converted into serotonin, which your brain uses throughout the day to transmit messages within the nervous system.

5-HTP is useful for promoting good health in people with chronic depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, obesity, migraine headaches, and chronic pain associated with fibromyalgia, as evidenced by this double-blind study.

Dose: For depression and fibromyalgia pain, take between 100 to 300 mg three times daily for optimum health.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant that destroys free radicals.  Vitamin E is recommended for heart health.  Other studies suggest that vitamin E supplementation might be helpful for people with restless legs syndrome, immune disorder, and chronic pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis, peripheral neuropathy, and fibromyalgia.

Dose: For fibromyalgia, take between 50 IU and 800 IU daily for optimum health.

Sources:

The effect of melatonin in patients with fibromyalgia: a pilot study.

Health benefits of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)- PubMed, NCBI

Oral S-adenosylmethionine in primary fibromyalgia. Double-blind clinical evaluation- PubMed, NCBI

Double-blind study of 5-hydroxytryptophan versus placebo in the treatment of primary fibromyalgia syndrome- PubMed, NCBI

Did you like this? Please share.

Can Vitamin B12 Help Pain and Numbness?

Can Vitamin B12 Help Pain and Numbness? Painful numbness and tingling in the hands and feet are classic symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency.

Vitamin B12 for pain, neuropathy

Can vitamin B12 help with pain?Absolutely.

Many people who suffer from constant “pins and needles” and muscle spasms don’t realize their vitamin B12 levels are plummeting- not until they start experiencing more alarming signs of severe vitamin B12 deficiency that could be prevented with early supplementation.

Vitamin B12 is one of the most important nutrients for your nervous system- it helps to maintain myelin, a fatty protective coating that surrounds your individual nerve synapses. With vitamin B12 deficiency, myelin slowly erodes, exposing your peripheral nervous system to damage and loss of nerve cells.

Nerve damage

Signs of nerve cell damage- peripheral neuropathy- include slower nervous reflexes, painful tinging in the extremities (fingers, hands, toes, feet, and tongue), muscle twitches, feet constantly “falling asleep,” muscle pain, difficulty walking straight, and increased “clumsiness” (dropping things).

Pain and numbness are just some of the initial symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency that affect your nervous system. Untreated, it can lead to demyelination, a symptom shared with multiple sclerosis (MS) and pernicious (vitamin B12) anemia, resulting in immobility and other extreme handicaps.

For that reason, it’s important to be able to recognize all the earliest signs of vitamin B12 deficiency and act on it.

Vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms

In addition to pain and numbness in the extremities, other signs of low vitamin B12 include:

  • Memory loss
  • Forgetfulness
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Poor concentration
  • Gait disturbances
  • Heart palpitations
  • Shallow breathing

Treatment

Most people find immediate relief when vitamin B12 levels are restored. The most effective method of supplementing with vitamin B12 is instant absorption into the bloodstream, as opposed to taking vitamin B12 tablets or pills.

Many over-the-counter sources of rapidly dissolving vitamin B12 are available as a gentle alternative to vitamin B12 injections.

Try this!

Help nerve pain AND supplement with extra vitamin B12, vitamin D, and other vital nutrients at the same time. Try these super-rich vitamin lotions. Easy to use, absorbent, and hypo-allergenic.

vitamin creams lineup

Choose one! Buy now.

Please tell us

Do you notice that your fingers and legs are constantly falling asleep, and then suffer from extreme pain as they “wake up?” Have you checked your vitamin B12 levels lately with a blood test?

Did you like this? Please share.
chili pepper cream for neuropathy pain

Capsaicin Cream for Nerve Pain

Capsaicin cream for nerve pain is naturally helpful, according to the leading studies on neuropathy treatments. Derived from hot chili peppers, topical capsaicin blocks nerve signals that cause pain and itching.

Capsaicin Cream eases nerve pain

Neuropathy is an illness that causes extreme soreness, imbalance and itching. It’s usually associated with diabetes, multiple sclerosis, pernicious anemia or alcoholism. Peripheral neuropathy is most common, causing uncomfortable numbness, cramps, and tingling in the hands and feet.

 What is capsaicin cream?

Capsaicin is a natural pain reliever derived from red chili peppers. As a topical cream, capsaicin offers relief for people suffering from neuropathy and arthritis.

How does it work?

