Monthly Archives: November 2018

Every step of exercise counts towards brain and heart health

exercise, health, heart, step, pedometerExercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. Along with healthy eating, managing stress, and sleeping enough, exercise is vital for heart health. However, starting an exercise program can be hard.

You may think you have to start going to the gym every day and take intense classes each week to see results. The truth is though that you can reap the benefits of exercise with every step. Switch your focus from trying to fit in long bouts of activity each day. Instead, just try to focus on moving more through the day. This is because research shows that even just two minutes of activity at a time can help heart and brain health.

How much exercise do I need?

For most adults, 30 minutes of moderate exercise is recommended each day for most days  of the week. This moderate exercise can include brisk walking, water aerobics, or dancing, to name a few. During moderate exercise, your heart will beat faster and it will be harder to breathe. However, with moderate intensity you should still be able to talk.

A recent report released by the U.S. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans showed that any amount of activity can improve health.  Older guidelines stated that a person had to exercise for at least ten minutes or longer for it to count towards daily exercise. However, research now shows that any decrease in sedentary behavior can help.

This is because being inactive causes about 10-percent of premature death in the United States. Therefore, any single bout of exercise, even just a few minutes, can improve sleep, blood pressure, and sharpen the mind. The weekly recommended amount of exercise of 150 minutes remains the same. However, this total can come from any small bout of activity during your day.

How can exercise help brain health?

The heart health benefits of exercise are widely known. First of all, it helps lower risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Secondly, it has shown to improve sleep, lower risk of obesity, and improve mental health. However, what may be lesser known is the impact of exercise on brain health.

When it comes to brain health, exercise has found to have several benefits. First of all, being active can help improve mental health factors like anxiety and depression. Also, being active can improve brain function in those with dementia or multiple sclerosis. Finally, keeping your body active can help just about anyone improve memory, attention, and processing speed.

How can I add exercise in my day?

You don’t have to have a membership to a gym to stay active. In fact, just a comfortable pair of walking shoes and a little motivation can help you meet your exercise goals. Here are some tips you can use to add more activity in your day.

  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Although this may not be ideal for those with joint issues, some may benefit from taking the stairs to grab a few more steps in during the day.
  • Park a bit further out from your destination. When you are going to the store or market, park a little but further out so you can have a few extra exercise minutes during your daily routine. During this same trip, you could also walk a few extra laps of the store or market to collect even more exercise minutes.
  • Take a walk after dinner with your family, dog, or friends. Not only will this help your food digest a little better, but you can collect some exercise minutes at the end of your day.
  • Walk during commercials. If the only down time you find during your day is at night, then use your TV time to stay active. During commercial breaks, no matter how short, use this time to walk around the house or walk in place. This will help you collect your exercise minutes before you go to bed.

If you find that joint pain is getting in the way of your exercise goals, try a supplement like turmeric. Turmeric, like that from Vita Sciences, helps to reduce inflammation in the body which can help support a healthy heart and joints. This formula contains 95% curcuminoids as well as bioperine black pepper extract to help improve the bioavailability of curcumin.

References:

 American Heart Association (April 18, 2018) “American Heart Association Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adults and Kids.” https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/fitness/fitness-basics/aha-recs-for-physical-activity-in-adults

Thompson, D. (November 12, 2018) “Even a 2-Minute Walk Counts in New Physical Activity Guidelines.” https://consumer.healthday.com/fitness-information-14/misc-health-news-265/even-a-2-minute-walk-counts-in-new-physical-activity-guidelines-739584.html

 

 

 


  • Nuts can be your heart’s best friend

     

    From peanuts to pistachios, or almonds to macadamias, nuts can be a delicious, healthy snack any time of day. Nuts provide a plant-based food full of fiber, protein, and antioxidants that can add flavor and health to any dish. Not only that, but research shows that adding nuts to your daily routine can improve heart health and weight management, to name a few health benefits. Let’s learn a little more about nuts and how you can make them a staple in your healthy lifestyle routine.

