Category Archives: alternative medicine

Less fried foods for lower heart disease and stroke risk

fried food, fried, unhealthy, heart attack, strokeAs you walk along the street during any summer carnival, it’s no doubt you’ll take in the sweet smell of cotton candy and the fragrance of fried foods like funnel cakes and fries. These fried foods can hold so many memories for many of us spending time with family and friends. Not to mention that such treats can taste delicious. However, recent studies show that the more you eat fried foods, the higher your heart disease and stroke risk.

Heart disease and stroke facts

Besides being one of the leading causes of death in the United States, diseases of the heart come in many forms. However, it’s cardiovascular disease or conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that are most dangerous. Such conditions include heart attack, angina (chest pain), or stroke.

Stroke is also in the top five leading causes of death in the United States and is also related to a vessel condition. It occurs when blood flow in the artery that supplies blood to the brain is blocked. Less commonly, a stroke can occur when this artery leaks or ruptures.

Fried foods and heart disease

Fried foods can taste good and can be purchased at a lower cost than healthier convenience food options. However, the long-term cost of eating such foods can be high. This is because eating such foods on a regular basis can place your heart health at risk.

Foods that are fried contain high amounts of saturated and sometimes trans fats. Research shows that when such fats in the diet are replaced with unsaturated fats, heart disease risk is reduced.

In fact, a recent study looked at the effect of fried food intake on heart disease and stroke risk. Study results show that those people who ate fried foods one to three times a week had a 7% higher risk of heart attack and stroke compared to those who ate fried foods less than once a week. Also, those people who ate fried foods daily had a 14% higher risk of such conditions.

Other ways you can lower heart disease and stroke risk 

Besides reducing fried food intake, there are other things you can do to lower your heart disease and stroke risk. Use the following tips to help your heart be at its healthiest.

  • Eat more fruits and vegetables: Consuming a colorful array of fruits and vegetables can help provide antioxidants to the body. Each color of the rainbow of produce contains different antioxidants that can provide varying health benefits to the body. Overall, having plenty of antioxidants in the diet can reduce inflammation in the body and lower risk of chronic diseases like heart disease.
  • Sleep enough each night: Research shows that poor sleeping patterns can increase risk of heart disease and stroke. The National Sleep Foundation recommends that most adults sleep seven to nine hours each night. If you find you’re having trouble sleeping, it may be helpful to visit your doctor for treatment. They could recommend a sleep study to help identify any health issues that could be disturbing your sleep.
  • Manage stress: Too much stress can have an impact on your heart health. Therefore, be sure to manage your stress with some relaxation breathing, meditation, yoga, or talking to a counselor each week.
  • Visit your doctor regularly: It’s important to visit your doctor at least once a year to check your numbers. Your numbers include cholesterol, triglycerides, blood glucose levels, blood pressure, and body weight. These numbers can help identify any heart health risk factors you may have. The earlier you find such risk factors, the earlier you can receive treatment and prevent your risk of stroke.
  • Take supplements when necessary: If you are lacking certain vitamins or minerals in your diet, you may need a supplement such as a multivitamin or fish oil. Supplements could help your body receive the antioxidants you need to fight oxidative stress and lower chronic disease risk factors. One such supplement is Circova by Vita SciencesCircova contains ingredients like L-arginine, niacin, and hawthorne to help promote improved blood flow and blood pressure.

-written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

References:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (May 3, 2018) “About Stroke.”

Gordon, S. (July 11, 2019) “More evidence fried food ups heart disease, stroke risk.”

Houston, M. (February 2018) “The relationship of saturated fats and coronary heart disease: fa(c)t or fiction? A commentary.” Ther Adv Cardiovasc Dis., 12(2):33-37.

Koo, D. L., Nam, H., Thomas, R. J., & Yun, C. H. (2018). Sleep Disturbances as a Risk Factor for Stroke. Journal of stroke20(1), 12-32.

Mayo Clinic (March 22, 2018) “Heart Disease.”

Medline Plus (last reviewed December 26, 2017) “Antioxidants.”

National Sleep Foundation (accessed October 30, 2018) “National Sleep Foundation Recommends New Sleep Times.”


  • Ramp up your exercise routine to reduce anxiety

    walk, walking, health, exercise, fitnessAlthough many of us may feel anxious from time to time, this anxiety may resolve after a hot bath or cup of tea. However, for a portion of the population, this feeling continues to affect them daily. It can impact daily life in a way that interrupts daily living such as work, sleep, and relationships. Therefore, for those with anxiety disorder, treatment options are necessary. Besides prescription medications, recent research shows that increasing intensity of exercise may help reduce symptoms of anxiety disorder.

    What is anxiety?

    About one out of every five people in the United States suffer from anxiety disorder. Those with this disorder are not just feeling anxious before a big event, but feel anxious most of their life. For example, these people feel an excessive amount of dread that is persistent and uncontrollable.

    Anxiety disorder can come in many forms such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Those with OCD may feel like if they do not perform certain, often repetitive tasks that something bad will happen. Other forms of anxiety disorder include generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic attack disorder, and phobias.

    General symptoms

    If you experience the following symptoms as well as excessive worry for at least six months, then you may have GAD. If you feel this may be you, be sure to see a qualified healthcare provider for treatment options.

