Monthly Archives: May 2019

Exercise more to decrease risk of diabetes-related depression

yoga, exercise, health, mental health, depressionWhen you receive a diabetes diagnosis, it can be a life-changing time. This is because diabetes treatment can involve a change in diet, new medications, and checking blood glucose levels at home. Not to mention, that is can be scary to know that you have a condition that will be with you for life. It can be overwhelming and for some can cause depression. Fortunately, a recent study shows that adding exercise to your daily routine may help those with diabetes-related depression improve quality of life in body and mind.

What is depression?

Depression is a condition in which a person feels some of the symptoms listed below for a period of two weeks or more. These symptoms negatively impact quality of life at work, home, and in relationships. Such symptoms include:

  • Feeling sad
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed
  • Changes in appetite with weight loss or gain unrelated to dieting
  • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
  • Loss of energy or increased fatigue
  • Slowed movements and speech (actions observable by others)
  • Feeling worthless or guilty
  • Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

Depression is typically treated with medications and psychotherapy. Also, in severe cases, electroconvulsive therapy may be used. However, recent studies show that exercise may be helpful in decreasing symptoms of depression, especially in cases of diabetes-related depression.

Exercise and diabetes-related depression

Experts report that those people with diabetes are twice as likely to develop depression as those without the condition. Therefore, this group of people is of major interest to researchers. In fact, a recent study looked at the impact of various treatments on those with diabetes and depression. Over 12 weeks, 140 people received either cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), exercise, or a combo of both treatments. Those receiving exercise treatment were encouraged to stay active with moderate exercise for 150 minutes a week.

Study results show that those in the exercise group had the highest odds of major depressive disorder depression than those not receiving this treatment. Also, those who received the combo treatment of exercise and CBT had a twice as likely chance to go into remission from their depression. Although this study shows promise that exercise is helpful for depressive symptoms, you should not stop your usual care plan. Use exercise only as a part of your treatment plan and not the entire treatment plan.

About moderate exercise

In order to reap the benefits of exercise, it’s important to stay active at a moderate intensity for at least 30 minutes a day for most days of the week. Moderate exercise is defined as exercise that makes your breath quicken, but you’re not out of breath. Also, moderate exercise may make you break out into a light sweat after about 10 minutes. Finally, this type of exercise may be done while you talk, but not while you sing. Examples of moderate exercises include brisk walking, swimming, or mowing the lawn.

Other ways to reduce depression

Besides exercise, other ways to reduce depression symptoms include:

  • Meeting with a qualified therapist or psychologist to talk on a regular basis. Health professionals in this field can help you to manage depressive symptoms. Also, they can recommend you to a psychiatrist that can assist with any medicines that may be helpful to you in treating symptoms.
  • Performing daily relaxation exercises like yoga, meditation, or relaxation breathing. Research shows that such exercises can help reduce depressive symptoms. Therefore, in addition to cardio exercise, be sure to practice such relaxing workouts at least once a week or more.
  • Eating a balanced diet with plenty of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables. Such foods can help reduce inflammation in the body and in turn may help reduce depressive symptoms. Therefore, be sure to add a variety of brightly-colored produce to your meals and snacks to improve the health of your body and mind.
  • Taking a daily supplement. A supplement like Elevia by Vita Sciences may help improve mood in those with depression. Elevia contains compounds like GABA and 5-HTP which can calm the mind and boost the “feel-good” hormone serotonin. Also, if you are low in certain vitamins like B-12, B-6, or folate then you may experience symptoms of depression. Therefore, a supplement to replenish such vitamins may help improve your quality of life. So, be sure to have your labs tested for such vitamins to see if you are deficient.

References:

American Psychiatric Association (accessed May 29, 2019) “What is Depression?”

de Groot, M., et al. (2019) “Program ACTIVE II: Outcomes From a Randomized, Multi-State Community-Based Depression Treatment for Rural and Urban Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.” Diabetes Care, https://doi.org/10.2337/dc18-2400

LaChance LR, Ramsey D. (September 2018) “Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression.” World J Psychiatry, 8(3):97-104.