    About nuts and heart health

    Nuts are a plant-based food that for many years was avoided by many due to its high calorie content. However, research now shows that this calorie dense food is also nutrient dense and could benefit heart health. This is due to the healthy mixture of unsaturated and omega-3 fats as well as protein and fiber.

    The highest protein nuts are almonds, and pistachios at about 6 grams per ounce. Cashews are not far behind at five grams of protein per ounce. When it comes to fiber, almonds, pistachios, pecans, and hazelnuts top the list of tree nuts at 3 grams of fiber per ounce. Furthermore, pecans and walnuts provide the most omega-3 fatty acids of the tree nuts at 278 and 2565 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids, respectively.

    Nuts and metabolic health

    Two recent studies looked at the health benefits of adding nuts to your daily routine. The first study looked at the impact of nut intake on weight gain. Study results show that by replacing a serving of unhealthy food with an ounce of nuts, a person could lower risk of weight gain and obesity. Such unhealthy foods that could be replaced include red meat, processed meat, French fries, desserts, or potato chips. Research suggests that by doing this you could help counteract the gradual weight gain many adults have with aging. This in turn could help reduce risk of obesity-related conditions like heart disease and diabetes.

    A second study looked at the impact of Brazil nut intake on overall health in healthy people. People in the study groups were given either a serving of Brazil nuts or pretzels with similar calorie and sodium content. Study results show that those given the Brazil nuts had an increased feeling of fullness. Also, nut intake prevented an increase in blood glucose and insulin levels after eating. These increases occurred with those eating pretzels about forty minutes after eating. Researchers suggest that this positive metabolic impact of Brazil nuts is likely due to its rich selenium content.

    Other ways to improve metabolic health

    Besides eating nuts, there are other ways you can help improve your health that include:

    • Sleeping enough at night. Most adults require at least seven to nine hours of sleep each night for your best health. Experts suggest that if you don’t receive enough sleep, your risk for type 2 diabetes can increase. Therefore, if you have trouble sleeping, be sure to visit your healthcare provider for tips. They can also see if you may have pain or sleep apnea that is preventing you from sleeping well.
    • Moving more. Staying active can help you reduce your risk of heart disease or diabetes. It does this by helping you to manage weight and improve insulin resistance. Therefore, try to engage in moderate activity for a total of 30 minutes a day most days. Such activities inlcude walking, biking, swimming, gardening, or other aerobic activity.
    • Managing stress. Stress can sap your energy levels and can also increase blood glucose levels and blood pressure. Therefore, find ways to manage your stress like relaxation breathing, yoga, or talking to a counselor. Also, taking a walk outside can  help refresh your mind so you manage stress better. Make time in your schedule for “me-time” that can help you improve your health.
    • Taking supplements when needed.  If you are B12-, iron-, or vitamin D-deficient, you can feel fatigued. This can make you not feel like being active and healthy. Therefore, be sure to have your nutrient levels checked each year. If you are low, you can take a supplement if needed to put your health on track. An example of such a supplement is Glucarex by Vita Sciences. Glucarex contains compounds like alpha-lipoic acid, cinnamon, and chromium. Along with antioxidant vitamins C and E, this supplement can help support healthy weight loss, metabolism, and blood glucose levels.

     References:

    Harvard Health Publishing: Harvard Medical School (June 2017) “Why nutritionists are crazy about nuts.” https://www.health.harvard.edu/nutrition/why-nutritionists-are-crazy-about-nuts

    Mayo Clinic (September 9, 2016) “Diabetes prevention: 5 tips for taking control.” https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-prevention/art-20047639

    National Sleep Foundation (accessed November 13, 2018) “The link between a lack of sleep and type 2 diabetes.” https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems-list/the-link-between-lack-sleep-and-type-2-diabetes

    Sandoiu, A. (November 5, 2018) “Daily serving of nuts may stave off weight gain.” Medical News Today, https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323577.php

    Today’s Dietitian (accessed November 13, 2018) “Nutritional Profiles of Tree Nuts.” https://www.todaysdietitian.com/pdf/webinars/treenuts/NutritionalProfilesofTreeNuts.pdf

     

     


  • Could a vegan diet improve your mood and your diabetes?

    vegan, vegetarian, health, dietVegan diets have seemed to gain popularity over the years for several reasons. First of all, a plant-based diet full of fiber and antioxidants seems to improve heart health risk factors. Secondly, it’s a way for people to show they support animal rights. Also, it’s an eating regimen that can be fitting for those who may have dairy and or egg allergies. However, recent research shows that a vegan diet could also help improve the health of body and mind of those with type 2 diabetes. 