    • feeling nervous or on edge
    • having a sense of impending danger
    • increased heart rate
    • rapid breathing rate
    • difficulty concentrating
    • trouble sleeping
    • digestive issues
    • weakness or fatigue

    How is anxiety treated?

    Anxiety treatment usually involves prescription medicines, especially for those with moderate to severe forms. Also, therapy can help with symptoms, whether you take medicine or not, to help teach you ways to manage symptoms. A common form of therapy used is called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). CBT teaches people how to think, behave, and react differently to those situations in life that produce the most anxiety for them.

    How can exercise help anxiety?

    Research shows that exercise can be a great supplemental treatment for anxiety. This is because studies show that exercise can, in the long-term, reduce inflammation in the body. In turn, a person can not only lower risk of inflammatory conditions like heart disease and diabetes, but also anxiety and depression.

    In fact, research shows that exercise, especially moderate to high intensity exercise, can lower pro-inflammatory markers in the body. Another 2018 study looked at exercise impact in those with panic disorder. Study results show that although exercise increased stress right after performing it, it lowers depression and anxiety scores over the long-term.

    About exercise intensity

    To reap the mental health rewards of exercise, intensity matters. Studies show that moderate to high intensity is best for reducing mental health symptoms. According to the Mayo Clinic, moderate intensity exercise occurs when:

    • your breath quickens, but you’re not out of breath
    • a light sweat develops after about 10 minutes
    • you can talk while moving, but cannot sing

    On the other hand, high intensity exercise will produce deeper and more rapid breaths and you will start sweating in a few minutes. For optimal health of mind and body, most adults should move at a moderate intensity at least 150 minutes a week, or at least 30 minutes for 5 days a week. Or, if you prefer higher intensity exercise, move at this intensity at least 75 minutes a week, or at least 15 minutes a day for 5 days a week.

    Other natural treatments

    Besides exercise, there are other natural treatments that can help reduce inflammation in the body. Eating more fruits and vegetables each day can provide anti-inflammatory antioxidants that can help. Also, you could take a natural supplement daily such as Sereneo by Vita Sciences. Sereneo contains ingredients like magnesium, chamomile, and valerian to help promote higher levels of the “feel good hormone” serotonin in the body. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

    Take home message

    If you suffer from anxiety, then you may be desperate for treatment that will improve your quality of life. Along with medicines and therapy, exercise can be an effective adjunct treatment. Not only that, but exercise can also improve your physical health as well. So, start moving a little more each day to help both your body and mind be in its best health.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    References

    Anxiety and Depression Association of America (accessed July 8, 2019) “Understand the Facts.”

    Anxiety and Depression Association of America (accessed July 8, 2019) “Symptoms.”

    Aylett, E., Small, N., and Bower, P. (July 2018) “Exercise in the treatment of clinical anxiety in general practice – a systematic review and meta-analysis.” BMC Health Serv Res., 18(1):559.

    Lattari, E., et al. (February 2018) “Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Anxiety Symptoms and Cortical Activity in Patients with Panic Disorder: A Pilot Study.” Clin Pract Epidemiol Ment Health,14:11-25.

    Mayo Clinic (May 15, 2019) “Exercise intensity: how to measure it.”

    National Institute of Mental Health (July 2018) “Anxiety Disorders.”

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (last reviewed on February 1, 2019) “Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.”


  • A plant-based diet may help those with Crohn’s disease

    Have you ever been told to eat your veggies? Many of us have been told as children that vegetables and other plant-based foods would help us grow strong. And as adults, you may have been told that eating more vegetables will help you manage your weight. But recent studies show that plant-based foods may also be good for your gut health, especially for those with Crohn’s disease.

    What is Crohn’s disease?

    Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can greatly impact quality of life. Those with the condition have symptoms like abdominal pain, severe diarrhea, weight loss, malnutrition, and fatigue. Also, people with severe forms of the disease can also have inflammation in their skin, eyes, joints, and liver too.

    If you think you may have Crohn’s disease, there are certain tests that can help diagnose it. Such tests include a colonoscopy, a CT scan, an MRI scan, or certain blood tests like a fecal occult blood test. Once diagnosed, you can treat this condition with anti-inflammatory medicines, immune system suppressors, or antibiotics. Other medicines people may use to relieve symptoms of Crohn’s include:

    • anti-diarrheals
    • pain relievers
    • iron supplements
    • vitamin B-12 shots
    • calcium and vitamin D supplements

    People with Crohn’s disease may need some vitamin supplements since the disease can sometimes cause deficiencies. For example, the disease can cause B-12 deficiency in some or may cause anemia due to blood loss from blood in the stool. Also, those with the disease  may be at higher risk for the bone weakening condition osteoporosis which can make calcium and vitamin D supplements necessary to help strengthen bones.

    Why is a plant-based diet good for you?

    A diet rich in plant-based foods are healthy for you for many reasons. Plant-based foods like fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds contain not only fiber, but also antioxidants. Antioxidants help reduce inflammation in the body, and therefore can help reduce risk of inflammatory diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and digestive conditions like IBD.