Capsaicin relieves pain by blocking the skin’s pain receptors. People usually notice a slight burning or tingling sensation the first time they use capsaicin cream. That’s because the capsaicin diverts pain-transmitting chemicals produced by the nerve cells and releases it into your skin. As your nerve cells continue to absorb capsaicin, you will start producing fewer amounts of this pain-transmitting chemical, resulting in long-lasting overall relief. For this reason, experts such as Dr. Karen Lauze, a neurologist at Portsmouth Regional Hospital, recommend sticking with capsaicin cream for at least 6 weeks.

 “We have some success with capsaicin, a cream for the feet,” Lauze said. “The cream sucks out a specific protein in the pain fibers (protein C). Basically, it depletes the the fiber’s ability to feel pain…”1

Who benefits from capsaicin cream?

Capsaicin cream has many health benefits that provide relief for people suffering from multiple conditions. Examples include:

  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Diabetic neuropathy
  • Chronic pain disorders
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Post-surgery pain
  • Migraine
  • Cluster headache
  • Shingles
  • Joint pain
  • Arthritis
  • Psoriasis
  • Mouth sores

 

How do I use the capsaicin cream for nerve pain?

To use, simple rub a small amount of capsaicin cream wherever you experience pain or itching. Apply at least 4 times per day for optimal results. Don’t use on broken skin or inflammation. Avoid touching your eyes or nose until after you have washed your hands. Initial burning or stinging will decrease with prolonged use.

 

Studies proving efficacy of capsaicin cream

Oxford University has published several studies focusing on capsaicin cream for peripheral neuropathy. Participants included patients of AIDS, arthritis, shingles, diabetes, and cancer. Forty-one percent of patients favored capsaicin cream for pain relief, compared to placebos and capsaicin patches that were not helpful.

 “High-concentration topical capsaicin used to treat postherpetic neuralgia and HIV-neuropathy generates more participants with high levels of pain relief than does control treatment using a much lower concentration of capsaicin.”2

 

 “In conclusion, patients severely affected by fibromyalgia can obtain short-term improvements following topical capsaicin 0.075% treatment three times daily for 6 weeks.”3

 

In a separate study focusing on fibromyalgia patients, scientists noted significant results in participants who treated tender pain spots with capsaicin cream.

 “In neuropathic conditions with six trials (656 patients), topical capsaicin (0.075%) was better than placebo with an NNT of 5.7 (95% CI 4.0 to 10)”4

Takeaway

Doctors agree that using natural pain relief is the best way to decrease your dependence on unhealthy pain medications. Many vitamins, herbs, and plant-based treatments can effectively nourish your nerve cells from within.

Nervex contains capsaicin from chili peppers, Andrographis Paniculata Extract (ParActin®), Thiotic Acid (r-ALA), and vitamins B12, D, and E.

Buy Nervex neuropathy cream now

Try Nervex Neuropathy Pain Relieving Cream now.

 

Sources:

1Pain of neuropathy is sometimes treatable

2Topical capsaicin (high concentration) for chronic neuropathic pain in adults.

3Short-term efficacy of topical capsaicin therapy in severely affected fibromyalgia patients

4Topical capsaicin for chronic pain

 

 

Did you like this? Please share.

7 Tips for Relieving Joint Pain in the Knees

Joint pain in the knees, ankles, hips, or shoulders can indicate arthritis, damage to the cartilage that rests between your bones, making it hard to bend, twist, or kneel without suffering from immense pain. To relieve joint pain, it’s important to learn how to treat the inflamed areas at home, while also visiting your doctor to rule out serious injuries that may require surgery.

joint pain in the knees

What causes joint pain in the knees?

Often, arthritic joint pain occurs in the knee when the soft cartilage of the knee cap becomes weak and fragile. Pieces of cartilage may become lodged into your joint area, causing severe aches and dull pain all around your knee area.

Joint pain in the knees can occur because of a sports injury, poor posture, or occupations that require standing or sitting in one position for long hours.

Symptoms include a constant ache in the front of the knees, limited movement and buckling.

What are the best treatments for joint pain?

First, see a doctor. You may need to take some x-rays. If there is extensive damage, then your doctor may suggest surgery.

The most important treatments are the ones that you can do at home to reduce swelling, alleviate pain, prevent further damage to the knee and begin the healing process.

1) Apply ice.

The moment you notice the beginnings of pain in your joints, sit down, put your feet up, and put an ice pack on the inflamed area. This will reduce swelling and cut down on most of the pain.