Mayo Clinic (May 15, 2019) “Exercise intensity: How to measure it.”

Mayo Clinic (June 1, 2018) “Vitamin B-12 and depression: Are they related?”

Streeter CC, et al. (March 2017) “Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder with Iyengar Yoga and Coherent Breathing: A Randomized Controlled Dosing Study.” J Altern Complement Med., 23(3):201-207.


  • Learn about your heart during High Blood Pressure Education Month

    heart, health, heart health, blood pressure, hypertensionThe National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has named May High Blood Pressure Education Month. And since heart disease is one of the leading killers of adults in the United States, it’s important that everyone learn how to care for their heart. Read below for information on blood pressure, how to reduce your risk for hypertension and heart disease, and how some supplements may help your heart.

    All about blood pressure

    Blood pressure is the measure of blood flow through your vessels. When you visit the doctor, your blood pressure reading may involve two numbers. The top number is called the systolic pressure. This number measures the pressure of blood against the artery walls in the body when the heart beats. Meanwhile, the bottom number is the diastolic pressure. This number measures the pressure of blood in the body between heart beats.

    According to the American Heart Association, a normal blood pressure reading is less than 120 mmHg over 80 mmHg. Blood pressure is considered elevated if it is higher than 120 mmHg over 80 mmHg.  If you have a consistent blood pressure of 140 mmHg over 90 mmHg, then your doctor may diagnose you with high blood pressure, or hypertension.

    Lower your heart health risk

    It’s important to lower your blood pressure to lower your heart health risk. This is because having hypertension can increase your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. If you have hypertension, your doctor will likely give you medicine(s) to help lower it. However, it’s also important to make the following lifestyle changes to help lower your blood pressure and improve your heart health.

    • Eating a heart healthy diet: Consuming plenty of fiber and antioxidant rich fruits and vegetables in your diet can help your heart. This is because antioxidants can help reduce inflammation in the body. And since heart disease is an inflammatory disease, you can lower heart disease risk by eating such anti-inflammatory foods. Be sure to balance your plate with some lean protein from chicken, fish, legumes, or low-fat dairy products as well.
    • Exercise: Moving more can not only help to manage your weight, but can lower and control your blood pressure.  You don’t need a boot camp workout each day to stay healthy. Just move as much as possible for a total of at least 30 minutes a day to help manage weight and keep your heart strong.
    • Manage your weight: Experts suggest that losing just 3 to 5-percent of your body weight can help lower your blood pressure readings.
    • Lower stress:  Learn to manage stress better to help control your blood pressure and improve overall quality of life. You can do this by talking to a trusted counselor or loved one, doing yoga or meditation, exercising, or by relaxation breathing, to name a few ways.
    • Quit smoking: Smoking can constrict your blood vessels and in turn increase blood pressure. Therefore, if you don’t smoke, then don’t start. If you do smoke, try to quit by contacting your healthcare provider for help or using resources from Smokefree.gov.
    • Take care of your teeth: You may wonder what brushing your teeth has to do with heart health. However, experts say that those who have gum disease often have the same risk factors for heart disease. This is because bacteria from the gums in those with gum disease can seep into the blood stream and cause inflammation of the body. This can lead to inflammation in the blood vessels and increase risk of heart disease. Therefore, be sure to visit your dental care provider every six months and be sure to brush and floss daily.
    • Sleep enough: Research shows that those who sleep less than six hours a night are more likely to have a heart attack and stroke than those who slept more. Therefore, try to set a bedtime schedule, avoid screen time about an hour before bedtime, and avoid eating an hour or two before bed. If you still have trouble sleeping, visit your healthcare provider for tips or sleep treatments that may help.

    Heart healthy supplements

    Besides these heart health tips, it may be helpful to add a supplement to your routine to help your heart. Vita Sciences carries a wide array of heart health supplements that could help. Alestra is one supplement by Vita Sciences that contains niacin, plant sterols, and garlic to help support healthy cholesterol levels. Another supplement by Vita Sciences for heart health is Circova. Circova contains L-arginine, niacin, and hawthorne to help improve blood flow and blood pressure. Finally, Presura by Vita Sciences contains hawthorn berry, niacin, and garlic extract to help support a healthier heart and blood pressure.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    American Heart Association (last reviewed November 30, 2017) “Understanding Blood Pressure Readings.”