    In fact, research shows that a plant-based diet can improve weight, blood glucose levels, as well as mental health. In turn, such a diet can help increase quality of life of those with diabetes. Therefore, adding in at least 1.5 cups of fruit and 2 cups of vegetables a day into your daily regimen can help enhance your health for many years to come in many ways.

    Plant-based diet and Crohn’s disease research

    A recent case study shows promise that a plant-based diet may help those with Crohn’s reduce symptoms. One man with Crohn’s disease started a plant-based diet with no animal-based products or highly processed foods after treatment for his disease was not fully working. Although he received IV infusions of medication every two months for a year to help his symptoms, he still had not achieved remission of his symptoms. He still suffered with abdominal pain, bloating, and fatigue.

    So, during his second year of using medication, he started a plant-based diet. After six months of sticking to this diet and exercising, a colonoscopy revealed “complete mucosal healing with no visible evidence of Crohn’s disease.” Now researchers are not sure if this type of diet would help everyone with the condition, but it does provide experts with the drive to do more research into this type of diet for those with the condition.

    Other ways you can improve gut health

    Besides eating a plant-based diet, there are other ways you can help your gut health including the following:

    • Eat more fermented foods: Foods like yogurt, sauerkraut, kimchi, or drinking kombucha contain healthy bacteria. Therefore, they can provide the body with good bacteria that can help increase diversity in the gut, and in turn reduce inflammation.
    • Take a probiotic supplement daily. A probiotic supplement is another way to get more healthy bacteria into your gut. Be sure to take one daily that contains a diverse array of strains and at least 1 billion colony-forming units (CFUs) like Biovia30 by Vita Sciences. Biovia30 contains 10 probiotic strains with a total of 30 billion CFUs per serving to help promote digestive health.
    • Manage stress: Whether you use yoga, meditation, or talk therapy to help you manage stress, be sure to do something to help you stay calm. This is because stressors, even those like a lack of sleep, can disrupt the bacteria in the gut.
    • Exercise often: Research shows that those who exercise most days of the week have a greater diversity of gut bacteria than those who don’t. So, try to be active as often as you can to help your gut health.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD, LDN

    References:

    Centers for Disease Control (November 16, 2017) “Only 1 in 10 Adults Get Enough Fruits or Vegetables.”

    Leonard, J. (May 28, 2019) “10 ways to improve gut health.” Medical News Today.

    Mayo Clinic (June 26, 2019) “Crohn’s disease.”

    Paddock, Ph.D., C. (June 27, 2019) “Could a plant-based diet be the answer to Crohn’s disease?” Medical News Today. 

    Toumpanakis, A., Turnbull, T., and Alba-Barba, I. (October 2018) “Effectiveness of plant-based diets in promoting well-being in the management of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review.” BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care., 6(1):e000534.

     

     


  • Managing work hours could lower stroke risk

    brain, health, stroke. headache, inflammationRecent statistics show that stroke is the number five cause of death and disability in the United States. This is why it’s so important to look into what factors may increase risk of this condition and work to reduce them. For example, a recent study shows that working long hours may increase one’s risk for stroke. Although this may not always be a factor that you can prevent, let’s learn more about this condition and ways you can lower your risk.

    What is stroke?

    In technical terms, a stroke occurs when there is a clot blocking a blood vessel to the brain or when that blood vessel bursts. Since such blood vessels carry oxygen and nutrients to the brain, this type of issue can cause brain cells to die. In turn, this can lead to a variety of health issues including brain health issues or even death.

    Causes of stroke

    As mentioned before, there are two major causes of stroke. The most common cause  occurs when arteries to the brain become narrow or blocked. This is called an ischemic stroke. About 80-percent of strokes are ischemic strokes.

    The other cause is when a blood vessel in the brain leaks or ruptures. This type of stroke is called a hemorrhagic type. Hemorrhagic strokes can be caused by factors such as high blood pressure, overtreatment with blood thinners, or aneurysms. Aneurysms occur when there are weak spots in the blood vessel walls.

    Warning signs

    Although you may not be able to prevent all strokes, you may be able to see warning signs. When you notice such signs, you can contact emergency medical services right away to receive treatment. Such warning signs include:

    • trouble with speaking such as slurred speech
    • issues with understanding speech
    • paralysis or numbness of face, arm, or leg
    • vision issues in one or both eyes
    • a sudden, severe headache
    • sudden dizziness, loss of balance, or loss of coordination

    If you notice any of these symptoms in someone, then it’s important to think fast. This is because after the onset of symptoms, brain health issues can quickly escalate. Therefore, as soon as you notice symptoms, be sure to use the acronym FAST, or:

    • Face: Ask the person to smile. If one side of their face starts to droop, then it may be a sign of a brain health issue.
    • Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. If one arm starts to drift downward, or if they are unable to raise their arm, then there may be a brain health issue.
    • Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase like “How are you?” Listen closely for any slurred speech that may indicate a brain health issue.
    • Time: It’s important not to waste any time if you notice any of these symptoms, since it doesn’t take long for brain health issues to escalate from time of symptom onset.

    Work hours and stroke research

    A recent French study looked at the effect of work hours on stroke risk. It was found that those people who worked more than ten hours on at least fifty days per year were at higher risk for this brain health condition. Those working such long hours had a 29-percent high risk, while those who worked like this for ten years or more had a 45-percent higher risk.