2) Rub on pain relief cream.

Use a safe, gentle non-irritating pain relief lotion that contains natural  ingredients that soothe the muscles surrounding the joint and produce a cooling effect.

3) Use over-the-counter medications.

Pain relievers (such as acetaminophen) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (such as ibuprofen) can go a long way towards relieving joint pain and swelling in the knees.

4) Build up the muscle.

Visit a physical therapist to get a schedule of muscle-strengthening exercises that will help to speed up recovery and prevent further knee injuries.

5) Protect the swollen joints.

It may help to wear a brace or tight-fitting sock around your kneecap to sustain good alignment.

6) Take it easy.

If you’re used to exercising regularly, then this is a good time to take a small break. Until you’re feeling much better, avoid bending down to pick something up or sitting down on the floor.

7) Wear proper footwear.

Poor posture can cause joint pain in the knees, even if you don’t realize it. Cheap shoes that don’t cradle the foot properly can cause body aches and pains in the feet, legs, hips, and even the shoulders and back. Many people don’t realize the damage they’ve been doing to their spine until they finally sample orthotic inserts paired with good sturdy shoes that provide ankle support. And then, comes the relief…

joint pain in the knees lotion

Discover the healing effect of Joint Right Pain Relief Cream.

Get it for $19.95

Do you have any other great tips for relieving joint pain in the knees, or elsewhere in the body? Please feel free to comment below.

Image by Praisaeng

Did you like this? Please share.

Vitamin B12- Essential for Chronic Pain Management

According to chronic pain management experts, painful joints and muscle soreness could mean vitamin B12 deficiency. When vitamin B12 levels are down, symptoms similar to fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis become more common… and debilitating. Listed are some typical chronic pain symptoms that occur with vitamin B12 deficiency.

Muscle numbness, tingling, and spasms

If you get painful “pins and needles” sensations whenever you sit down, then you may need to up your vitamin B12 intake. Vitamin B12 is  important for healthy nerve cell.  When  vitamin B12 levels suffer, so does your nervous system.

Peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage) happens with vitamin B12 deficiency anemia (pernicious anemia) and multiple sclerosis (MS). That’s because both conditions involve destruction of myelin, a fatty layer that protects your nerve cells.

Symptoms include painful tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, burning sore tongue, and muscle twitches.

Slower reflexes

Another sign of vitamin B12 deficiency from nerve damage is slow nerve reflexes. You may have difficulty walking in a straight line, controlling arm movements, or sitting up straight.

Pain and feebleness

Sore muscles, weak joints, and constant fatigue are symptoms associated with vitamin B12 deficiency , and they worsen chronic pain for people diagnosed with fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, lupus, or other autoimmune disorders.

Vitamin B12 deficiency causes low oxygen from poor red blood cell production, which in turn causes crushing fatigue, dizziness, and muscle pain.

Comorbid pain conditions

Many people with chronic pain also suffer from vitamin B12 deficiency. This makes it difficult to  diagnose and treat low B12, as people (and sometimes doctors) assume that all pain symptoms are part of their chronic condition, when, really, they are suffering from a combination of chronic pain and comorbid vitamin B12 anemia.

Chronic pain illnesses that are often comorbid with vitamin B12 deficiency include:

  • Fibromyalgia
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Migraines
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Lupus
  • Complex regional pain syndrome

To find out if chronic pain is related to low vitamin B12, try taking large doses of highly-digestible vitamin B12 supplements. Many pain patients are surprised to find out that much of their suffering can be reduced just by replenishing vitamin B12 in their blood supply.

More signs of low B12

In addition to chronic pain and fatigue, other signs of vitamin B12 deficiency include:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Memory problems
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Brain fog
  • Dizziness, vertigo
  • Tinnitus (ear ringing)
  • Heart palpitations

Chronic pain management

Vitamin B12 should be a regular part of your chronic pain management, especially if you’re a risk factor for autoimmune disorders- a common cause of pernicious anemia.

Vitamin B12 Patch for chronic pain management

Order the Vitamin B12 Patch and save money- Now just $19.95

Maxasorb Vitamin B12 Cream for chronic pain management

Boost B12 with Maxasorb Vitamin B12 Cream

Nervex Chronic Pain Management Cream

Get Nervex pain cream, the ultimate in chronic pain mangement

Did you like this? Please share.