    Cleveland Clinic (February 5, 2019) “5 Things to Do Every Day to Keep Your Heart Healthy.” health essentials

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (accessed May 18, 2019) “High Blood Pressure.”

    Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (last updated November 30, 2018) “Keep Your Heart Healthy.” healthfinder.gov


  • Lower your stress to lower diabetes risk

    Stress is an inevitable part of life. Whether you’re stuck in traffic, running late for work, juggling a heavy workload, or dealing with family issues, everyone deals with stress in some way on a daily basis. However, since it can be hard to avoid stress, how you deal with it can impact the way it affects your health. A recent study has found that those with more reported stress had a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who had less reported stress.

    What is stress? 

    You may know what stress feels like, but do you actually know what it is? By definition, stress is the body’s natural defense against danger. Stress often occurs when a person is overwhelmed by the demands they face at any given time. In times of stress, the body releases certain hormones that prepare the body to deal with stress. Also, in times of stress, digestion slows, breathing quickens, and heart rate increases. This fight or flight response provides the body with the resources it needs to face any dangers.

    Stress and diabetes

    During the fight or flight response, the hormones released create a lot of energy that the cells can use. This energy comes in the form of glucose and fat. In those with diabetes, this fight or flight response may not always work so well.  This is because insulin may not always be working well or be present at all to help the cells use energy. In turn, the glucose can build up in the blood.

    Not to mention that stress can also increase blood glucose levels directly. Research shows that those with type 2 diabetes often have higher blood glucose levels when they experience stress. Also, those who experience stress may not deal with it in a healthy way. For example, some people may drink alcohol, smoke, or eat unhealthy foods when they feel stress. This in turn can increase blood glucose levels and negatively impact health.

    Stress and diabetes research

    A recent study by Chinese researchers looked at data from around 500,000 adults. This data included blood glucose levels, reported stress, and other related health data. Study results show that those who reported one stressful event had a 10-percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those who reported none.

    This risk went up to 33-percent when a person reported two or more stressful events. Personal stress seemed to produce the highest levels of diabetes risk. This type of stress especially affected diabetes risk when it involved losing a job, retiring, or death of a loved one.

    How to manage stress and diabetes

    From these study results, it’s clear to see that stress has a direct link with diabetes risk. Now since you can’t control the stress that enters your life, but you control how you deal with it. Experts suggest that by better managing stress, you can lessen the impact it has on your health. Some examples of ways to cope with stress include:

    • deep breathing
    • gardening
    • walking
    • yoga
    • meditating
    • listening to your favorite music
    • talking with a counselor or trusted friend or loved one

    When you are better able to handle stress, you will be better able to handle your health. In other words, when you can manage stress better, you will likely be better able to take care of your health in other ways. You will likely move more, make healthier food choices, sleep better, and keep better track of your blood glucose levels.  In turn, these healthy habits will help you better deal with your diabetes.

    If you still feel like stress is keeping you up at night though, then try Somnova by Vita Sciences. Using natural ingredients like L-theanine and melatonin, Somnova works to relax your mind, produce peaceful sleep, and in turn help you feel refreshed. This improved sleep can help you to better manage stress in your life, and in turn lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD of LighttrackNutrition.com

    References:

    American Diabetes Association (last reviewed June 7, 2013) “Stress.” http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/mental-health/stress.html

    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (November 2016) “Managing Diabetes.”