    How to lower risk of a stroke

    Besides reducing work hours, there are plenty of other things you can do to lower your risk of a stroke.  Several of these things include taking steps to live healthier such as:

    • Exercising more to help improve heart health and vessel health as well as to help manage weight.
    • Losing weight to help reduce the stress placed on the heart and blood vessels.
    • Stop smoking to help lower risk of high blood pressure.
    • Eat a healthier diet such as reducing intake of processed, sugary, calorie-laden foods and eating more fruits and vegetables. A healthier diet can help reduce cholesterol, lower blood pressure risk, help you manage weight, and reduce risk of diabetes, to name a few.
    • Add a blood vessel health supplement to your daily regimen such as Circova by Vita Sciences. Circova contains ingredients like L-arginine and niacin that can help to naturally improve blood flow and blood pressure.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    American Stroke Association (accessed June 25, 2019) “About Stroke.”

    BBC Health (June 20, 2019) “Long working hours ‘linked to stroke risk.'”

    Mayo Clinic (last reviewed June 11, 2019) “Stroke.”

    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (last modified January 31, 2019) “Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke.”


  • Diet and Exercise for Diabetes Prevention

    healthy, diet, diabetes, healthIf you have been told you are at risk for diabetes, then I’m sure you’ve been told to diet and exercise. This advice is nothing new to help lower your risk. However, new research confirms a method of diet and exercise that can prevent those with prediabetes from developing diabetes. Read below for more on this research and learn how you can lower your risk of this chronic condition today.

    What is prediabetes?

    Prediabetes occurs when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to meet type 2 diabetes criteria. According to the Centers for Disease Control, about one in three American adults have diabetes. And surprisingly, about 90-percent don’t even know that they have it. That is why it’s so important for everyone to have their numbers checked every year.

    These numbers include not only fasting blood glucose levels, but also cholesterol, trigycerides, blood pressure, and HgA1C. HgA1C tells you the average blood glucose levels in your body over the previous three months. Those with a HgA1C level below 5.7 are in the healthy range. However, those with a level between 5.7 and 6.4 are in the prediabetes range.  And if this level tests 6.5 or above two times in a row, then a person is given a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.

    Prediabetes research

    A recent study looked at the effect of diet and exercise on the changeover from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes. The study looked at 962 patients with prediabetes and followed them for about three years.

    All patients were first placed on a 800-calorie diet with a meal replacement for two months. Then, patients were either placed on a high protein and low glycemic diet or a moderate protein and moderate glycemic diet. Patients were also asked to either engage in vigorous intensity exercise for 75 minutes a week or moderate intensity for 150 minutes a week.

    Study results show that only 62 of the 962 patients enrolled in this study progressed from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes.  Both diet programs tested showed reduced risk of the condition. Therefore, researchers suggest that a period of meal replacement-induced weight loss followed by three years of weight maintenance is an effective strategy for preventing prediabetes progression to type 2 diabetes. So, just eat a balanced diet of lean proteins and plant-based foods and stay as active as possible to lower your risk.

    Other ways you can lower your risk of diabetes

    Besides diet and exercise, use the following tips to improve your health and lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Just small changes made each week can over time lower your risk in a big way.

    • Manage stress through therapy, exercise, support groups, relaxation breathing, meditation, or yoga. Research shows that those who experience more perceived stress are more likely to be at risk for getting type 2 diabetes.
    • Be sure to sleep at least seven hours each night if possible to help your body regulate blood glucose levels better. According to the Joslin Diabetes Center, those who do not sleep enough each night are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes. Not to mention that these people are also at higher risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke. So, be sure to reduce screen time before bed time and avoid eating less than two hours before bed time. These tips are just some ways you can improve bed time and avoid interrupted sleep.
    • Consume more fiber in your diet through whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. This will not only help you to improve gut health but can aid in weight management.
    • Take a daily supplement such as Glucarex by Vitasciences. Glucarex contains natural ingredients like chromium, vanadium, alpha lipoic acid, and cinnamon. This supplement formula supports healthy weight, metabolism, and blood glucose levels.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (last reviewed May 30, 2019) “Prediabetes: Your Chance to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes.”

    Healio Primary Care (June 11, 2019) “Weight loss, behavior change prevents changeover from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes.”

    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (April 2018) “The A1C Test & Diabetes.”


  • June is Alzheimer’s Brain Awareness Month

    brain, health, alzheimer's, cognitiveWith so much focus on diet and exercise helping the heart, brain health may take a back seat in the wellness arena. However, the brain is the control center of the body, and in turn must not be neglected. During the month of June, it’s especially important to be aware of the brain disease known as Alzheimer’s. You may have heard of it before, but may not know what it entails. Let’s learn more about this disease and how you can be an advocate for this devastating brain health condition.

    Alzheimer’s basics

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive and irreversible brain health condition that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills. Although some memory loss may be a normal part of aging, the severity of symptoms in Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging. More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from this type of dementia. And along with this number, there are countless other people, including loved ones and caregivers, that have to live everyday watching those they care about suffer from this disease.

    Causes of Alzheimer’s include plaques and tangles in the brain. These plaques form from abnormal deposits of protein in the brain. Also, the damage caused by these deposits typically start in the hippocampus and entorhinal complex of the brain. And its these parts of the brain that are vital in forming memories. Over time, more neurons die and other parts of the brain begin to shrink.