    What is a vegan diet?

    A vegan diet is one that avoids any animal products. This includes meat, poultry, fish, seafood, eggs, as well as dairy products. No to mention, that this type of diet avoids ingredients like gelatin, honey, beeswax, casein, and whey that come from animals or insects.

    Many vegan-certified products sit on store shelves. From meatless burgers, cookies, and dairy-free cheese, these products make this diet regimen easier to follow long-term. However, it’s important to remember that these foods are still processed. Since this diet’s health benefits stem from its plant-based nature, you should consume mostly whole foods for optimal health.

    Vegan diet and diabetes

    A recent study shows that eating a meat-free, dairy free diet full of plant-based foods can improve mood and overall health. This evidence review looked at studies of those with type 2 diabetes following a vegan diet.  Study results show that those with diabetes on such plant-based diets had better control of their diabetes and overall health.  These individuals had better control of their blood glucose levels, lipid levels, and cholesterol levels.

    And if that wasn’t enough to convince you to eat plant-based, these individuals saw several other benefits too. In over half of the studies reviewed, those with diabetes were able to cut down or discontinue their diabetes medicines. Also, some individuals reported reduced diabetic nerve pain as well as improved mental health factors and quality of life.

    Other ways to improve your diabetes

    A plant-based diet is not the only way to help improve your diabetes. Read below for more tips on how to feel better in body and mind whether you have diabetes or not.

    • Stay active: It’s important for just about everyone to stay active for overall health. Exercise can help you manage stress, keep your heart string, help you to manage weight, and can also improve diabetes risk factors. When it comes to diabetes, staying active can help improve insulin resistance in the body. Therefore, try to exercise for at least 30 minutes a day most days. It doesn’t have to be anything strenuous. Just walking, gardening, or cleaning house can count towards your exercise. And you can split it up into smaller fragments of exercise like 5 or 10 minutes of exercise several times a day to make it more practical.
    • Sleep enough each night: It’s important for most adults to sleep at least seven and nine hours a night for your best health. This is especially true for those with diabetes. This is because a lack of sleep, which throws off hormone levels in the body, can  increase risk of type 2 diabetes.
    • Manage stress: When you are stressed, your blood pressure can rise. Not only that, but stress can also increase blood glucose levels. Therefore, it’s important to find ways to manage your stress to help improve your diabetes or lower risk for diabetes. Some ways you can try to manage stress include relaxation breathing, yoga, talking to a counselor, or taking a walk when you feel stressed.
    • Add a supplement to your daily regimen: If you are deficient in any nutrients like iron or vitamin B12, you may feel fatigue which can make it hard to stay active an healthy. Therefore, be sure to have your nutrient levels checked each year and supplement if needed. You can also try a supplement made just for those trying to control diabetes like Glucarex by Vita Sciences. Glucarex contains compounds like chromium, alpha lipoic acid, and cinnamon to help support weight loss, healthy metabolism, and healthy blood glucose levels.

    References:

    Kahleova, H., Levin, S., and Barnard, N.D. (May-June 2018) “Vegetarian Dietary Patterns and Cardiovascular Disease.” Progress in cardiovascular diseases, 61(1): 54-61.

    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (January 2016) “4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life.”

    National Sleep Foundation (accessed November 12, 2018) “The link between a lack of sleep and type 2 diabetes.”