    Nordqvist, C. (last updated November 28, 2017 by Timothy J. Legg, Ph.D., CRNP) “Why stress happens and how to manage it.” Medical News Today

    Wang, M., et al. (February 2019) “Associations between stressful life events and diabetes: Findings from the China Kadoorie Biobank study of 500,000 adults.” Journal of Diabetes Investigation, https://doi.org/10.1111/jdi.13028

     


  • Could intermittent fasting help your diabetes control?

    intermittent fasting, fasting, health, weight loss, dietWhen it comes to diabetes control, you may know that carbohydrate intake must be controlled. Along with this, intake of certain concentrated sweets and sugary drinks should be limited. Also, a plant-based diet has been shown to help diabetes. Besides these traditional methods of controlling blood glucose through diet, meal timing, like intermittent fasting, may also help. Recent studies show that limiting meal times to a certain portion of the day may help improve weight and metabolic health.

    What is meal timing?

    Meal timing can describe a number of different ways of eating. For athletes it may mean timing meals before and after workout to ensure sufficient energy. However, for those with diabetes, it may mean planning out carbohydrate intake to control blood glucose levels. Also, meal timing could mean intermittent fasting, which limits the amount of time a person eats during each day.  Research over the past few years shows that intermittent fasting may help improve metabolic health parameters. This in turn could help improve blood glucose control in those with diabetes.

    What is intermittent fasting?

    There are several forms of intermittent fasting (IF), but the premise for all forms is similar. Basically, IF limits the amount of time each day that a person eats so that the body can heal during hours of fasting. The most common forms of IF include:

    • Fasting for 12 hours a day: Those starting out on IF can use this method to help your body adapt to fasting gradually.
    • The 16:8 method:  This method of IF involves fasting for 16 hours a day, and limiting eating to 8 hours daily.
    • The 5:2 method: This method of IF involves eating a healthy, balanced diet for 5 days. Then on the other two days, you consume only 500 to 600 calories on two, non-consecutive days of the week
    • Alternate day fasting: This method of IF involves fasting every other day. On fasting days, you can consume either no food or only about 500 calories. Although, you should consume plenty of low to no calorie fluids for hydration. This is an extreme form of IF, so be sure to ask your doctor before starting to make sure its safe for you.

    IF and blood glucose control

    Recent research shows that IF may help those with diabetes control their blood glucose. One study involved three case studies of patients with diabetes that followed IF.  Each patient fasted for 3 to 4 days a week for 7 to 11 months. Study results show that patients were able to lose significant amounts of weight and reduce their HgA1C levels. An HgA1C level is the average blood glucose level of a person over three months.

    Another study looked at the effect of a 1-week trial of IF on 15 men at risk of diabetes. These men only consumed food for nine hours during the day, and then fasted for 15 hours.  During their feeding times, they consumed their regular diets. Study results show that restricting eating time during the day can help improve blood glucose levels. In turn, this could help those at risk for type 2 diabetes to lower their risk of this chronic disease.

    Other ways to control blood glucose levels

    Besides changes in diet, there are other ways a person can control their blood glucose levels such as the following:

    • Exercise: Staying active most days of the week for at least 30 minutes can help you improve insulin sensitivity and control blood glucose. You don’t have to exercise all 30 minutes at once. Just a few minutes of exercise throughout the day adds up to better blood glucose and overall health.
    • Medication: Be sure to follow the medication regimen recommended by your doctor to help control your blood glucose levels. Also, visit your doctor often to keep track of your blood glucose levels and tweak your dosage if needed.
    • Manage stress: Since stress can increase your blood glucose level, it’s important to manage stress to control blood glucose levels. Working with a psychologist, learning to relaxation breathe, or taking yoga classes can help you manage stress.
    • Take a daily supplement: If your doctor is ok with it, then a daily supplement might help blood glucose control. A supplement such as Glucarex by VitaSciences contains ingredients like cinnamon and alpha lipoic acid can support weight loss as well as healthy metabolism and blood glucose levels.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD of LighttrackNutrition.com

    References:

    Cohut, M. (May 2, 2019) “To control blood sugar, set strict meal times.” Medical News Today.

    Furmli, S., Elmasry, R., Ramos, M. and Fung, J. (October 2018) “Therapeutic use of intermittent fasting for people with type 2 diabetes as an alternative to insulin.” BMJ Case Rep., 2018: bcr2017221854.