    It is not fully understood why certain people may be more at risk for this disease. However, it’s thought that less than 1-percent is from genetic changes, while for most people it is likely a combination of genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors.

    Early symptoms of Alzheimer’s 

    The early symptoms of this disease may be things as simple as forgetting recent events or conversations. These memory problems are one of the first signs of Alzheimer’s disease. However, other red flags of the disease may include:

    • repeating statements over and over again
    • forgetting appointments and events and not remembering them later
    • frequently losing things
    • getting lost in familiar places
    • forgetting the names of family members and everyday objects
    • having trouble thinking of words to describe common objects or hold a simple conversation

    If you, your family member ,or someone you know exhibits any of these symptoms, it may be time to visit the doctor. This is because a complete physical exam, detailed neurological exam, and mental status exam can help diagnose Alzheimer’s or whatever other condition may be causing symptoms.

    Later symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease

    In the later stages of the disease, you may start to see some of the following symptoms:

    • inability to learn new things
    • trouble with simple activities of daily living like bathing, dressing, and eating.
    • Hallucinations
    • Paranoia
    • Impulsive behavior

    Alzheimer’s research

    Recent research shows that there are currently not many treatments for AD. One medicine is a cholinesterase inhibitor. This medicine is for those with mild, moderate, or severe AD.  This medicine is also give to those with Parkinson’s dementia. Memantine is another medicine that is approved in use for those with moderate and severe AD who show difficulty in attention and alertness.

    Besides such treatments, research shows an independent link between vitamin D deficiency and AD. Therefore, those with symptoms should have their vitamin D levels tested for this vitamin.

    Another nutrition-related link with AD has to do with omega-3 fatty acids. This is because research shows the heart health of individuals correlates with brain health. In fact, recent reviews show that those who eat a heart healthy diet based on the Mediterranean diet have a lower risk of cognitive decline compared to those on other eating regimens.

    Future research

    Future research of Alzheimer’s has to do with targeting the plaques and tangles in the brain. However, researchers cannot yet seem to agree on what abnormality has the most impact on cognitive decline. That is why it’s important now to support research efforts that will help find more effective treatment for this terrifying condition.

    How you can support research

    Be sure to visit the Alzheimer’s Association website for more ideas on ways you can help support Alzheimer’s research. Also, hashtag #endalz in your social media posts this month to show your support in Alzheimer’s disease awareness.

    How you can keep your brain healthy

    As mentioned before, some research is showing that lifestyle changes like diet may help brain health. Read below for specific things you can do to help keep your brain healthy.

    • Exercise your brain with puzzles and word games: This is thought to keep building connections between nerve cells and may even help generate new brain cells.
    • Exercise your body: Walking, jogging, swimming, and dancing, to name a few can help keep your heart and brain strong. Not only can it help create new nerve cell connections, but can improve blood pressure and cholesterol that can also help brain health.
    • Improve your numbers: Help keep your blood glucose, cholesterol, and blood pressure in healthy ranges by eating healthier. This means more plant-based foods in the diet like fruits, vegetables, and healthy fats. Healthy fats can include olive oil, avocado, nuts, seeds, and olives, to name a few.
    • Avoid tobacco and limit alcohol: Smoking can constrict blood vessels and increase heart health risk, while excessive alcohol intake is a major risk factor for dementia. Therefore visit your healthcare provider or websites like SAMHSA.gov to help you quit smoking and abusing alcohol.
    • Reduce stress and increase social support:  Those with a lower risk of dementia also have strong social ties. Also, people who are anxious or with depression tend to score lower on cognitive function tests. Therefore, be sure to keep a support system around you of friends, neighbors, loved ones, and healthcare providers to keep your brain healthy.
    • Take a daily supplement:  Vitamin deficiencies like vitamin D are often seen in those with cognitive health issues. Also, omega-3 fatty acids may help improve brain health. Therefore, if you don’t eat enough healthy fats and vitamins in your diet it may be time to add a dietary supplement to your daily routine. The fish oil supplement produced by Vita Sciences can be a great addition to your healthy lifestyle routine.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    Harvard Health Publishing: Harvard Medical School (updated January 16, 2018) “12 ways to keep your brain young.”

    Kumar, A. and Tsao, J.W. (last updated December 18, 2018) “Alzheimer disease.” StatPearls

    Mayo Clinic (December 8, 2018) “Alzheimer’s disease.”

    National Institute on Aging (accessed June 12, 2019) “Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.”

    Weller, J and Budson, A. (July 2018) “Current understanding of Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis and treatment.”  F1000Res., 7:F1000 Faculty Rev-1161.

     

     

     


  • How to help your headaches- Headache Awareness Month 2019

    brain, headache, health, migraineTraffic, rude neighbors or co-workers, and financial stress are some the of common things in life that can cause stress. In turn, this stress can give you a headache. Besides literally being a pain, chronic headaches can reduce quality of life and lead to other health issues over time. In honor of June, which is Headache Awareness Month, let’s learn more about headaches and how you can manage them naturally.