    Thompson, D. (October 30, 2018) “For Diabetics, Going Vegan May Boost Mood Along With Health.” HealthDay online

     

     


  • Is there a link between diabetes and depression?

    depression, mental health, anxiety, healthDepression on its own can be a very challenging condition to deal with. This diagnosis not only affects the mind, but can affect the body as well. It can make everyday tasks difficult to deal with such as sleeping, working, and even eating. Because of the effect of depression on eating behaviors, weight gain or loss can occur through appetite changes unrelated to diet.  Not only that, but because of the many lifestyle changes that come with a diabetes diagnosis, depression is seen two to three times more often in such patients than those without diabetes. A recent study looked at how diet and exercise factors can affect the relationship between depression and metabolic syndrome.

    What is depression?

    We all may feel depressed from time to time. However, a diagnosis of depression is a chronic display of such feelings that can affect daily life, relationships, and can cause both psychological and physical symptoms. If the following symptoms occur for two weeks or more, then you should see a doctor for possible diagnosis and treatment of depression.

    • Feeling sad or having a depressed mood
    • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
    • Changes in appetite
    • Weight loss or gain unrelated to dieting
    • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
    • Loss of energy or increased fatigue
    • Slowed movements and speech
    • Feeling worthless or guilty
    • Difficulty concentrating or making decisions
    • Thoughts of death or suicide

    Conditions related to the thyroid, nutrient deficiencies, or tumors of the brain can mimic symptoms of depression. Therefore, such underlying causes should be ruled out by a qualified healthcare provider.

    Metabolic syndrome and depression

    Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk factors that can increase a person’s risk of chronic diseases like diabetes and stroke.

    • A waist circumference of more than 35 inches for women and 40 inches for men
    • A triglyceride level of 150 mg/dL or higher
    • An HDL cholesterol level of less than 50 mg/dL for women and less than 40 mg/dL for men
    • A blood pressure of 130/85 mmHg or higher
    • A fasting blood sugar level of 100 mg/dL or higher

    Research shows that there is a relationship between those with depression and metabolic syndrome.  A recent study looked at this relationship to see what exactly is causing it. Researchers looked at data from over 64,000 adults. Study results show that those with depression are highly linked to a high fat, high sugar diet regimen and low levels of physical activity.

    Researchers suggest that diet and exercise may link depression and metabolic syndrome. However, they also state that inflammation and genetic factors have a greater causal link between the two conditions. Inflammation can develop as a result of the stress on the brain due to depression that may cause an imbalance in gut microbiome. This link is a theory known as the gut-brain axis. This in turn, could cause inflammation in the body that could increase risk of chronic diseases like heat disease and diabetes.

    How to lower risk of metabolic syndrome

    Besides diet and exercise, you can use the tips below to help lower your risk of metabolic syndrome.

    • Add more fruit and vegetables to your diet: More fruits and vegetables means more antioxidants. And more antioxidants in your diet means more anti-inflammatory power. In turn, you can help reduce inflammation in your body by adding more colorful fiber sources to your plate at each meal.
    • Move more: Exercising at least 30 minutes a day for most days of the week can help you manage your weight. It can also help you manage stress and strengthen your heart. All of these factors can help reduce inflammation in your body and lower chronic disease risk.
    • Stop smoking or never start: Smoking can constrict blood vessels and in turn can increase heart disease risk. Therefore, if you already smoke, visit Smokefree.gov to quit. If you have never started smoking, then don’t. Your body will thank you.
    • Take a daily supplement: If you are deficient in nutrients, then this could put you at risk for conditions like depression that have an inflammatory link.  Certain supplements can also help you gain better control over your blood glucose levels too. Glucarex by Vita Sciences is one such supplement that uses chromium, alpha lipoic acid, and cinnamon to help support weight loss, metabolism, and blood glucose levels.

     

    -written by Staci Gulbin, MS, MEd, RD

    References:

    American Psychiatric Association (January 2017) “What is Depression?”  Physician Review By: Ranna Parekh, M.D., M.P.H.

    Matta J, Hoertel N, Kesse-Guyot E, et al. (2019) Diet and physical activity in the association between depression and metabolic syndrome: Constances studyJ Affect Disord., 244:25-32.

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (accessed November 6, 2018) “Metabolic Syndrome.”