    Leonard, J. (last reviewed June 28, 2018 by Butler, RD, LD, N.) “Seven ways to do intermittent fasting.” Medical News Today.

    Mayo Clinic (May 6, 2017) “Diabetes management: How lifestyle, daily routine affect blood sugar.”


  • Eat a plant-based diet for kidney health

    fruit, vegetable, plant, plant-based, diet, healthUnless you have kidney disease, you may not realize how important these small organs are to overall health. Although they are only about the size of a fist each, these bean-shaped organs do a lot for your body. Their main function is to filter the blood. However, they also work to remove wastes from the body as well as remove extra water to produce urine. The kidneys also make hormones to help with bone health and blood pressure health.

    Because of these important functions, it’s important to eat healthy to take care of your kidneys. The Kidney Foundation endorses a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet for kidney disease. This diet is rich in fruits and vegetables and lean proteins and is low in sodium and added sugar. A recent study confirms such recommendations by saying that a plant-based diet is key to kidney health. Let’s learn more about the plant-based diet and how it can help kidney health.

    About the plant-based diet

    A plant-based diet is well-known for its benefits to heart health and lowering risk of diabetes. If yo want to follow such a diet, you don’t need to eat just plants to reap the health benefits. However, just adding plant-based foods to meals and snacks each day can help you gain fiber and a variety of nutrients. Such nutrients include antioxidants that can reduce oxidative stress and lower risk of chronic diseases like heart disease and diabetes.

    Experts suggest that there are three types of plant-based diets that include:

    • An overall plant-based diet: This diet focuses mainly on plant-based fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds, while limiting all types of animal products. These animal products include meats, fish, poultry, dairy products, and eggs.
    • A healthful plant-based diet: This diet focuses on consuming mostly plant-based whole foods like fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and legumes. In addition, this diet limits less healthy plant-based foods like processed foods and also limits animal products.
    • An unhealthful plant-based diet: This type of diet consists mostly of unhealthy plant-based foods such as processed fruit juices, refined grains like pasta and white rice, as well as potatoes like french fries.

    It was found that those following the healthful plant-based diet had the lowest risk of heart disease. On the other hand, those who followed the unhealthful plant-based diet had the highest heart health risk.

    When it comes to kidney health, the plant-based diet can provide many health benefits.  One of the primary benefits is that it will hamper the development or progression of some complications of kidney disease like heart disease. Also, research shows that a plant-based diet can help improve blood pressure, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), of which the latter describes the flow rate of fluid through the kidney.

    Kidney health diet recommendations

    Vegetarianism, full or part-time, is recommended for those with kidney health issues. Therefore, a healthful plant-based diet, as mentioned before,  could be beneficial to kidney health. In fact, a recent report by the American College of Physicians states that a plant-based diet could slow the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and improve symptoms.

    The plant-based diet is recommended since diets rich in vegetable proteins, rather than animal proteins, can improve acidosis and slow nephropathy in patients with CKD and poor renal function.  Examples of plant-based diets, such as the Mediterranean and DASH diet, are recommended to improve kidney health.

    Take home message

    If you want to keep your kidneys healthy or improve the health of diseased kidneys, then the plant-based diet is the way to go. You can start slow by adding a serving of fruits or vegetables each day to meals and snacks. Then, slowly weed out most high sodium and high sugar foods from your diet. Before you know it, your body will feel better inside and out and your kidneys will be able to do their job the best it can.

    If you still feel you need extra help with kidney health, try a supplement like Urivo by Vita Sciences. Urivo contains cranberry and probiotics, or healthy bacteria, that support immune system, bladder, and kidney health.

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    American College of Physicians Internal Medicine Meeting (April 17, 2019) “Best dietary practices for those with CKD.” Healio

    Gluba-Brzózka A, Franczyk B, Rysz J. (April 2017) “Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease-A Friend or Foe.” Nutrients. 9(4):374.

    Harvard Health Publishing Harvard Medical School (January 2018) “The right plant-based diet for you.”

    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (June 2018) “Your Kidneys & How They Work.”

    National Kidney Foundation (last reviewed February 2, 2017) “The DASH Diet.”