    All about headaches

    When it comes to headaches, not all of them are created equal. This is because some can be worse than others, they can affect different sides of the head, and some last longer than others. The two major types of headaches are tension headaches and migraines.

    First of all, the most common type of headache is the tension headache. Tension headaches may stem from mental stress, or tension, as well as too little sleep, too much alcohol, or a mental health condition like anxiety or depression. And according to experts, tension headaches usually occur as a result of tight muscles in the shoulder, neck, scalp, and jaw.

    The second major type of headache is the migraine. And unlike tension headaches, migraines involve a whole different level of pain. This is because migraines cause more than just a head ache. In fact, other symptoms of a migraine can include:

    • moderate to severe throbbing often on one side of the head
    • sensitivity to light and sound
    • nausea
    • vision changes such as flashing lights or temporary loss of vision

    Headache management 

    Typical treatment of a headache may involve an over the counter pain reliever. However, if you deal with headaches often, you may want to find more natural ways to deal with your condition to avoid taking so much medicine. Some natural ways of dealing with headaches include:

    Acupuncture: This age-old technique of inserting thin needles in certain areas of the skin has been shown to help reduce headaches if the active points are targeted. Therefore, it’s important to ensure that you visit an acupuncturist who has experience and training in treating headaches to ensure you receive the most effective treatment.

    Massage: Through manipulation of soft tissues of the body, research shows that massage can help relieve tension-type headaches.

    Spinal manipulation: Healthcare providers like chiropractors can provide spinal manipulation treatment. This type of treatment involves applying a controlled force to a joint in the spine. By doing this, research shows that this type of treatment may help reduce the pain and intensity of migraine headaches. However, it’s important to note that such manipulation may cause side effects. Such side effects may include temporary headaches, tiredness, or discomfort in the area that was worked on. Therefore, be sure to talk with your doctor before opting for this headache treatment.

    Breathing exercises: Although there have been limited studies done, one study does show that breathing exercises, such as those involved with yoga, can help lessen headache intensity and frequency. Therefore, it may do your body and mind good to add yoga to your weekly routine. Other breathing-related exercises that may help include meditation, relaxation breathing, or tai chi.

    Losing weight or diet changes: Experts suggest that you can manage headaches by losing weight or taking a magnesium supplement daily. Also, adding magnesium-rich foods to your diet could help with headache treatment. Such foods include spinach, quinoa, nuts like almonds, cashews, and peanuts, as well as black beans, avocado, and tofu, to name a few.

    Certain dietary supplements: According to the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society, the supplement butterbur is effective in reducing the severity and frequency of migraine attacks. It’s important to note though that the effects of long-term use of this supplement are not known. Also, it’s thought that extended use could harm the liver. Therefore, be sure to have other options in your headache treatment routine and ask your doctor before starting this supplement.

    Instead of this supplement then, it may be worth it to try a more natural and safe supplement such as Migravent by Vita Sciences. Migravent contains natural ingredients like specialized PA free butterbur, CoQ10, magnesium, and riboflavin for advanced neurological support. PA free butterbur means that you receive the migraine health benefits of butterbur without the pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) that are unhealthy for your liver.

    Take home message

    Headaches can literally be a pain in the neck. Therefore, it’s always good to have an array of remedies up your sleeve. This way you can deal with them effectively when you need to. For ways you can help support research on headache treatment as well as for resources and events to advocate for those who suffer from such health issues, be sure to visit the American Headache Society website today.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    American Headache Society (accessed June 4, 2019) “How to Participate in Migraine and Headache Awareness Month.”

    Goldman, R. (last updated July 26, 2017) “Ten foods high in magnesium.” Medical News Today.

    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (last modified May 16, 2019) “Headaches: In Depth.”

     

     


  • Exercise more to decrease risk of diabetes-related depression

    yoga, exercise, health, mental health, depressionWhen you receive a diabetes diagnosis, it can be a life-changing time. This is because diabetes treatment can involve a change in diet, new medications, and checking blood glucose levels at home. Not to mention, that is can be scary to know that you have a condition that will be with you for life. It can be overwhelming and for some can cause depression. Fortunately, a recent study shows that adding exercise to your daily routine may help those with diabetes-related depression improve quality of life in body and mind.

    What is depression?

    Depression is a condition in which a person feels some of the symptoms listed below for a period of two weeks or more. These symptoms negatively impact quality of life at work, home, and in relationships. Such symptoms include:

    • Feeling sad
    • Loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed
    • Changes in appetite with weight loss or gain unrelated to dieting
    • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
    • Loss of energy or increased fatigue
    • Slowed movements and speech (actions observable by others)
    • Feeling worthless or guilty
    • Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions
    • Thoughts of death or suicide

    Depression is typically treated with medications and psychotherapy. Also, in severe cases, electroconvulsive therapy may be used. However, recent studies show that exercise may be helpful in decreasing symptoms of depression, especially in cases of diabetes-related depression.

    Exercise and diabetes-related depression

    Experts report that those people with diabetes are twice as likely to develop depression as those without the condition. Therefore, this group of people is of major interest to researchers. In fact, a recent study looked at the impact of various treatments on those with diabetes and depression. Over 12 weeks, 140 people received either cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), exercise, or a combo of both treatments. Those receiving exercise treatment were encouraged to stay active with moderate exercise for 150 minutes a week.

    Study results show that those in the exercise group had the highest odds of major depressive disorder depression than those not receiving this treatment. Also, those who received the combo treatment of exercise and CBT had a twice as likely chance to go into remission from their depression. Although this study shows promise that exercise is helpful for depressive symptoms, you should not stop your usual care plan. Use exercise only as a part of your treatment plan and not the entire treatment plan.

    About moderate exercise

    In order to reap the benefits of exercise, it’s important to stay active at a moderate intensity for at least 30 minutes a day for most days of the week. Moderate exercise is defined as exercise that makes your breath quicken, but you’re not out of breath. Also, moderate exercise may make you break out into a light sweat after about 10 minutes. Finally, this type of exercise may be done while you talk, but not while you sing. Examples of moderate exercises include brisk walking, swimming, or mowing the lawn.

    Other ways to reduce depression

    Besides exercise, other ways to reduce depression symptoms include:

    • Meeting with a qualified therapist or psychologist to talk on a regular basis. Health professionals in this field can help you to manage depressive symptoms. Also, they can recommend you to a psychiatrist that can assist with any medicines that may be helpful to you in treating symptoms.
    • Performing daily relaxation exercises like yoga, meditation, or relaxation breathing. Research shows that such exercises can help reduce depressive symptoms. Therefore, in addition to cardio exercise, be sure to practice such relaxing workouts at least once a week or more.
    • Eating a balanced diet with plenty of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables. Such foods can help reduce inflammation in the body and in turn may help reduce depressive symptoms. Therefore, be sure to add a variety of brightly-colored produce to your meals and snacks to improve the health of your body and mind.
    • Taking a daily supplement. A supplement like Elevia by Vita Sciences may help improve mood in those with depression. Elevia contains compounds like GABA and 5-HTP which can calm the mind and boost the “feel-good” hormone serotonin. Also, if you are low in certain vitamins like B-12, B-6, or folate then you may experience symptoms of depression. Therefore, a supplement to replenish such vitamins may help improve your quality of life. So, be sure to have your labs tested for such vitamins to see if you are deficient.

    References:

    American Psychiatric Association (accessed May 29, 2019) “What is Depression?”

    de Groot, M., et al. (2019) “Program ACTIVE II: Outcomes From a Randomized, Multi-State Community-Based Depression Treatment for Rural and Urban Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.” Diabetes Care, https://doi.org/10.2337/dc18-2400

    LaChance LR, Ramsey D. (September 2018) “Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression.” World J Psychiatry, 8(3):97-104.

    Mayo Clinic (May 15, 2019) “Exercise intensity: How to measure it.”

    Mayo Clinic (June 1, 2018) “Vitamin B-12 and depression: Are they related?”

    Streeter CC, et al. (March 2017) “Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder with Iyengar Yoga and Coherent Breathing: A Randomized Controlled Dosing Study.” J Altern Complement Med., 23(3):201-207.


  • Eat a plant-based diet for kidney health

    fruit, vegetable, plant, plant-based, diet, healthUnless you have kidney disease, you may not realize how important these small organs are to overall health. Although they are only about the size of a fist each, these bean-shaped organs do a lot for your body. Their main function is to filter the blood. However, they also work to remove wastes from the body as well as remove extra water to produce urine. The kidneys also make hormones to help with bone health and blood pressure health.

    Because of these important functions, it’s important to eat healthy to take care of your kidneys. The Kidney Foundation endorses a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet for kidney disease. This diet is rich in fruits and vegetables and lean proteins and is low in sodium and added sugar. A recent study confirms such recommendations by saying that a plant-based diet is key to kidney health. Let’s learn more about the plant-based diet and how it can help kidney health.

    About the plant-based diet

    A plant-based diet is well-known for its benefits to heart health and lowering risk of diabetes. If yo want to follow such a diet, you don’t need to eat just plants to reap the health benefits. However, just adding plant-based foods to meals and snacks each day can help you gain fiber and a variety of nutrients. Such nutrients include antioxidants that can reduce oxidative stress and lower risk of chronic diseases like heart disease and diabetes.

    Experts suggest that there are three types of plant-based diets that include:

    • An overall plant-based diet: This diet focuses mainly on plant-based fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds, while limiting all types of animal products. These animal products include meats, fish, poultry, dairy products, and eggs.
    • A healthful plant-based diet: This diet focuses on consuming mostly plant-based whole foods like fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and legumes. In addition, this diet limits less healthy plant-based foods like processed foods and also limits animal products.
    • An unhealthful plant-based diet: This type of diet consists mostly of unhealthy plant-based foods such as processed fruit juices, refined grains like pasta and white rice, as well as potatoes like french fries.

    It was found that those following the healthful plant-based diet had the lowest risk of heart disease. On the other hand, those who followed the unhealthful plant-based diet had the highest heart health risk.

    When it comes to kidney health, the plant-based diet can provide many health benefits.  One of the primary benefits is that it will hamper the development or progression of some complications of kidney disease like heart disease. Also, research shows that a plant-based diet can help improve blood pressure, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), of which the latter describes the flow rate of fluid through the kidney.

    Kidney health diet recommendations

    Vegetarianism, full or part-time, is recommended for those with kidney health issues. Therefore, a healthful plant-based diet, as mentioned before,  could be beneficial to kidney health. In fact, a recent report by the American College of Physicians states that a plant-based diet could slow the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and improve symptoms.

    The plant-based diet is recommended since diets rich in vegetable proteins, rather than animal proteins, can improve acidosis and slow nephropathy in patients with CKD and poor renal function.  Examples of plant-based diets, such as the Mediterranean and DASH diet, are recommended to improve kidney health.

    Take home message

    If you want to keep your kidneys healthy or improve the health of diseased kidneys, then the plant-based diet is the way to go. You can start slow by adding a serving of fruits or vegetables each day to meals and snacks. Then, slowly weed out most high sodium and high sugar foods from your diet. Before you know it, your body will feel better inside and out and your kidneys will be able to do their job the best it can.

    If you still feel you need extra help with kidney health, try a supplement like Urivo by Vita Sciences. Urivo contains cranberry and probiotics, or healthy bacteria, that support immune system, bladder, and kidney health.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    American College of Physicians Internal Medicine Meeting (April 17, 2019) “Best dietary practices for those with CKD.” Healio

    Gluba-Brzózka A, Franczyk B, Rysz J. (April 2017) “Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease-A Friend or Foe.” Nutrients. 9(4):374.

    Harvard Health Publishing Harvard Medical School (January 2018) “The right plant-based diet for you.”

    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (June 2018) “Your Kidneys & How They Work.”

    National Kidney Foundation (last reviewed February 2, 2017) “The DASH Diet.”

     

     

     

     


  • Reduce carbs at breakfast to lower blood sugar

    breakfast, carbohydrate, diabetes, health, dietWhen you first wake up in the money, it may be easy to grab something quick like a donut, pastry, or a quick bowl of cereal. However, what you choose to eat for breakfast could very well set the tone for what you eat the rest of the day. In fact, research shows that if you reduce carbohydrate intake at breakfast, then you could help control your blood glucose levels. Let’s learn a little more about this study, about blood glucose levels, as well as ways you can reduce carbs at your next morning meal.

    Reducing carbs at breakfast to lower blood glucose levels

    A recent study looked at the impact of a high-fat, low carbohydrate breakfast meal on blood glucose levels over 24 hours. Study results show that post-meal, or postprandial, hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) were reduced with this diet as compared to standard diet (55% calories from carbohydrate, 30% calories from fat, 15% calorie from protein). Also, this higher fat, lower carbohydrate breakfast helped keep blood glucose levels more stable throughout the day than the standard diet.

    How to eat a low-carb breakfast meal

    The following low to no-carb foods can be used to build a delicious low-carb breakfast meal.

    • Eggs
    • Bacon
    • Ham
    • Turkey
    • Chicken
    • Cottage cheese
    • Low carb vegetables like peppers, onions, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, zucchini, kale, mushrooms, and spinach
    • Cheese
    • Plain Greek yogurt
    • Low carb fruits like strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries

    Use this reference as a guide to other low-carb produce that can be added to your low carb meal.

    Other ways to lower blood glucose levels

    Besides making changes in your diet, read below for ways you can manage your blood glucose levels.

    • Stay active: Every step counts when it comes to your health. Therefore, be sure to stay active every day to help manage your blood glucose levels and keep your heart healthy. Staying active can help control blood glucose levels by making insulin more sensitive. Exercise will also help you to manage your weight and use the blood glucose you have for energy.
    • Manage stress: Stress can release hormones in the body that can raise blood glucose levels. Therefore, be sure to find ways to manage your stress levels. Walking, talking to a counselor, relaxation breathing, and yoga are some ways you can manage stress.
    • Drink plenty of water each day: The body is mostly made up of water, so its important for many processes in the body. When it comes to blood glucose, water can prevent dehydration and in turn help the body remove extra sugars from the body through your urine. Try to drink at least 8 cups of water or low to no calorie fluids per day. You may need more fluid each day depending on your height, weight, and activity level.
    • Check your blood glucose often:  If you have diabetes, then you should check your blood glucose levels often. This will help you track your progress and find areas of your diet or medication routine that may need to be tweaked. This will help you manage blood glucose levels better. Be sure to to visit your doctor at least once or twice a year to have labs checked and adjust your meds if needed.
    • Take a blood glucose control supplement: If you’re already eating a healthy diet and exercising, then the next step in lowering your blood glucose levels would be to add a blood glucose-lowering supplement if needed. Glucarex by Vita Sciences is an example of a blood glucose support supplement that could help you. Glucarex contains ingredients like chromium, alpha-lipoic acid, and cinnamon to naturally support healthy weight loss, metabolism, and blood glucose levels.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD of LighttrackNutrition.com

    References:

    Chang, C.R., Francois, M.E., and Little, J.P. (April 2019) “Restricting carbohydrates at breakfast is sufficient to reduce 24-hour exposure to postprandial hyperglycemia and improve glycemic variability.” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

    Fletcher, J. (last reviewed January 26, 2018 by Maria Prelipcean, M.D.) “How can you lower your blood sugar levels?” Medical News Today.

    University of California, San Francisco (accessed April 17, 2019) “Diabetes Education Online: Controlling Blood Sugar.”